Sonic Mega Collection

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Sonic Mega Collection
Sonic Mega Collection Coverart.png
Developer(s) Sonic Team
Publisher(s)
Director(s) Yojiro Ogawa
Producer(s) Yuji Naka
Designer(s) Hideaki Moriya
Artist(s) Yuji Uekawa
Composer(s) Hideaki Kobayashi
Series Sonic the Hedgehog
Platform(s) GameCube, PlayStation 2, Xbox, Microsoft Windows
Release
Genre(s) Compilation
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

Sonic Mega Collection [lower-alpha 1] is a video game compilation developed by Sonic Team and published by Sega in 2002 for the GameCube. The compilation contains twelve to fourteen games (depending on region) originally released on the Sega Genesis. Ten of the included games are installments of the Sonic the Hedgehog series, while the remaining two to four games are only related to the series through its publisher, Sega.

Video game electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor

A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a two- or three-dimensional video display device such as a TV screen, virtual reality headset or computer monitor. Since the 1980s, video games have become an increasingly important part of the entertainment industry, and whether they are also a form of art is a matter of dispute.

In marketing, product bundling is offering several products or services for sale as one combined product or service package. It is a common feature in many imperfectly competitive product and service markets. Industries engaged in the practice include telecommunications services, financial services, health care, information and consumer electronics. A software bundle might include a word processor, spreadsheet, and presentation program into a single office suite. The cable television industry often bundles many TV and movie channels into a single tier or package. The fast food industry combines separate food items into a "meal deal" or "value meal".

Sega CS Research and Development No. 2, commonly abbreviated as Sega CS2 R&D and better known as Sonic Team, is a video game development division of the Japanese company Sega. Sonic Team is best known for the long-running Sonic the Hedgehog series and games such as Nights into Dreams and Phantasy Star Online.

Contents

According to the director, Yojiro Ogawa, the purpose of the compilation was to introduce younger players to the original games in the Sonic series. The games are played through a Genesis emulator developed by Sonic Team themselves. Outside of the games, the compilation includes Sonic-themed videos and illustrations, as well as high-resolution scans of the instruction manuals and Sonic the Hedgehog comic covers.

Sonic Mega Collection received positive critical reception, being recommended for its large library of titles, great emulation, and its cheap market price. The compilation was re-released with eight bonus games as Sonic Mega Collection Plus for PlayStation 2, Xbox, and Microsoft Windows. This was followed by a new compilation for the GameCube, Sonic Gems Collection , which included more obscure and rare Sonic games such as Sonic CD .

PlayStation 2 No history

The PlayStation 2 is a home video game console developed and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was first released in Japan on March 4, 2000, in North America on October 26, 2000, and in Europe and Australia in November 2000, and is the successor to the PlayStation, as well as the second video game console in the PlayStation brand. As a sixth-generation console, the PS2 competed with Sega's Dreamcast, Nintendo's GameCube, and Microsoft's Xbox.

Xbox is a video gaming brand created and owned by Microsoft. It represents a series of video game consoles developed by Microsoft, with three consoles released in the sixth, seventh, and eighth generations, respectively. The brand also represents applications (games), streaming services, an online service by the name of Xbox Live, and the development arm by the name of Xbox Game Studios. The brand was first introduced in the United States in November 2001, with the launch of the original Xbox console.

Microsoft Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Microsoft Windows families include Windows NT and Windows IoT; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Server or Windows Embedded Compact. Defunct Microsoft Windows families include Windows 9x, Windows Mobile and Windows Phone.

Overview

Sonic Mega Collection features twelve to fourteen complete games in one retail unit. All games are ports of their original versions on the Sega Genesis. High-resolution instruction manual scans are included for each game. Also included is an Extras section featuring over 100 scans of Sonic the Hedgehog comic covers, illustrations of Sonic characters throughout the franchise's history, and a handful of videos promoting other Sonic games, including the beginning and end sequences to Sonic CD . In addition to the seven default games, three unlockable games are included that recreated the Sonic & Knuckles "lock-on technology" to allow for new modes and/or playable characters in each of the first three games in the Sonic the Hedgehog series. Also, four games published by Sega but not in the Sonic series could also be unlocked (two in the North American version).

