Outline of sustainability

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EnvironmentEquitableSustainableBearable (Social ecology)Viable (Environmental economics)EconomicSocialOutline of sustainability
Outline of sustainability
Venn diagram of sustainable development:
at the confluence of three constituent parts [1]

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to sustainability:

Contents

Sustainability capacity to endure. For humans, sustainability is the long-term maintenance of well being, which has environmental, economic, and social dimensions, and encompasses the concept of stewardship and responsible resource management.

Essence of sustainability

Sustainability

Taxonomy

Sustainabiity is divided into two main branches: sustainability science and sustainability governance. Each of these branches is divided into a number of subfields:

Sub-fields of sustainability science

Sustainability science

Sub-fields of sustainability governance

Sustainable packaging - molded pulp uses recycled newsprint to form package components. Here, researchers are molding packaging from straw Molding packaging from straw, k9837-1.jpg
Sustainable packaging - molded pulp uses recycled newsprint to form package components. Here, researchers are molding packaging from straw

Sustainability governance

History of sustainability

History of sustainability

Biodiversity

Coral reefs are amongst the most diverse ecosystems on earth. Blue Linckia Starfish.JPG
Coral reefs are amongst the most diverse ecosystems on earth.

Biodiversity

Levels of biological organisation

Politics of sustainability

Population control

Population control

Environmental technology

Sustainable urban design and innovation: Photovoltaic ombriere SUDI is an autonomous and mobile station that replenishes energy for electric vehicles using solar energy. Ombriere SUDI - Sustainable Urban Design & Innovation.jpg
Sustainable urban design and innovation: Photovoltaic ombrière SUDI is an autonomous and mobile station that replenishes energy for electric vehicles using solar energy.

Environmental technology

Energy conservation

Energy conservation

Over consumption

Over-consumption

Food

Urban horticulture - Salad lettuce cultivation at the Growing Communities' urban plot, in Springfield Park, Clapton, North London. Urban salad growing-London.jpg
Urban horticulture - Salad lettuce cultivation at the Growing Communities‘ urban plot, in Springfield Park, Clapton, North London.

Food

Water

Water

Materials

Recycling and rubbish bin in a German railway station DeutscheBahnRecycling20050814 CopyrightKaihsuTai Rotated.jpg
Recycling and rubbish bin in a German railway station

Materials

Sustainability organizations

Sustainability publications

Leaders in sustainability

Category:Sustainability advocates

Paul Hawken

See also

Sustainability lists
Sustainability glossaries

Related Research Articles

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to sustainable agriculture:

The green economy is defined as economy that aims at making issues of reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities, and that aims for sustainable development without degrading the environment. It is closely related with ecological economics, but has a more politically applied focus. The 2011 UNEP Green Economy Report argues "that to be green, an economy must not only be efficient, but also fair. Fairness implies recognizing global and country level equity dimensions, particularly in assuring a just transition to an economy that is low-carbon, resource efficient, and socially inclusive."

Human impact on the environment Factors influencing human life on earth

Human impact on the environment or anthropogenic impact on the environment includes changes to biophysical environments and ecosystems, biodiversity, and natural resources caused directly or indirectly by humans, including global warming, environmental degradation, mass extinction and biodiversity loss, ecological crisis, and ecological collapse. Modifying the environment to fit the needs of society is causing severe effects, which become worse as the problem of human overpopulation continues. Some human activities that cause damage to the environment on a global scale include human reproduction, overconsumption, overexploitation, pollution, and deforestation, to name but a few. Some of the problems, including global warming and biodiversity loss pose an existential risk to the human race, and human overpopulation causes those problems.

The Earth Institute was established at Columbia University in 1995. The research institute's stated mission is to address complex issues facing the planet and its inhabitants, with a focus on sustainable development. With an interdisciplinary approach this includes research in climate change, geology, global health, economics, management, agriculture, ecosystems, urbanization, energy, hazards, and water. The Earth Institute's activities are guided by the idea that science and technological tools that already exist could be applied to greatly improve conditions for the world's poor, while preserving the natural systems that support life on Earth.

