Orville, West Virginia

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Orville
Unincorporated community
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Orville
Location within the state of West Virginia
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Orville
Orville (the US)
Coordinates: 37°48′51″N81°53′31″W / 37.81417°N 81.89194°W / 37.81417; -81.89194 Coordinates: 37°48′51″N81°53′31″W / 37.81417°N 81.89194°W / 37.81417; -81.89194
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Logan
Elevation 830 ft (250 m)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
  Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
GNIS ID 1544448 [1]

Orville is an unincorporated community in Logan County, West Virginia.

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Logan County, West Virginia County in the United States

Logan County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,743. Its county seat is Logan. The county was formed in 1824 from parts of Giles, Tazewell, Cabell, and Kanawha counties. It is named for Chief Logan, famous Native American chief of the Mingo tribe.

West Virginia State of the United States of America

West Virginia is a state located in the Appalachian region in the Southern United States that is also considered to be a part of the Middle Atlantic States. It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest. West Virginia is the 41st largest state by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston.

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