Notchback

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The three-box, notchback design of the Fiat 124 Coupe Three box notchback Fiat 124.jpg
The three-box, notchback design of the Fiat 124 Coupé
A three-box liftback in notchback form--with its vestigial third box, the European Ford Escort Hatchback three box.jpg
A three-box liftback in notchback form—with its vestigial third box, the European Ford Escort

A notchback is a category of car characterized as having a three-box design where the trunk (boot) volume is less pronounced than the engine and passenger compartments.

Contents

Many models of sedans, coupés or hatchbacks could be classified as notchbacks, however the category has limited salience outside of American car manufacturers distinguishing the three-box models from other body styles in the same model range. For example, the Chevrolet Vega range included both a notchback coupe and a fastback coupe.

North America

1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special 1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special rl.jpg
1939 Cadillac Series 60 Special

One of the first cars marketed as a notchback is the 1938 Cadillac Sixty Special. [1] [2] [3]

In 1952, a notchback version of the Nash Ambassador was introduced. [4]

In 1971, Chevrolet marketed the three-box sedan models of the Chevrolet Vega as a notchback in order to differentiate them from the fastback Vega models. [5] [6] For the 1973 model year, the car's name was changed to "Vega Notchback". [7]

English-speaking countries

While many car models have notchback characteristics, the category is largely unused outside of North America, with their body style being described using other terms. For example, a three-box sedan [8] is more generally known as a "saloon" in British English. [9] "Notchback" has appeared in a few British English publications, however it is not a term that is used in common parlance in Britain. [10] [11]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Pontiac Sunbird

The Pontiac Sunbird is a small car manufactured and marketed by Pontiac over two generations.

Sedan (automobile)

A sedan, or saloon, is a passenger car in a three-box configuration with separate compartments for engine, passenger, and cargo.

Oldsmobile Cutlass American car model

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Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

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Buick Century Line of upscale performance cars

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Volkswagen Type 3 Compact car built from 1961–1973

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Chevrolet Vega Subcompact automobile

The Chevrolet Vega is a subcompact automobile that was manufactured and marketed by GM's Chevrolet subdivision from 1970 to 1977. Available in two-door hatchback, notchback, wagon, and sedan delivery body styles, all models were powered by an inline four-cylinder engine with a lightweight, aluminum alloy cylinder block. The Vega first went on sale in Chevrolet dealerships on September 10, 1970. Variants included the Cosworth Vega, a short-lived limited-production performance model, introduced in the spring of 1975.

Chevrolet Citation

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Hardtop

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Fastback

A fastback is an automotive styling feature which is defined by the rear of the car having a single slope from the roof to the rear bumper.

Liftback

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Opel Commodore

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Cadillac Series 61

The Cadillac Series 61 replaced the Series 60/65 in Cadillac's 1939 model range. It in turn was replaced by the Series 62 in 1940 only to return to production in model year 1941. Apart from model years 1943–1945 It remained in production through 1951.

The GM A platform (1936) was a rear wheel drive automobile platform designation used by General Motors from at least 1936 until 1959, and again from 1964 to 1981. In 1982, GM introduced a new front wheel drive A platform, and existing intermediate rear wheel drive products were redesignated as G-bodies.

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Opera window

An opera window is a small fixed window usually behind the rear side window of an automobile. They are typically mounted in the C-pillar of some cars. The design feature was popular during the 1970s and early 1980s that was adopted by domestic U.S. manufacturers most often with a vinyl roof.

Brougham (car body)

A brougham was originally a car body style where the driver sat outside and passengers seated within an enclosed cabin, as per the earlier brougham horse-drawn carriage. Similar in style to the later town car, the brougham style was used on chauffeur-driven petrol and electric cars.

Pontiac Torpedo

The Pontiac Torpedo was a full-sized car produced by Pontiac from the 1940 through the 1948 model year. When released, it was the biggest Pontiac, used an 8-cylinder engine, and it had more standard features than other Pontiacs. Although the Torpedo name was exclusive to the highest line of Pontiacs in 1940, in 1941 the name was applied to all Pontiacs in three separate lines. The Custom Torpedoes were now top of the line name, while the DeLuxe Torpedo became the base line, and the Streamline Torpedo became the middle line of Pontiacs. All Torpedo models could be had with either a 6-cylinder or 8-cylinder engine beginning in 1941. From 1942 to 1948 the Torpedo name designated only the base line of Pontiacs. The Torpedo was replaced by the Pontiac Chieftain in 1949.

References

  1. "1940, The Cadillac Sixty Sets Another Styling Trend". General Motors: Generations of GM Wiki Timeline. Archived from the original on 17 August 2011. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  2. "1938-'40 Cadillac Sixty Special". www.hemmings.com. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  3. "Take Me to Your Style Leader: The 1938–1942 Cadillac Sixty Special". www.ateupwithmotor.com. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  4. Gunnell, John (1992). Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1946-1975. Krause Publications. p. 468. ISBN   9780873412049 . Retrieved 7 December 2017. There was new styling for the Ambassador and Statesman. A new notch back body created by Italy's Pininfarina was the fashion hit of the marque's 50th year
  5. "Chevrolutionary! - 1973 Chevrolet Vega GT Millionth Edition, 1976 Chevrolet Cosworth Vega". www.hemmings.com. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  6. "How the Chevy Vega Nearly Destroyed GM". www.popularmechanics.com. Retrieved 16 June 2018.
  7. Chevrolet Vega brochures- years 1971–77. Chevrolet.
  8. "sedan". Chambers 21st Century Dictionary. Retrieved 18 April 2017.
  9. "saloon". Chambers 21st Century Dictionary. Retrieved 18 April 2017.
  10. Stevenson, Angus; Waite, Maurice, eds. (2011). "notchback". Concise Oxford English Dictionary (Luxury ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 978. ISBN   9780199601110. a car with a back that extends approximately horizontally from the bottom of the rear window so as to make a distinct angle with it.
  11. Barnard, R.H. (1996). Road Vehicle Aerodynamic Design. Longman. ISBN   978-0-582-24522-8.