Sega Genesis Fourth-generation home video game console and fourth developed by Sega

The Sega Genesis, known as the Mega Drive in regions outside North America, is a 16-bit home video game console developed and sold by Sega. The Genesis is Sega's third console and the successor to the Master System. Sega released it as the Mega Drive in Japan in 1988, followed by North America as the Genesis in 1989. In 1990, it was distributed as the Mega Drive by Virgin Mastertronic in Europe, Ozisoft in Australasia, and Tectoy in Brazil. In South Korea, it was distributed by Samsung as the Super Gam*Boy and later the Super Aladdin Boy.

<i>Sonic CD</i> 1993 video game

Sonic the Hedgehog CD, commonly referred to as Sonic CD, is a 1993 platform game for the Sega CD. The story follows Sonic the Hedgehog as he attempts to save an extraterrestrial body, Little Planet, from Doctor Robotnik. As a Sonic the Hedgehog series platformer, Sonic runs and jumps through several themed levels while collecting rings and defeating robots. Sonic CD is distinguished from other Sonic games by its time travel feature, a key aspect to the story and gameplay. By traveling through time, players can access different versions of stages featuring alternate layouts, music, and graphics based on the time period.

<i>Sonic & Knuckles</i> platform video game originally released for the Sega Genesis

Sonic & Knuckles is a 1994 platform game developed and published by Sega for the Sega Genesis. An installment in the main Sonic the Hedgehog series, it is the sequel to Sonic the Hedgehog 3, released earlier that year. The story follows Sonic the Hedgehog and Knuckles the Echidna in their quests to save Angel Island; Sonic tries to prevent Dr. Robotnik from relaunching his orbital weapon, the Death Egg, while Knuckles scuffles with Robotnik's minion, EggRobo.

Games included in Sonic Mega Collection
Default Sonic games
TitleGenreOriginal releaseDeveloper
Sonic the Hedgehog Platform 1991 Sonic Team
Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Platform 1992 Sega Technical Institute
Sonic Spinball Pinball 1993 Sega Technical Institute
Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine Puzzle 1993 Compile
Sonic the Hedgehog 3 Platform 1994 Sega
Sonic & Knuckles Platform 1994 Sega
Sonic 3D Blast Platform 1996 Traveller's Tales, Sonic Team
Unlockable Sonic games
TitleGenreOriginal releaseDeveloper
Blue Sphere Platform 1991 Sonic Team
Knuckles in Sonic 2 Platform 1992 Sega Technical Institute
Sonic 3 & Knuckles Platform 1994 Sega
Additional unlockable games
TitleGenreOriginal releaseDeveloper
Flicky Platform 1991 [lower-roman 1] Sega
Ristar Platform 1995 Sega
Comix Zone [lower-roman 2] Beat 'em up 1995 Sega Technical Institute
The Ooze [lower-roman 2] Action 1995 Sega Technical Institute
  1. Flicky was originally released for arcades in 1984. The 1991 Genesis port is used in Sonic Mega Collection.
  2. 1 2 Only available in the Japanese release. Also included in Sonic Mega Collection Plus.

