3548 Eurybates

Last updated
3548 Eurybates
Eurybates-satellite.gif
Eurybates and its satellite Queta imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2019–2020
Discovery [1]
Discovered by C. J. van Houten
I. van Houten-G.
Tom Gehrels
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date19 September 1973
Designations
(3548) Eurybates
Pronunciation /jʊˈrɪbətz/ [2]
Named after
Eurybates [3]
(Greek mythology)
1973 SO ·1954 CB
1957 JX ·1978 EE5
1985 TZ
Jupiter trojan [1] [4] [5]
Greek [6] [7]
Eurybates [7] [8]

binary
Orbital characteristics [4]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 19.59 yr (7,154 d)
Aphelion 5.6525 AU
Perihelion 4.7317 AU
5.1921 AU
Eccentricity 0.0887
11.83 yr (4,321 d)
237.34°
0° 4m 59.88s / day
Inclination 8.0591°
43.538°
27.799°
Jupiter  MOID 0.0945 AU
TJupiter 2.9720
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
63.89±0.30 km [9] [10]
68.40±3.92 km [11]
72.08 km(derived) [5]
72.14±4.1 km [12]
8.711±0.009  h [13]
8.73±0.01 h [14]
0.0491(derived) [5]
0.052±0.007 [9] [10]
0.0538±0.007 [12]
0.060±0.007 [11]
C (assumed) [5] [10]
C P [15]
B–V = 0.677±0.052 [16]
V–R = 0.352±0.045 [16]
V–I = 0.691±0.050 [16]
9.50 [11] [12]
9.55±0.30 [17]
9.6 [1] [4] [5]
9.8 [9]

    3548 Eurybates ( /jʊˈrɪbətz/ yə-RIB-ə-teez) is a carbonaceous Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp and the parent body of the Eurybates family, approximately 68 kilometers (42 miles) in diameter. It is a target to be visited by the Lucy mission in August 2027. Discovered during the second Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1973, it was later named after Eurybates from Greek mythology. The C/P-type asteroid belongs to the 60 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 8.7 hours. Eurybates has one known satellite, named Queta, that was discovered in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in September 2018.

    Contents

    Discovery

    Eurybates was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States. In 1951, it was first observed as 1954 CB at the Goethe Link Observatory, extending the asteroid's observation arc by 22 years prior to its official discovery observation at Palomar. [1] Since the discovery of 588 Achilles by Max Wolf in 1906, more than 7000 Jupiter trojans, with nearly 4600 bodies in the Greek camp, have already been discovered. [6]

    Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey

    While the discovery date aligns with the second Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey, Eurybates has not received a "T-2" prefixed survey designation, which was assigned for the discoveries made by the fruitful collaboration between the Palomar and Leiden observatories in the 1960s and 1970s. Gehrels used Palomar's Samuel Oschin telescope (also known as the 48-inch Schmidt Telescope), and shipped the photographic plates to Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden Observatory where astrometry was carried out. The trio are credited with the discovery of several thousand asteroids. [18]

    Orbit and classification

    Eurybates is a dark Jovian asteroid orbiting in the leading Greek camp at Jupiter's L4 Lagrangian point, 60° ahead of Jupiter's orbit in a 1:1 resonance (see Trojans in astronomy). [6] [7] It orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.7–5.7  AU once every 11 years and 10 months (4,321 days; semi-major axis of 5.19 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.09 and an inclination of 8° with respect to the ecliptic. [4]

    Eurybates family

    Eurybates is the parent body of the small Eurybates family ( 005 ), [7] [8] with 218 known members of carbonaceous and/or primitive composition. [15] :23 Only a few families have been identified among the Jovian asteroids; four of them in the Greek camp. This potentially collisional family was first characterized by Jakub Rozehnal and Miroslav Brož in 2011, and further described in 2014. [19] [20] Members of this family include the Jupiter trojans 5258 Rhoeo, 8060 Anius, 9818 Eurymachos, (163189) 2002 EU6 , (287577) 2003 FE42 and 360072 Alcimedon. [15]

