Digea

Last updated
Digea
Type Broadcaster (Television)
Country
AvailabilityGreece
OwnerDigital Provider S.A.
Launch date
24 September 2009
Official website
Official website

Digea is a Greek network operator that provides a digital terrestrial television system in Greece for seven nationwide free-to-air channels (Alpha TV, Alter Channel, ANT1, Makedonia TV, Mega Channel, Skai TV and Star Channel). [1] In addition to these free-to-air nationwide stations, the network is open to any other station choosing to use its services.

Contents

The name Digea is a word play in Greek: composed of the words "Digital" and "Gaea" (the Greek name for Gaia, the ancient goddess who was the personification of the Earth), literally translated as "Digital Earth". It symbolizes a union of the digital era and the basis for life in our world. The company’s main area of activity is the provision of networking and multiplexing services, both to the above-mentioned shareholders as well as to any legal entity opting to use the company’s services.

Time line

TV Channels

DIGEA Multiplex

  1. Alpha TV - private national scale television station
  2. Alter Channel - currently off the air
  3. ANT1 - private national scale television station
  4. Makedonia TV - private national scale television station
  5. Mega Channel - private national scale television station
  6. Open TV - private national scale television station (formerly Epsilon & 902 TV television station, affiliated to the Communist Party of Greece, the television station along with the relevant broadcast license was sold by the party to a private company called A-Horizon Media Ltd, [2] and hence no longer has any affiliation to the party)
  7. Skai TV - private national scale television station
  8. Star Channel - private national scale television station
  9. Action 24 - private regional scale television station of Galatsi - Attica
  10. Attica TV - private regional scale television station of Aspropyrgos - Attica
  11. Blue Sky - private regional scale television station of Irakleio - Attica
  12. Channel 9 - private regional scale television station of Paiania - Attica
  13. Extra Channel - private regional scale television station of Peristeri - Attica
  14. ART - political party LAOS national scale television station started only in Kallithea - Attica
  15. High TV - private regional scale television station of Athens - Attica
  16. Kontra Channel - private regional scale television station of Tavros - Attica
  17. MAD TV - private regional scale television station of Pallini - Attica
  18. New Epsilon TV - private regional scale television station of Peristeri - Attica
  19. Alert TV - private regional scale television station of Tavros - Attica
  20. Nickelodeon - private regional scale television station of Irakleio and national cable, satellite and IPTV channel - Attica
  21. RISE TV - private regional scale television station of Irakleio - Attica
  22. Smile TV - private regional scale television station of Rizoupoli - Attica

See also

Notes

  1. "NEC supplies Greek Digital Network Operator Digea with DVB-T Transmitters". NEC. February 1, 2010. Retrieved 2014-09-18.
  2. KKE: Κυπριακή εταιρεία αγόρασε τον 902

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