Lyburn, West Virginia

Last updated
Lyburn
Unincorporated community
USA West Virginia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Lyburn
Location within the state of West Virginia
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Lyburn
Lyburn (the US)
Coordinates: 37°48′7″N81°55′52″W / 37.80194°N 81.93111°W / 37.80194; -81.93111 Coordinates: 37°48′7″N81°55′52″W / 37.80194°N 81.93111°W / 37.80194; -81.93111
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Logan
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
  Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
GNIS feature ID 1555011 [1]

Lyburn is an unincorporated mining community in Logan County, West Virginia, United States. Lyburn is also the home of the Bearwallow trailhead for the Hatfield-Mccoy ATV trail.

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Logan County, West Virginia County in the United States

Logan County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 36,743. Its county seat is Logan. The county was formed in 1824 from parts of Giles, Tazewell, Cabell, and Kanawha counties. It is named for Chief Logan, famous Native American chief of the Mingo tribe.

West Virginia State of the United States of America

West Virginia is a state located in the Appalachian region in the Southern United States that is also considered to be a part of the Middle Atlantic States. It is bordered by Pennsylvania to the north, Maryland to the east and northeast, Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, and Ohio to the northwest. West Virginia is the 41st largest state by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston.

Mining accident

In 2002, a slurry pond break in the head of a hollow past Lyburn Post Office Road flooded more than ten residences. The pond, called "Pond 8A" is part of the Tower Mountain Surface Mine, which is operated by Bandmill Coal Corporation, a subsidiary of Massey Energy. The mine was originally permitted by Elkay Mining Company, a Pittston subsidiary, but was recently taken over by Bandmill. There are more than ten ponds on the mine site.

Massey Energy

Massey Energy Company was a coal extractor in the United States with substantial operations in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia. By revenue, it was the fourth largest producer of coal in the United States and the largest coal producer in Central Appalachia. By coal production weight, it was the sixth largest producer of coal in the United States.

Related Research Articles

Tailings, also called mine dumps, culm dumps, slimes, tails, refuse, leach residue, slickens, or terra-cone (terrikon), are the materials left over after the process of separating the valuable fraction from the uneconomic fraction (gangue) of an ore. Tailings are distinct from overburden, which is the waste rock or other material that overlies an ore or mineral body and is displaced during mining without being processed.

Gold mining process of extracting gold from the ground

Gold mining is the resource extraction of gold by mining.

Mountaintop removal mining form of surface mining that involves the mining of the summit or summit ridge of a mountain

Mountaintop removal mining (MTR), also known as mountaintop mining (MTM), is a form of surface mining at the summit or summit ridge of a mountain. Coal seams are extracted from a mountain by removing the land, or overburden, above the seams. This method of coal mining is conducted in the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. Explosives are used to remove up to 400 vertical feet of mountain to expose underlying coal seams. Excess rock and soil is dumped into nearby valleys, in what are called "holler fills" or "valley fills". Less expensive to execute and requiring fewer employees, mountaintop removal mining began in Appalachia in the 1970s as an extension of conventional strip mining techniques. It is primarily occurring in Kentucky, West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee.

Surface mining broad category of mining

Surface mining, including strip mining, open-pit mining and mountaintop removal mining, is a broad category of mining in which soil and rock overlying the mineral deposit are removed, in contrast to underground mining, in which the overlying rock is left in place, and the mineral is removed through shafts or tunnels.

A coal town, also known as a coal camp or patch is typically situated in a remote place and provides residences for a population of miners to reside near a coal mine. A coal town is a type of company town or mining community established by the employer, a mining company, which imports workers to work the mineral find. The 'town founding' process is not limited to coal mining, nor mining, but is generally found where mineral wealth is located in a remote or undeveloped area, which is then opened for exploitation, normally first by having some transportation infrastructure brought into being first. Often, such minerals were the result of logging operations by pushing into a wilderness forest, which clear-cutting operations then allowed geologists and cartographers, to chart and plot the lands, allowing efficient discovery of natural resources and their exploitation.

Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977

The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) is the primary federal law that regulates the environmental effects of coal mining in the United States.

Uneeda, West Virginia Unincorporated community in West Virginia, United States

Uneeda is an unincorporated community on the Pond Fork River in Boone County in the U.S. state of West Virginia. The town lies along West Virginia Route 85.