    Physical characteristics

    Eurybates has been characterized as a carbonaceous C-type asteroid by both the Lucy mission team and Brian Warner's Lightcurve Data Base. [5] [10] The overall spectral type for members of the Eurybates family is that of a C- and P-type. [15] :23

    Rotational lightcurves

    In May 1992, a rotational lightcurve of Eurybates was obtained from photometric observations by Stefano Mottola and Maria Gonano–Beurer using the now decommissioned ESO 1-metre telescope at La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. Lightcurve analysis gave a rotation period of 8.711 hours with a brightness variation of 0.20 magnitude ( U=3- ). [5] [13] In October 2010, photometric observations by American astronomer Robert Stephens at the Goat Mountain Astronomical Research Station ( G79 ) in California gave a concurring period of 8.73 hours and an amplitude of 0.19 magnitude ( U=2+ ). [5] [14]

    Eurybates has two determined spin axes at (143.0°, −45.0°) and/or (325.0°, –61.0°) in ecliptic coordinates (λ,β). [10]

    Diameter and albedo

    According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Eurybates measures between 63.89 and 72.14 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.052 and 0.060. [9] [11] [12] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link agrees with IRAS, and derives an albedo of 0.0491 and a diameter of 72.08 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 9.6. [5]

    100+ largest Jupiter trojans
    Largest Jupiter Trojans by survey(A)
    (mean-diameter in kilometers; YoD: Year of Discovery)
    Designation H WISE IRAS Akari Ln RP V–I YoDRef
    624 Hektor 7.2225233230.99L46.920.9301907 list
    617 Patroclus 8.19140.362140.92140.85L5102.800.8301906 list
    911 Agamemnon 7.89131.038166.66185.30L46.590.9801919 list
    588 Achilles 8.67130.099135.47133.22L47.310.9401906 list
    3451 Mentor 8.4126.288116.30117.91L57.700.7701984 list
    3317 Paris 8.3118.790116.26120.45L57.090.9501984 list
    1867 Deiphobus 8.3118.220122.67131.31L558.660.9301971 list
    1172 Äneas 8.33118.020142.82148.66L58.710.9501930 list
    1437 Diomedes 8.3117.786164.31172.60L424.490.8101937 list
    1143 Odysseus 7.93114.624125.64130.81L410.110.8601930 list
    2241 Alcathous 8.64113.682114.63118.87L57.690.9401979 list
    659 Nestor 8.99112.320108.87107.06L415.980.7901908 list
    3793 Leonteus 8.7112.04686.2687.58L45.620.7801985 list
    3063 Makhaon 8.4111.655116.14114.34L48.640.8301983 list
    1583 Antilochus 8.6108.842101.62111.69L431.540.9501950 list
    884 Priamus 8.81101.09396.29119.99L56.860.9001917 list
    1208 Troilus 8.99100.477103.34111.36L556.170.7401931 list
    1173 Anchises 8.8999.549126.27120.49L511.600.7801930 list
    2207 Antenor 8.8997.65885.1191.32L57.970.9501977 list
    2363 Cebriones 9.1195.97681.8484.61L520.050.9101977 list
    4063 Euforbo 8.795.619102.46106.38L48.850.9501989 list
    2357 Phereclos 8.9494.62594.9098.45L514.390.9601981 list