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH or GIZ in short is a German development agency headquartered in Bonn and Eschborn that provides services in the field of international development cooperation. GIZ mainly implements technical cooperation projects of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), its main commissioning party, although it also works with the private sector and other national and supranational government organizations on a public benefit basis. In its activities GIZ seeks to follow the paradigm of sustainable development, which aims at economic development through social inclusion and environmental protection. GIZ offers consulting and capacity building services in a wide range of areas, including management consulting, rural development, sustainable infrastructure, security and peace-building, social development, governance and democracy, environment and climate change, and economic development and employment.

Lists of environmental topics Wikimedia list article

The natural environment commonly referred to simply as the environment, is all living and non-living things that occur naturally on Earth or some part of it. This includes complete ecological units that function as natural systems without massive human intervention, including all vegetation, animals, microorganisms, rocks, atmosphere and natural phenomena that occur within their boundaries. And it includes universal natural resources and physical phenomena that lack clear-cut boundaries, such as air, water, and climate, as well as energy, radiation, electric charge, and magnetism, not originating from human activity.

This is a list of climate change topics.

This page is an index of sustainability articles.

Sustainability process of maintaining change in a balanced fashion

Sustainability is the ability to exist constantly. In the 21st century, it refers generally to the capacity for the biosphere and human civilization to coexist. It is also defined as the process of people maintaining change in a homeostasis balanced environment, in which the exploitation of resources, the direction of investments, the orientation of technological development and institutional change are all in harmony and enhance both current and future potential to meet human needs and aspirations. For many in the field, sustainability is defined through the following interconnected domains or pillars: environment, economic and social, which according to Fritjof Capra is based on the principles of Systems Thinking. Sub-domains of sustainable development have been considered also: cultural, technological and political. According to Our Common Future, Sustainable development is defined as development that "meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." Sustainable development may be the organizing principle of sustainability, yet others may view the two terms as paradoxical.

Index of environmental articles overview about the index of environmental articles

The natural environment, commonly referred to simply as the environment, includes all living and non-living things occurring naturally on Earth.

The history of sustainability traces human-dominated ecological systems from the earliest civilizations to the present. This history is characterized by the increased regional success of a particular society, followed by crises that were either resolved, producing sustainability, or not, leading to decline.

The Societal Benefit Areas(SBAs) are eight environmental fields of interest, all of which relate to climate, around which the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) project is exerting its efforts. These include: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Sustainability, Disaster Resilience, Energy and Mineral Resources Management, Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture, Infrastructure and Transport Management, Public Health Surveillance, Sustainable Urban Development, and Water Resources Management around which a preliminary hierarchical vocabulary has been created.

Green urbanism has been defined as the practice of creating communities beneficial to human and the environment. According to Timothy Beatley, it is an attempt to shape more sustainable places, communities and lifestyles, and consume less of the world’s resources. Green urbanism is interdisciplinary, combining the collaboration of landscape architects, engineers, urban planners, ecologists, transport planners, physicists, psychologists, sociologists, economists and other specialists in addition to architects and urban designers.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to environmentalism, broad philosophy, ideology and social movement regarding concerns for environmental conservation and improvement of the health of the environment, particularly as the measure for this health seeks to incorporate the concerns of non-human elements. Environmentalism advocates the preservation, restoration and/or improvement of the natural environment, and may be referred to as a movement to control pollution.

References

  1. Adams, W.M. (2006). "The Future of Sustainability: Re-thinking Environment and Development in the Twenty-first Century." Archived 2011-07-18 at the Wayback Machine Report of the IUCN Renowned Thinkers Meeting, 29–31 January 2006. Retrieved on: 2009-02-16.
  2. Wood, Marcia (April 2002). "Leftover Straw Gets New Life". Agricultural Research.