Sustainable landscape architecture

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Sustainable landscape architecture is a category of sustainable design concerned with the planning and design of outdoor space. [1]

Contents

This can include ecological, politically correct, social and economic aspects of sustainability. For example, the design of a sustainable urban drainage system can: improve habitats for fauna and flora; improve recreational facilities, because people love to be beside water; save money, because building culverts is expensive and floods cause severe financial harm.

The design of a green roof or a roof garden can also contribute to the sustainability of a landscape architecture project. The roof will help manage surface water, provide for wildlife and provide for recreation.

Creating a sustainable landscape is to take into consideration the history, cultural associations, archaeology, geology, topography, soils, ecology, land use, and architecture. Designers regularly do in depth research in order to figure out what the best way to design a landscape is in order to make it the most sustainable. Methods used to create sustainable landscapes include recycling, restoration, species reintroduction, and many more.

History

The first documented concern of the destruction of the modern landscape was in the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act. [2]

See also

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References

  1. Orr, Stephen. "A Sustainability That Aims to Seduce". The New York Times. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  2. Tress, Bärbel; Tress, Barbel; Tres, Gunther; Fry, Gary; Opdam, Paul (2006). From Landscape Research to Landscape Planning: Aspects of Integration, Education and Application. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN   978-1-4020-3979-9.