    4709 Ennomos 8.591.43380.8580.03L512.280.6901988 list
    2797 Teucer 8.789.430111.14113.99L410.150.9201981 list
    2920 Automedon 8.888.574111.01113.11L410.210.9501981 list
    15436 Dexius 9.187.64685.7178.63L48.970.8701998 list
    3596 Meriones 9.287.38075.0973.28L412.960.8301985 list
    2893 Peiroos 9.2386.88487.4686.76L58.960.9501975 list
    4086 Podalirius 9.185.49586.8985.98L410.430.8701985 list
    4060 Deipylos 9.384.04379.2186.79L49.300.7601987 list
    1404 Ajax 9.383.99081.6996.34L429.380.9601936 list
    4348 Poulydamas 9.582.03270.0887.51L59.910.8401988 list
    5144 Achates 9.080.95891.9189.85L55.960.9201991 list
    4833 Meges 8.980.16587.3389.39L414.250.9401989 list
    2223 Sarpedon 9.4177.48094.63108.21L522.740.8801977 list
    4489 Dracius 9.076.59592.9395.02L412.580.9501988 list
    2260 Neoptolemus 9.3176.43571.6581.28L48.180.9501975 list
    5254 Ulysses 9.276.14778.3480.00L428.720.9701986 list
    3708 Socus 9.375.66179.5976.75L56.550.9801974 list
    2674 Pandarus 9.174.26798.10101.72L58.481.0001982 list
    3564 Talthybius 9.473.73068.9274.11L440.590.9001985 list
    4834 Thoas 9.172.33186.8296.21L418.190.9501989 list
    7641 Cteatus 9.471.83968.9775.28L427.770.9801986 list
    3540 Protesilaos 9.370.22576.8487.66L48.950.9401973 list
    11395 Iphinous 9.868.97764.7167.78L417.381998 list
    4035 Thestor 9.668.73368.2366.99L413.470.9701986 list
    5264 Telephus 9.468.47273.2681.38L49.530.9701991 list
    1868 Thersites 9.568.16370.0878.89L410.480.9601960 list
    9799 Thronium 9.668.03364.8772.42L421.520.9101996 list
    4068 Menestheus 9.567.62562.3768.46L414.400.9501973 list
    23135 Pheidas 9.966.23058.2968.50L48.690.8602000 list
    2456 Palamedes 9.365.91691.6699.60L47.240.9201966 list
    3709 Polypoites 9.165.29799.0985.23L410.041.0001985 list
    1749 Telamon 9.564.89881.0669.14L416.980.9701949 list
    3548 Eurybates 9.663.88572.1468.40L48.710.7301973 list
    4543 Phoinix 9.763.83662.7969.54L438.871.2001989 list
    12444 Prothoon 9.863.83564.3162.41L515.821996 list
    4836 Medon 9.563.27767.7378.70L49.820.9201989 list
    16070 Charops 9.763.19164.1368.98L520.240.9601999 list
    15440 Eioneus 9.662.51966.4871.88L421.430.9701998 list
    4715 Medesicaste 9.762.09763.9165.93L58.810.8501989 list
    34746 Thoon 9.861.68460.5163.63L519.630.9502001 list
    38050 Bias 9.861.60361.0450.44L418.850.9901998 list
    5130 Ilioneus 9.760.71159.4052.49L514.770.9601989 list
    5027 Androgeos 9.659.78657.86n.a.L411.380.9101988 list
    6090 Aulis 9.459.56874.5381.92L418.480.9801989 list
    5648 Axius 9.759.29563.91n.a.L537.560.9001990 list
    7119 Hiera 9.759.15076.4077.29L44000.9501989 list
    4805 Asteropaios 10.057.64753.1643.44L512.371990 list
    16974 Iphthime 9.857.34155.4357.15L478.90.9601998 list
    4867 Polites 9.857.25158.2964.29L511.241.0101989 list
    2895 Memnon 10.056.70655.67n.a.L57.500.7101981 list
    4708 Polydoros 9.954.96455.67n.a.L57.520.9601988 list