Development

Mega Collection was developed by Sonic Team, [1] the studio behind most games in the Sonic series. According to director Yojiro Ogawa, Sonic Team's goal with the compilation was to introduce children to older games in the series and showcase what made Sonic successful. [2] Sonic Team chose to focus on including all the Genesis Sonic games. [3] Rather than porting them from the Genesis, they collaborated with VR-1 Japan to develop an emulator to run the games' ROM images. [1] Series co-creator Yuji Naka, who served as producer, said the team intended to include the 1993 Sega CD game Sonic CD , but storage constraints prevented this. [3] Sonic Team also considered including BlueSky Software's Vectorman (1995), [2] and Sonic R (1997) and Sonic Shuffle (2000) were expected to appear in Mega Collection at one point. [4] CD, Vectorman, and R later appeared in Sonic Gems Collection (2005), a successor to Mega Collection focusing on rare Sonic games. [2] Sonic Team had trouble gathering materials for the compilation because it had been a decade since they made the games and "Sega's not that good about keeping history." [3] For instance, Naka wanted to include the original prototype of the first game but Sonic Team could not find its ROM image. [5]

In software engineering, porting is the process of adapting software for the purpose of achieving some form of execution in a computing environment that is different from the one that a given program was originally designed for. The term is also used when software/hardware is changed to make them usable in different environments.

ROM image

A ROM image, or ROM file, is a computer file which contains a copy of the data from a read-only memory chip, often from a video game cartridge, a computer's firmware, or from an arcade game's main board. The term is frequently used in the context of emulation, whereby older games or computer firmware are copied to ROM files on modern computers and can, using a piece of software known as an emulator, be run on a computer.

Yuji Naka Japanese video game designer and programmer

Yuji Naka is a Japanese video game programmer, designer, and producer best known as the former head of Sonic Team, where he was the lead programmer of the original Sonic the Hedgehog series of games on the Sega Genesis. In 2006, he founded Prope, an independent game company. In January 2018, he joined Square Enix.

Sega announced Mega Collection as a GameCube exclusive in early July 2002, [6] and revealed which games would be included later that month. [7] The compilation went gold the following November; [8] Naka said Sonic Team felt a sense of accomplishment when they completed it. [3] Mega Collection was released in North America on November 10, 2002, in Japan on December 19, 2002, [1] and in Europe on March 21, 2003. [9] Infogrames published the compilation in Europe. [10] When Sega began to expand support for the PlayStation 2, it commissioned a version of Mega Collection for that console and the Xbox. [11] This version, Sonic Mega Collection Plus, was announced at E3 2004. [12] Plus was released in North America on November 2, 2004, [13] in Japan on December 9, 2004, [14] and in Europe on February 4, 2005. [15] A Windows version was released in March 2006, [16] and was later included in the Sonic PC Collection (2009). [17]

Sonic Mega Collection Plus

Sonic Mega Collection Plus is an update of Sonic Mega Collection for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox consoles. A Microsoft Windows version was also released in Europe and North America. This edition includes all of the games in Sonic Mega Collection, including the two Genesis games that were included in the Japanese version of Sonic Mega Collection, plus the addition of six Game Gear games:

Games included in Sonic Mega Collection
TitleGenreOriginal releaseDeveloper
Sonic the Hedgehog Platform 1991 Ancient
Sonic Chaos Platform 1993 Aspect
Sonic Drift Kart racing 1994 Sega, Arc System Works
Sonic Labyrinth Action, Puzzle 1995 Minato Giken
Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine Puzzle 1995 Compile
Sonic Blast Platform 1996 Aspect

Reception

Reviews for Sonic Mega Collection were generally favorable. Louis Bedigian of GameZone praised the controls as "top-notch" including that "even the thumbstick is usable, and it works flawlessly." [18] Game Informer declared Sonic Mega Collection to be "perhaps the best compilation ever." [19] Fran Mirabella of IGN christened the compilation as "a wonderful little collection that, while not perfect, is a great value." [20] Jeff Gerstmann of GameSpot suggested that "if you're fiending for Sonic the Hedgehog and either don't have or are unwilling to drag out a dusty Genesis from the closet, don't hesitate to give it a shot." [21] However, Johnny Liu of Game Revolution advised "just blow the dust off the old Genesis, because there isn't enough good extra stuff here." [22] Nintendo Power described Sonic Mega Collection as "the ultimate compilation of Sonic adventures." [19]

