Oilville, West Virginia

Last updated
Oilville
Unincorporated community
USA West Virginia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Oilville
Location within the state of West Virginia
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Oilville
Oilville (the US)
Coordinates: 37°43′40″N82°2′13″W / 37.72778°N 82.03694°W / 37.72778; -82.03694 Coordinates: 37°43′40″N82°2′13″W / 37.72778°N 82.03694°W / 37.72778; -82.03694
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Logan
Elevation 1,063 ft (324 m)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
  Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
GNIS ID 1742588 [1]

Oilville is an unincorporated community in Logan County, West Virginia.

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Logan County, West Virginia County in the United States

Logan County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,743. Its county seat is Logan. The county was formed in 1824 from parts of Giles, Tazewell, Cabell, and Kanawha counties. It is named for Chief Logan, famous Native American chief of the Mingo tribe.

West Virginia State of the United States of America

West Virginia is a state located in the Appalachian region in the Southern United States that is also considered to be a part of the Middle Atlantic States. It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest. West Virginia is the 41st largest state by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston.

Related Research Articles

Sam Snead American golfer

Samuel Jackson Snead was an American professional golfer who was one of the top players in the world for the better part of four decades and one of the greatest players of all time. Snead won a record 82 PGA Tour events, including seven majors. He never won the U.S. Open, though he was runner-up four times.

Charleston, West Virginia Capital of West Virginia

Charleston is the most populous city in, and the capital of, the U.S. state of West Virginia. Located at the confluence of the Elk and Kanawha rivers, the population during the 2017 Census Estimate was 47,929. The Charleston metropolitan area as a whole had 214,406 residents. Charleston is the center of government, commerce, and industry for Kanawha County, of which it is the county seat.

Goochland County, Virginia County in Virginia, United States

Goochland County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its southern border is formed by the James River. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,717. Its county seat is Goochland.

Shenandoah Valley valley and cultural region of western Virginia and the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia in the United States

The Shenandoah Valley is a geographic valley and cultural region of western Virginia and the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia in the United States. The valley is bounded to the east by the Blue Ridge Mountains, to the west by the eastern front of the Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians, to the north by the Potomac River and to the south by the James River. The cultural region covers a larger area that includes all of the valley plus the Virginia highlands to the west, and the Roanoke Valley to the south. It is physiographically located within the Ridge and Valley province and is a portion of the Great Appalachian Valley.

West Virginia University public university in Morgantown, West Virginia, United States

West Virginia University (WVU) is a public, land-grant, space-grant, research-intensive university in Morgantown, West Virginia, United States. Its other campuses include the West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Beckley and Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a second clinical campus for the University's medical and dental schools at Charleston Area Medical Center in Charleston. WVU Extension Service provides outreach with offices in all of West Virginia's 55 counties. Since 2001, WVU has been governed by the West Virginia University Board of Governors.

Woodlawn may refer to:

Virginia State Route 5 highway in Virginia

State Route 5 runs between the independent cities of Richmond and Williamsburg in the U.S. state of Virginia. Between Charles City County and James City County, it crosses the Chickahominy River via the Judith Stewart Dresser Bridge, a fixed-span bridge which replaced historic Barrett's Ferry and the former drawbridge.

National Register of Historic Places listings in West Virginia Wikimedia list article

This is a list of properties and historic districts in West Virginia that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are listings in every one of West Virginia's 55 counties.

U.S. Route 15 in Virginia highway in Virginia

U.S. Route 15 is a part of the U.S. Highway System that runs from Walterboro, South Carolina to Painted Post, New York. In Virginia, the U.S. Highway runs 230.37 miles (370.74 km) from the North Carolina state line near Clarksville north to the Maryland state line at the Potomac River near Lucketts. US 15 is a major north–south highway through the Piedmont of Virginia, connecting Clarksville and Farmville in Southside Virginia with Culpeper, Warrenton, and Leesburg in Northern Virginia.

U.S. Route 250 in Virginia highway in Virginia

U.S. Route 250 is a part of the U.S. Highway System that runs from Sandusky, Ohio to Richmond, Virginia. In Virginia, the U.S. Highway runs 166.74 miles (268.34 km) from the West Virginia state line near Hightown east to its eastern terminus at US 360 in Richmond. US 250 is the main east–west highway of Highland County, which is known as Virginia's Little Switzerland; the highway follows the path of the 19th century Staunton and Parkersburg Turnpike. From Staunton east to Richmond, the U.S. Highway serves as the local complement to Interstate 64 (I-64), roughly following the 18th century Three Notch'd Road through Waynesboro and Charlottesville on its way through the Shenandoah Valley, its crossing of the Blue Ridge Mountains at Rockfish Gap, and the Piedmont. In the Richmond metropolitan area, US 250 is known as Broad Street, a major thoroughfare through the city's West End and downtown areas.

Huntington–Ashland metropolitan area Metropolitan area in the United States

The Huntington–Ashland metropolitan area is the largest metropolitan statistical area in West Virginia and includes seven counties across three states: West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio. New definitions from February 28, 2013 placed the population at 361,580. The MSA is nestled along the banks of the Ohio River within the Appalachian Plateau region. The area is referred to locally as the "Tri-State area". In addition, the three largest cities are referred to as the River Cities.

Oilville, Virginia Unincorporated community in Virginia, United States

Oilville is an unincorporated community in Goochland County, Virginia, United States. Oilville is located on U.S. Route 250 22 miles (35 km) west-northwest of Richmond. Oilville has a post office with ZIP code 23129.

Oilville may refer to:

Woodlawn (Oilville, Virginia)

Woodlawn is a historic home located near Oilville, Goochland County, Virginia. It is dated to the late 18th century, and is a two-story, five-bay brick structure in the Federal style. It has a small porch supported on four evenly spaced square columns with Ionic order capitals added around 1810. A one-story frame kitchen and a long frame porch were both added in 1937.

References