Stop the Bus

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For the song "Stop the Bus" by Terrorvision, see How to Make Friends and Influence People

Stop the Bus is a simple game, common in England where it is also known as Bastard. [1]

The game uses the hand rankings from Brag. Three of a kind, (a prial), is the best hand followed by a running flush, then a run, then a flush, then a pair followed by a high card. If a hand is otherwise similar then the card is ranked by high card or high pair, then by middle card or kicker, then low card. No suits are higher valued than any other.

The game is played with a standard 52 card deck. Each player starts with some number of tokens, generally 3, and the last person to lose their token wins. Each round everybody is dealt 3 cards face down, with 3 dealt into the middle face up. Starting with the player on the dealer's left and working clockwise each player must take either 1 or 3 of the centre cards and replace it with an equal number from their own hand. After playing, a player may elect to "Stop the Bus", in which case everybody else gets one turn only. After somebody has "Stopped the Bus" and everybody else has had a turn, the hands are revealed. The player or players with the weakest hand must relinquish one token, and play continues with the new dealer being the player immediately clockwise of the old dealer. Once a player has lost all of their tokens they are out. The winner is the last player to retain a token.

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Five-card draw is a poker variant that is considered the simplest variant of poker, and is the basis for video poker. As a result, it is often the first variant learned by new players. It is commonly played in home games but rarely played in casino and tournament play. The variant is also offered by some online venues, although it is not as popular as other variants such as seven-card stud and Texas hold 'em.

Poker Family of card games

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Cribbage Card game

Cribbage, or crib, is a card game traditionally for two players, but commonly played with three, four or more, that involves playing and grouping cards in combinations which gain points.

Brag (card game)

Brag is an 18th century British card game, and the British national representative of the vying or "bluffing" family of gambling games. It is a descendant of the Elizabethan game of Primero and one of the several ancestors to poker, the modern version just varying in betting style and hand rankings. It has been described as the "longest-standing British representative of the Poker family."

Thirty-one or Trente et un is a gambling card game played by two to seven people, where players attempt to assemble a hand which totals 31. Such a goal has formed the whole or part of various games like Commerce, Cribbage, Trentuno, and Wit and Reason since the 15th century.

Razz is a form of stud poker that is normally played for ace-to-five low. It is one of the oldest forms of poker, and has been played since the start of the 20th Century. It emerged around the time people started using the 52-card deck instead of 20 for poker.

Rummy

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<i>Daifugō</i>

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Ranter-Go-Round

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Guts is a comparing card game, or family of card games, related to poker. Guts is a gambling game involving a series of deals of 2, 3, or 4 cards. Hand are ranked similarly to hands in poker. The betting during each deal is simple : all players decide whether they are "in" or "out", and announce this at the same time. Each deal has its own showdown, after which the losers match or increase the pot, which grows rapidly. A round of the game ends when only one person stays in and wins the pot.

The rules here are based on those of the American Cribbage Congress and apply to two-, three- or four-player games, with details of variations being listed below.

The following is a glossary of poker terms used in the card game of poker. It supplements the glossary of card game terms. Besides the terms listed here, there are thousands of common and uncommon poker slang terms. This is not intended to be a formal dictionary; precise usage details and multiple closely related senses are omitted here in favor of concise treatment of the basics.

Court Piece is an Iranian trick-taking card game similar to the card game whist in which eldest hand makes trumps after the first five cards have been dealt, and trick-play is typically stopped after one party has won seven tricks. A bonus is awarded if one party wins the first seven tricks, or even all tricks. The game is played by four players in two teams, but there are also adaptations for two or three players.

Open-face Chinese poker

Open-face Chinese poker, OFCP, commonly known as Open Face Chinese or OFC, is a variant of Chinese poker where players receive five cards to start and then one card at a time until each player has a 13 card hand legal or not. The game originated in Finland during the mid-2000s and spread to Russia a few years later. Professional poker player Alex Kravchenko, who is credited with introducing the game to the Russian high-stakes community, describes the game as "spreading like a virus". The game was introduced to the United States in 2012.

References

  1. Parlett, David (1979). The Penguin Encyclopedia of Card Games. Penguin. p. 394. ISBN   0-14-028032-4.