    (21601) 1998 XO89 10.054.90955.6756.08L412.650.9701998 list
    12929 Periboea 9.954.07761.0455.34L59.270.8801999 list
    17492 Hippasos 10.053.97555.67n.a.L517.751991 list
    5652 Amphimachus 10.153.92153.1652.48L48.371.0501992 list
    2759 Idomeneus 9.953.67661.0152.55L432.380.9101980 list
    5258 Rhoeo 10.253.27550.77n.a.L419.851.0101989 list
    (12126) 1999 RM11 10.153.202n.a.n.a.L5n.a. ?1999 list
    (15502) 1999 NV27 10.053.10055.6750.86L515.130.8751999 list
    4754 Panthoos 10.053.02553.1556.96L527.681977 list
    4832 Palinurus 10.052.05853.16n.a.L55.321.0001988 list
    5126 Achaemenides 10.551.92244.2248.57L453.021989 list
    3240 Laocoon 10.251.69550.77n.a.L511.310.8801978 list
    4902 Thessandrus 9.851.26361.0471.79L47380.9601989 list
    11552 Boucolion 10.151.13653.1653.91L532.441993 list
    (20729) 1999 XS143 10.450.96146.30n.a.L45.721.0001999 list
    (6545) 1986 TR6 10.150.95153.16n.a.L416.260.9101986 list
    4792 Lykaon 10.150.87053.16n.a.L540.090.9601988 list
    21900 Orus 10.050.81055.6753.87L413.450.9501999 list
    1873 Agenor 10.150.79953.7654.38L520.601971 list
    5028 Halaesus 10.250.77050.77n.a.L424.940.9001988 list
    2146 Stentor 9.950.75558.29n.a.L416.401976 list
    4722 Agelaos 10.050.37853.1659.47L518.440.9101977 list
    5284 Orsilocus 10.150.15953.16n.a.L410.310.9701989 list
    11509 Thersilochos 10.149.96053.1656.23L517.371990 list
    5285 Krethon 10.149.60658.5352.61L412.041.0901989 list
    4791 Iphidamas 10.149.52857.8559.96L59.701.0301988 list
    9023 Mnesthus 10.149.15150.7760.80L530.661988 list
    5283 Pyrrhus 9.748.35664.5869.93L47.320.9501989 list
    4946 Askalaphus 10.248.20952.7166.10L422.730.9401988 list
    (22149) 2000 WD49 10.248.19050.7750.37L47.841.0902000 list
    (32496) 2000 WX182 10.248.01750.7751.63L523.340.9502000 list
    5120 Bitias 10.247.98750.77n.a.L515.210.7801988 list
    12714 Alkimos 10.147.81961.0454.62L428.481991 list
    (7352) 1994 CO 9.947.73155.67 47.07L56480.8501994 list
    1870 Glaukos 10.647.64942.23n.a.L55.991971 list
    4138 Kalchas 10.146.46253.1661.04L429.20.8101973 list
    (23958) 1998 VD30 10.246.00150.7747.91L45620.9901998 list
    4828 Misenus 10.445.95446.30 43.22L512.870.9201988 list
    4057 Demophon 10.145.68353.16n.a.L429.821.0601985 list
    4501 Eurypylos 10.445.52446.30n.a.L46.051989 list
    4007 Euryalos 10.345.51548.4853.89L46.391973 list
    5259 Epeigeus 10.344.74142.5944.42L418.421989 list
    30705 Idaios 10.444.54646.30n.a.L515.741977 list
    16560 Daitor 10.743.86151.4243.38L51991 list
    (15977) 1998 MA11 10.443.53046.3051.53L52500.9061998 list
    7543 Prylis 10.642.89342.23n.a.L417.801973 list
    4827 Dares 10.542.77044.22n.a.L519.001988 list
    1647 Menelaus 10.542.71644.22n.a.L417.740.8661957 list
    (A) Used sources: WISE/NEOWISE catalog (NEOWISE_DIAM_V1 PDS, Grav, 2012); IRAS data (SIMPS v.6 catalog); and Akari catalog (Usui, 2011); RP: rotation period and V–I (color index) taken from the LCDB

