Rio Declaration on Environment and Development

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The Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, often shortened to Rio Declaration, was a short document produced at the 1992 United Nations "Conference on Environment and Development" (UNCED), informally known as the Earth Summit. The Rio Declaration consisted of 27 principles intended to guide countries in future sustainable development. It was signed by over 170 countries.

Contents

History

The international community met twice to assess the progress made in implementing the principles of the document; first in New York City in 1997 during a General Assembly Session of the UN, and then in Johannesburg in 2002. While the document helped to raise environmental awareness, evidence shows that little has been achieved in the document's environmental goals. [1]

Content

The Rio Declaration proclaims 27 principles. It includes formulations of the precautionary principle (principle 15) and of the polluter pays principle (principle 16).

See also

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References

  1. Palmer, Robert; Nursey-Bray, Melissa (2007). "Rio Declaration on Environment and Development". In Robbins, Paul (ed.). Encyclopedia of Environment and Society. 4. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. pp. 1512–1514. ISBN   9781412927611.