Don't Get Me Wrong (film)

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Don't Get Me Wrong
"Don't Get Me Wrong" (1937).jpg
Australian daybill poster
Directed by Arthur B. Woods
Reginald Purdell
Written by Frank Launder
Reginald Purdell
Brock Williams
Produced by Irving Asher
Starring Max Miller
George E. Stone
Olive Blakeney
Cinematography Basil Emmott
Robert LaPresle
Edited byArthur Ridout
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Brothers
Release date
March 1937
Running time
80 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Don't Get Me Wrong is a 1937 British comedy film co-directed by Arthur B. Woods and Reginald Purdell and starring Max Miller and George E. Stone. [1] It was made at Teddington Studios with sets designed by Peter Proud. [2] The film was made by the British subsidiary of Warner Brothers, made on a considerably higher budget than many of the quota quickies the studios usually produced.

Contents

Unlike several of Miller's Teddington films which are now lost, this still survives.

Synopsis

Miller plays a fairground performer who meets a professor who claims to have invented a cheap substitute for petrol. They team up and persuade a millionaire to finance them to develop and market the product, while unsavoury elements are keen to steal the formula and try all means to get their hands on it, involving slapstick chases and double-crosses. It then turns out that the miracle fluid is diluted coconut oil, and the genius professor is an escaped lunatic. The millionaire finds himself taking the brunt of the disappointment.

Main cast

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References

  1. "Don't Get Me Wrong (1936) - BFI". BFI. Archived from the original on 13 July 2012.
  2. Wood p.89

Bibliography