Barnesville, Ohio

Last updated
Barnesville, Ohio
KingPumpkin.jpg
King Pumpkin of the Barnesville Pumpkin Festival in 2008
Motto: 
"Where History Meets Progress"
OHMap-doton-Barnesville.png
Location of Barnesville, Ohio
Map of Belmont County Ohio Highlighting Barnesville Village.png
Location of Barnesville in Belmont County
Coordinates: 39°59′17″N81°10′32″W / 39.98806°N 81.17556°W / 39.98806; -81.17556 Coordinates: 39°59′17″N81°10′32″W / 39.98806°N 81.17556°W / 39.98806; -81.17556
Country United States
State Ohio
County Belmont
EstablishedNovember 8th 1808
Government
   Mayor Dale Bunting
   Founder James Barnes & David Barnes
Area
[1]
  Total2.08 sq mi (5.38 km2)
  Land2.05 sq mi (5.31 km2)
  Water0.03 sq mi (0.07 km2)
Elevation
[2]
1,270 ft (387 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total4,008
  Density1,955.12/sq mi (754.76/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
43713
Area code 740
FIPS code 39-03926 [3]
GNIS feature ID1064381 [2]
Website Barnesville Ohio

Barnesville is a village in Belmont County, Ohio, United States. It is located in the central portion of Warren Township in Belmont County and is part of the Wheeling, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 4,193 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

The town was named after James Barnes, who was the first settler. [4] Barnes was born in Montgomery County, Maryland and was married to Nancy Harrison, "an intelligent Quaker lady".[ citation needed ] Barnes owned a farm in Montgomery County, and later laid out a town there, also known as Barnesville, Maryland, where he operated a country store for a while.

In 1803 he moved to St. Clairsville, Ohio where he operated a tavern and general store. In 1806 Barnes settled in Warren Township in Belmont County where he cleared forest, built a house, established a tannery and general store and planted orchards. In November 1808, the town of Barnesville was laid out, and four years later Mr. Barnes and his family became permanent residents of the new village. [5] Barnesville was described in 1833 as having six stores and a steam mill. [6]

Barnesville was incorporated as a village in 1835. [7]

Geography

Barnesville is located at 39°59′17″N81°10′32″W / 39.988129°N 81.175483°W / 39.988129; -81.175483 . [8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.95 square miles (5.05 km2), of which, 1.94 square miles (5.02 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water. [9]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 291
1830 40840.2%
1840 70071.6%
1850 82317.6%
1860 1,15740.6%
1870 2,06378.3%
1880 2,43518.0%
1890 3,20731.7%
1900 3,72116.0%
1910 4,23313.8%
1920 4,86514.9%
1930 4,602−5.4%
1940 5,0028.7%
1950 4,665−6.7%
1960 4,425−5.1%
1970 4,292−3.0%
1980 4,6337.9%
1990 4,326−6.6%
2000 4,225−2.3%
2010 4,193−0.8%
2020 4,008−4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

2010 census

As of the census [11] of 2010, there were 4,193 people, 1,763 households, and 1,114 families living in the village. The population density was 2,161.3 inhabitants per square mile (834.5/km2). There were 2,011 housing units at an average density of 1,036.6 per square mile (400.2/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.0% White, 0.9% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.3% Asian, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.6% of the population.

There were 1,763 households, of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.8% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the village was 41.4 years. 21.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.5% were from 45 to 64; and 20.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 46.2% male and 53.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census [3] of 2000, there were 4,225 people, 1,769 households, and 1,119 families living in the village. The population density was 2,196.6 people per square mile (849.6/km2). There were 1,964 housing units at an average density of 1,021.1 per square mile (395.0/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.41% White, 0.71% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.17% Asian, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.26% of the population.

There were 1,769 households, out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.5% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the village, the population was spread out, with 23.6% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 20.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 82.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.4 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $23,925, and the median income for a family was $31,927. Males had a median income of $25,098 versus $16,119 for females. The per capita income for the village was $14,105. About 21.2% of families and 22.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.1% of those under age 18 and 14.6% of those age 65 or over.

Art and Culture

The Belmont County Victorian Mansion Museum is located in Barnesville. The museum includes twenty-six rooms restored to the Victorian era. [12]

The village is the host of the Barnesville Pumpkin Festival every September, attracting tourists from the area.

Education

The village of Barnesville is served by the Barnesville Exempted Village School District. The village's schools saw a renovation in 2002 to improve and expand classroom learning and appearances.

There are three main schools in the village: Barnesville Elementary School, Barnesville Middle School, and Barnesville High School.

Also located in the village is Olney Friends School, a small co-educational boarding high school affiliated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

Notable people

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References

  1. "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 20, 2022.
  2. 1 2 "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. Overman, William Daniel (1958). Ohio Town Names. Akron, OH: Atlantic Press. p. 9.
  5. "Dist.PDF" (PDF).
  6. Kilbourn, John (1833). The Ohio Gazetteer, Or a Topographical Dictionary. Scott and Wright. pp.  84 . Retrieved 12 December 2013.
  7. McKelvey, A. T. (1903). Centennial History of Belmont County, Ohio, and Representative Citizens. Biographical Publishing Company. pp.  221.
  8. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  10. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  12. "Belmont County Victorian Mansion Museum". The Belmont County Historical Society. Archived from the original on 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2012-06-07.