    Note: missing data was completed with figures from the JPL SBDB (query) and from the LCDB (query form) for the WISE/NEOWISE and SIMPS catalogs, respectively. These figures are given in italics. Also, listing is incomplete above #100.

    Naming

    This minor planet was named after Eurybates, the Ancient hero from Greek mythology, who was a herald for the Greek armies during the Trojan War. [3] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 28 April 1991 ( M.P.C. 18138). [21]

    Lucy mission target

    Animation of Lucy's trajectory around Sun

.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}
Lucy *
Sun *
Earth *
52246 Donaldjohanson  *
3548 Eurybates *
21900 Orus *
617 Patroclus Animation of Lucy's trajectory around Sun.gif
    Animation of Lucy's trajectory around Sun
      Lucy ·   Sun ·   Earth ·   52246 Donaldjohanson  ·  3548 Eurybates ·   21900 Orus ·   617 Patroclus

    Eurybates is planned to be visited by the Lucy spacecraft which will launch in 2021. The fly by is scheduled for 12 August 2027, and will approach the asteroid to a distance of 1000 kilometers at a velocity of 5.8 kilometers per second and a solar phase angle of 81°. [10]

    Satellite

    Discovery images of Queta taken by Hubble on 12-14 September 2018 Eurybates-satellite-discovery.gif
    Discovery images of Queta taken by Hubble on 12–14 September 2018

    Eurybates has one known satellite, named Queta after Mexican Olympic athlete Enriqueta Basilio. [22] Provisionally designated S/2018 (3548) 1, the satellite was discovered by Keith S. Noll and colleagues in images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in September 2018. [23] [24] Subsequent follow-up observations later confirmed the satellite's existence, and the discovery was announced on 9 January 2020. The satellite was given the name Queta on 15 October 2020, in accordance with the International Astronomical Union's Olympic athlete naming convention for small Jupiter trojans ( H >12). In the naming citation, Enriqueta Basilio was recognized as the first woman torchbearer at the 1968 Summer Olympics, analogous to the role of heralds like Eurybates. [22]

    Queta is very dim, with an apparent magnitude of ~26.77. It is at least 6,000 times fainter than Eurybates, suggesting that it is likely very small in size, less than 1 km (0.62 mi) in diameter. [25] Assuming that Queta has the same albedo as Eurybates, its diameter would be 0.8±0.2 km. [23] The satellite has an orbital period of 82.6±0.4 days, with a semi-major axis of 2,310 ± 100 km (1,435 ± 62 mi) and low eccentricity of 0.05±0.05. [22] It is probably a fragment of Eurybates since it is part of a known collisional family. [26] The presence of the satellite does not pose any adverse effects on the Lucy mission, though it provides an additional object for the spacecraft to study during its flyby in 2027. [25] [26]

    Related Research Articles

    1647 Menelaus is a mid-sized Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 42 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 23 June 1957 by American astronomer Seth Nicholson at the Palomar Observatory in California, and later named after the Spartan King Menelaus from Greek mythology. The dark asteroid has a rotation period of 17.7 hours. It is the principal body of the proposed Menelaus cluster, which encompasses several, mostly tentative Jovian asteroid families.

    1868 Thersites is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 70 kilometers in diameter. Discovered during the Palomar–Leiden survey at Palomar in 1960, it was later named after the warrior Thersites from Greek mythology. The presumed carbonaceous C-type asteroid belongs to the 50 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 10.48 hours.

    4722 Agelaos is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey at the Palomar Observatory in California in 1977. The Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 18.4 hours and belongs to the 90 largest Jupiter trojans. It was named after Agelaus from Greek mythology.

    1873 Agenor

    1873 Agenor is a dark Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1971, and later named after Agenor from Greek mythology. The dark Jovian asteroid belongs to the 100 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 20.60 hours.

    37519 Amphios is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 33 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered at the Palomar Observatory during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1977. The dark Jovian asteroid is a member of an unnamed asteroid family and has a long rotation period of 50.9 hours. It was named after Amphius from Greek mythology.

    1867 Deiphobus is a dark Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 123 kilometers (76 mi) in diameter. It was discovered on 3 March 1971, by Argentine astronomers Carlos Cesco and A. G. Samuel at the Leoncito Astronomical Complex in Argentina, and later named after the Trojan prince Deiphobus from Greek mythology. The dark D-type asteroid is one of the largest Jupiter trojans. It is a member of the Ennomos family and has a long rotation period of 58.66 hours.

