Education in Tonga

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Education in Tonga is compulsory for children through the end of high school. [1] In 1995, the gross primary enrolment rate was 122.2 percent[ clarification needed ], and the net primary enrolment rate was 95.3 percent. [1] Primary school attendance rates were unavailable for Tonga as of 2001. [1] While enrolment rates indicate a level of commitment to education, they do not always reflect children’s participation in school. 98.5% of students in Tonga attend schools while the other 2% are either living in remote areas without certain schools, such as in the Niua group, or they do not have enough funds to pay for their enrolment. There are about twenty institutions for higher education (including universities), 22 high schools, and around 95 primary schools including pre-schools in different villages around Tonga.

Contents

Tongans have one the highest rates of PhDs per head of population and are proud of the body of academic knowledge created by Tongan scholars. [2] A collection of every PhD and Masters dissertation written by any Tongan, the Kukū Kaunaka Collection, is held at the University of the South Pacific and administered by Seu'ula Johansson-Fua. [2]

See also

Schools in Tonga

Educational Institutions in Tonga

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Tonga" Archived 2007-09-23 at the Wayback Machine . 2001 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor. Bureau of International Labor Affairs, U.S. Department of Labor (2002). This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. 1 2 "King Tupou VI commissions Kukū Kaunaka Collection". Matangitonga. 2018-11-28. Retrieved 2020-06-15.