Reviews for Sonic Mega Collection Plus were also positive. Chris Baker of GameSpy decided that "despite its exclusions, though, Collection's large selection of titles for $19.99 is a tough thing not to recommend to anyone who calls himself a gamer. Even if a few of the games undeniably suck." [23] [24] Hilary Goldstein of IGN declared that "you can't find a better deal than 20 games for 20 dollars," and that "while not every Sonic game is a winner, the majority are. These games, though old, are superior to Sega's more recent 3D Sonic offerings." [25] [26] Aceinet of GameZone, while praising the compilation overall as "a nearly complete package of classic Sonic games," was critical of the emulation of the Game Gear games, saying that "while the emulation is spot-on for the games, having to put up with a black bar around the screen could be upsetting to some." [27] Jeremy Parish of 1UP.com assured readers that "even with its shortcomings, it's still one of the most value-packed classic compilations available for any system -- as long as you like Sonic." [28] Game Informer suggested that "if you grew up with these games, they're still a joy to play," and that "new converts to the Sonic fold will get a great introduction to the 'hog's history." [29] [30] GMR Magazine concluded that "if you're new to Sonic, for 20 bucks you really can't go wrong." [29]

The PlayStation 2 version of Mega Collection Plus received a "Platinum" sales award from the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA), [31] indicating sales of at least 300,000 copies in the United Kingdom. [32]

See also

Notes

  1. Japanese:ソニック メガコレクション Hepburn:Sonikku Mega Korekushon ?

Related Research Articles

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<i>Sonic the Hedgehog</i> (1991 video game) 1991 video game

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<i>Sonic the Hedgehog</i> (8-bit video game) 8-bit 1991 platform video game

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<i>Ristar</i> 1995 video game

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<i>Sonic Spinball</i> 1993 video game

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References

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  21. Gerstmann, Jeff (2002-11-18). "Sonic Mega Collection for GameCube Review". GameSpot . Retrieved December 4, 2008. If you're fiending for Sonic the Hedgehog and either don't have or are unwilling to drag out a dusty Genesis from the closet, don't hesitate to give it a shot.
  22. Liu, Johnny. "Game Revolution GameCube Review Page". Game Revolution . Retrieved December 4, 2008. If you already have some of these games, I'd advise just blowing the dust off the old Genesis, because there isn't enough good extra stuff here.
  23. Baker, Chris (2004-11-01). "GameSpy: Sonic Mega Collection Plus Review". GameSpy . Retrieved December 4, 2008. Despite its exclusions, though, Collection's large selection of titles for $19.99 is a tough thing not to recommend to anyone who calls himself a gamer. Even if a few of the games undeniably suck.
  24. Baker, Chris (2004-11-01). "GameSpy: Sonic Mega Collection Plus Review". GameSpy . Retrieved December 4, 2008. Despite its exclusions, though, Collection's large selection of titles for $19.99 is a tough thing not to recommend to anyone who calls himself a gamer. Even if a few of the games undeniably suck.
  25. Goldstein, Hilary (2004-11-03). "IGN: Sonic Mega Collection Plus Review". IGN . Retrieved December 4, 2008. You can't find a better deal than 20 games for 20 dollars. While not every Sonic game is a winner, the majority are. These games, though old, are superior to Sega's more recent 3D Sonic offerings.
  26. Goldstein, Hilary (2004-11-03). "IGN: Sonic Mega Collection Plus Review". IGN . Retrieved December 4, 2008. You can't find a better deal than 20 games for 20 dollars. While not every Sonic game is a winner, the majority are. These games, though old, are superior to Sega's more recent 3D Sonic offerings.
  27. Aceinet (2004-11-22). "Sonic Mega Collection Plus Review - PlayStation 2". GameZone. Archived from the original on June 11, 2009. Retrieved December 4, 2008. However this collection also gives you an insight into some of the Sonic games that some players wished would disappear. While the emulation is spot-on for the games, having to put up with a black bar around the screen could be upsetting to some.
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