    4709 Ennomos

    4709 Ennomos is a large Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp and the namesake of the small Ennomos family, approximately 81 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 12 October 1988, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The relatively bright and possibly elongated Jovian asteroid belongs to the 40 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 12.3 hours. It was named after Ennomus (Ennomos), a Trojan warrior killed by Achilles.

    5259 Epeigeus is a mid-sized Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 44 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 30 January 1989, by American astronomer couple Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The D-type asteroid has a rotation period of 18.4 hours. It was named after the Myrmidon hero Epeigeus from Greek mythology.

    4007 Euryalos is a larger Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 48 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California. The likely spherical Jovian asteroid is the principal body of the proposed Euryalos family and has a rotation period of 6.4 hours. It was named after the warrior Euryalus from Greek mythology.

    7119 Hiera

    7119 Hiera is a large Jupiter trojan and potentially slow rotator from the Greek camp, approximately 70 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 January 1989, by American astronomer couple Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at Palomar Observatory in California. The dark Jovian asteroid belongs to the 60 largest Jupiter trojans and has an estimated rotation period of at least 400 hours. It was named for the Amazon Hiera, who fought against the Greeks in the Trojan War. As with 624 Hektor, the naming for this Jovian asteroid was placed into the wrong camp.

    4138 Kalchas is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California. The assumed C-type asteroid is the principal body of the proposed Kalchas family and has a rotation period of 29.2 hours. It was named after the seer Calchas from Greek mythology.

    3793 Leonteus is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 90 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 October 1985, by American astronomer couple Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The D-type Jovian asteroid belongs to the 30 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 5.6 hours. It was named after the hero Leonteus from Greek mythology.

    4836 Medon is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 68 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 2 February 1989, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The dark asteroid has a rotation period of 9.82 hours and belongs to the 60 largest Jupiter trojans. It was named after the mythological Greek warrior Medon.

    4068 Menestheus is a dark Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 67 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The D-type asteroid belongs to the 60 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 14.4 hours. It was named after the Athen leader Menestheus from Greek mythology.

    4754 Panthoos is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey on 16 October 1977, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California. It is likely spherical in shape and has a longer-than-average rotation period of 27.68 hours. The assumed C-type asteroid is one of the 80 largest Jupiter trojans. It was named after Panthous (Panthoos) from Greek mythology.

    5283 Pyrrhus

    5283 Pyrrhus is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 65 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 31 January 1989, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The dark Jovian asteroid belongs to the 100 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 7.3 hours. It was named after Achilles son, Neoptolemus from Greek mythology.

    5258 Rhoeo, provisional designation: 1989 AU1, is a Jupiter trojan and member of the Eurybates family from the Greek camp, approximately 53 kilometers (33 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 1 January 1989, by Japanese astronomer Yoshiaki Oshima at the Gekko Observatory, east of Shizuoka, Japan. The assumed C-type asteroid belongs to the 90 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 19.9 hours. It was named from Greek mythology after Rhoeo, lover of Apollo and mother of his son Anius.

    6090 Aulis, provisional designation: 1989 DJ, is a Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 70 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 27 February 1989, by Belgian astronomer Henri Debehogne at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The dark Jovian asteroid belongs to the 50 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 18.5 hours. It was named for the ancient Greek port Aulis, mentioned in the Iliad.

    21900 Orus

    21900 Orus is a Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter, and a target of the Lucy mission to be visited in November 2028. The dark Jovian asteroid belongs to the 100 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 13.5 hours. It was discovered on 9 November 1999, by Japanese amateur astronomer Takao Kobayashi at his private Ōizumi Observatory in Gunma Prefecture, Japan, and later named Orus after a slain Achaean warrior from the Iliad.

    9799 Thronium, provisional designation: 1996 RJ, is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp and the parent body of a small, unnamed asteroid family (006), approximately 68 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 8 September 1996, by American astronomer Timothy Spahr at the Catalina Station of the Steward Observatory near Tucson, Arizona, in the United States. The assumed C-type asteroid belongs to the 50 largest Jupiter trojans and has a relatively long rotation period of 21.52 hours. It was named for the ancient Greek city of Thronium mentioned in the Iliad.

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