The Logan Coalfield is a coalfield located in Logan County and Wyoming County of southern West Virginia, in the Appalachia region of the eastern United States.

Patriot Coal

Patriot Coal Corporation was a coal-mining company based in St. Louis, Missouri in the United States. The company is a spin-off of most of the Eastern U.S. operations of Peabody Energy.

Stone, Kentucky Unincorporated community in Kentucky, United States

Stone is an unincorporated community and coal town in Pike County, Kentucky, United States. It was established in 1912. Stone was a mining community named for Galen Stone, head of the Pond Creek Coal Company which was based in Stone. In 1922 the Pond Creek Coal Company was sold to Fordson Coal Company, which was a subsidiary of Ford Motor Company. In 1936 Fordson sold the mine at Stone to Eastern Coal Company.

Arch Coal

Arch Coal is an American coal mining and processing company. The company mines, processes, and markets bituminous and sub-bituminous coal with low sulfur content in the United States. Arch Coal is the second largest supplier of coal in the United States behind Peabody Energy. The company supplies 15% of the domestic market. Demand comes mainly from generators of electricity.

HDG International Group and its subsidiaries are leading coal, natural gas and oil producers with significant operations in the central Appalachian area of the United States. Their reserves consist of over 4 billion tons primarily consisting of high Btu, low sulfur steam coal that is currently in high demand in the United States and international coal markets.

Coal slurry is a mixture of solids and liquids produced by a coal preparation plant. As a slurry, coal is separated from non-combustable components (ash) and can be fractionated by particle size as well. Coal slurry can be transferred by pipeline or with specialised pumps such as a progressive cavity pump to pump the highly abrasive, corrosive and viscous coal slurry.

Red River (Koner) river in north-west Cornwall, United Kingdom

The Red River is a small river in north-west Cornwall, United Kingdom which issues into St Ives Bay at Godrevy on Cornwall's Atlantic coast. The Red River is about 8 miles (13 km) long and was given its name from the mineral deposits associated with tin mining which formerly coloured its water red. The river's gradient is relatively steep; the stream falls 170 metres (560 ft) from source to sea.

History of coal mining in the United States

The history of coal mining in the United States goes back to the 1300s, when the Hopi Indians used coal. The first use by European people in the United States was in the 1740s, in Virginia. Coal was the dominant power source in the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and remains a significant source of energy.

Mining in the United States has been active since colonial times, but became a major industry in the 19th century with a number of new mineral discoveries causing a series of mining "rushes." In 2015, the value of coal, metals, and industrial minerals mined in the United States was US $109.6 billion. 158,000 workers were directly employed by the mining industry.

Crichton, West Virginia Unincorporated community in West Virginia, United States

Crichton is an unincorporated community and coal town in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, United States. Crichton is located near the western border of Quinwood.

Upper Harz Water Regale

The Upper Harz Water Regale is a system of dams, reservoirs, ditches and other structures, much of which was built from the 16th to 19th centuries to divert and store the water that drove the water wheels of the mines in the Upper Harz region of Germany. The term regale, here, refers to the granting of royal privileges or rights in this case to permit the use of water for mining operations in the Harz mountains of Germany.

North Mara Gold Mine

North Mara Gold Mine is a combined open pit and underground gold mine in the Tarime District of the Mara Region of Tanzania. It is one of three gold mines Acacia Mining plc, a company listed on the London Stock Exchange, operates in Tanzania, the other two being Bulyanhulu and the Buzwagi Gold Mine.

Hobet Coal Mine

The Hobet 21 Coal Mine in West Virginia was operational between 1974 and 2015. Straddling the border of Boone County and Lincoln County in the Appalachian Mountains, the Hobet 21 mine was one of the largest mountaintop-removal coal mining operations in West Virginia. Originally owned by Fil Nutter, the mine used both underground mining and strip mining techniques, and later even more intensive surface mining using a dragline. Increasing productivity and profitability encouraged workers to successfully strike for their health plan in 1993, which resulted in unusually thorough coverage for mine workers at this time. The Hobet mine was incorporated into Arch Coal in 1997, along with several other mines, following booming coal demand. The mine was sold two more times: to Magnum Coal in 2005 and to Patriot Coal in 2008. Patriot Coal subsequently went bankrupt in 2015, and the Hobet site was passed into a Virginia-based conservation firm who continued to mine the land while reclaiming and planting trees to offset carbon emissions for other companies.

References