Spite (sentiment)

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To spite is to intentionally annoy, hurt, or upset even when there might be no (apparent) gain, and even when those actions might cause the person spiting harm, as well. [1] Spiteful words or actions are delivered in such a way that it is clear that the person is delivering them just to annoy, hurt, or upset. [2] When the intent to annoy, hurt, or upset is shown subtly, behavior is considered catty. [3]

Contents

In his 1929 examination of emotional disturbances, Psychology and Morals: An Analysis of Character, J. A. Hadfield uses deliberately spiteful acts to illustrate the difference between disposition and sentiment. [4]

In fiction

The Underground Man, in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novella Notes from Underground , is an example of spite. His motivation remains constantly spiteful, undercutting his own existence and ability to live.

See also

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Spite may refer to:

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Envy' is an emotion which "occurs when a person lacks another's superior quality, achievement, or possession and either desires it or wishes that the other lacked it".

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References

  1. "10 Scientific Facts About Spite".
  2. "spite - definition of spite in English from the Oxford dictionary".
  3. http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861595550%5B%5D
  4. Hadfield, J. A. "Psychology and Morals: An Analysis of Character". Google Books preview. Retrieved 2016-05-02.