Splash screen

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A splash screen in GIMP GIMP 2.10 splash screen.png
A splash screen in GIMP

A splash screen is a graphical control element consisting of a window containing an image, a logo, and the current version of the software. A splash screen usually appears while a game or program is launching. A splash page is an introduction page on a website. [1] [2] A splash screen may cover the entire screen or web page; or may simply be a rectangle near the center of the screen or page. The splash screens of operating systems and some applications that expect to be run in full screen usually cover the entire screen.

Contents

Purpose

Splash screens are typically used by particularly large applications to notify the user that the program is in the process of loading. They provide feedback that a lengthy process is underway. Occasionally, a progress bar within the splash screen indicates the loading progress. A splash screen disappears when the application's main window appears. Splash screens may be added for a period of time and then replaced anew.

Splash screens typically serve to enhance the look and feel of an application or web site, hence they are often visually appealing. They may also have animations, graphics, and sound.

The Java programming language has a specific class for creating splash screens, called java.awt.SplashScreen [3] that handles standard splash screen functions, e.g. display an image centered on screen that disappears when the first program window opens.

On the Web, a splash screen is a page of a web site that acts as a front page prior to displaying the home page. Designers may use splash pages:

An early use of the splash screen on a Flash website was to enable the site developer to launch the site in a JavaScript-controlled new window without browser elements such as scroll-bars or an address bar, and in the exact size of the Flash movie. This has gone out of style with the predominance of pop-up blockers. Instead many starting Flash web pages now allow their audience to choose to go to full screen viewing.[ citation needed ]

Since splash screens often increase the wait for the desired content and may take a long time to load, they are not liked by all users. Web splash screens are especially inconvenient for users with slow internet connections as the first page may take longer to load. Moreover, if the user has turned off rich content, such as images, Flash, or Shockwave, the splash page may not load at all. Splash pages and any associated main pages created in Flash often cannot be accessed by search engines or handled by text readers for the blind. [4]

Splash screens can also be created in HTML and CSS if they are designed for a purpose other than as a loading screen. Instead, they are used for other purposes such as giving the option to pick the language.

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Kyrnin, Jennifer (15 October 2019). "Pros and Cons of Splash Pages in Web Design". About.com.
  2. Lennartz, Sven (October 11, 2007). "Splash Pages: Do We Really Need Them?". Smashing Magazine.
  3. "SplashScreen (Java Platform SE 6)" . Retrieved September 8, 2015.
  4. "Flash Accessibility Issues". WebAIM.org. Retrieved September 8, 2015.