Waterville, Ohio

Last updated
Waterville, Ohio
Waterville Commercial District, Third Street.jpg
Third Street downtown
Motto(s): 
"at the banks of history"
Lucas County Ohio incorporated and unincorporated areas Waterville highlighted.svg
Location in Lucas County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 41°30′5″N83°43′38″W / 41.50139°N 83.72722°W / 41.50139; -83.72722 Coordinates: 41°30′5″N83°43′38″W / 41.50139°N 83.72722°W / 41.50139; -83.72722
Country United States
State Ohio
County Lucas
Government
   Mayor Lori Brodie (R) [1]
Area
[2]
  Total4.88 sq mi (12.64 km2)
  Land4.69 sq mi (12.15 km2)
  Water0.19 sq mi (0.49 km2)
Population
 (2010) [3]
  Total5,523
  Estimate 
(2018 [4] )
5,517
  Density1,177.6/sq mi (454.7/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
43566
Area code(s) 419
Website http://www.waterville.org/

Waterville is a city in Lucas County, Ohio, United States, along the Maumee River, a suburb of Toledo. The population was 5,523 at the 2010 census.

Lucas County, Ohio County in the United States

Lucas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio and bordered on the east by Lake Erie, and on the southeast by the Maumee River, which runs to the lake. As of the 2010 census, the population was 441,815. Its county seat is Toledo, located at the mouth of the Maumee River on the lake. The county was named for Robert Lucas, 12th governor of Ohio, in 1835 during his second term. Its establishment provoked the Toledo War conflict with the Michigan Territory, which claimed some of its area.

Ohio State of the United States of America

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Of the fifty states, it is the 34th largest by area, the seventh most populous, and the tenth most densely populated. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

Maumee River river in the United States of America

The Maumee River is a river running from northeastern Indiana into northwestern Ohio and Lake Erie in the United States. It is formed at the confluence of the St. Joseph and St. Marys rivers, where Fort Wayne, Indiana, has developed, and meanders northeastwardly for 137 miles (220 km) through an agricultural region of glacial moraines before flowing into the Maumee Bay of Lake Erie. The city of Toledo is located at the mouth of the Maumee. The Maumee was designated an Ohio State Scenic River on July 18, 1974. The Maumee watershed is Ohio’s breadbasket; it is two-thirds farmland, mostly corn and soybeans. It is the largest watershed of any of the rivers feeding the Great Lakes, and supplies five percent of Lake Erie’s water.

Contents

Geography

Waterville is located at 41°30′5″N83°43′38″W / 41.50139°N 83.72722°W / 41.50139; -83.72722 (41.501252, -83.727200). [5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.88 square miles (12.64 km2), of which 4.69 square miles (12.15 km2) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.49 km2) is water. [2]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

The community is located on the Maumee River and was formerly on the Miami and Erie Canal route.

Miami and Erie Canal canal

The Miami and Erie Canal was a 274-mile (441 km) canal that ran from Cincinnati to Toledo, Ohio, creating a water route between the Ohio River and Lake Erie. Construction on the canal began in 1825 and was completed in 1845 at a cost to the state government of $8,062,680.07. At its peak, it included 19 aqueducts, three guard locks, 103 canal locks, multiple feeder canals, and a few man-made water reservoirs. The canal climbed 395 feet (120 m) above Lake Erie and 513 feet (156 m) above the Ohio River to reach a topographical peak called the Loramie Summit, which extended 19 miles (31 km) between New Bremen, Ohio to lock 1-S in Lockington, north of Piqua, Ohio. Boats up to 80 feet long were towed along the canal by mules, horses, or oxen walking on a prepared towpath along the bank, at a rate of four to five miles per hour.

History

The Nawash-Kinjoano Reservation, an Ottawa reservation located along the Maumee River just west of Waterville, was established in 1807. It was dissolved in 1831. [6]

The Nawash-Kinjoano Reservation was an Ottawa reservation located along the Maumee River in Northwestern Ohio until slightly after 1830.

Waterville was platted in 1830 by settler John Pray on the west bank of the upper Maumee River opposite what was then known as Pray's Falls, a rapids on that stream. [7] A post office called Waterville has been in operation since 1828. [8]

Plat scale map showing the divisions of a piece of land

In the United States, a plat is a map, drawn to scale, showing the divisions of a piece of land. United States General Land Office surveyors drafted township plats of Public Lands Surveys to show the distance and bearing between section corners, sometimes including topographic or vegetation information. City, town or village plats show subdivisions into blocks with streets and alleys. Further refinement often splits blocks into individual lots, usually for the purpose of selling the described lots; this has become known as subdivision.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 382
1890 58653.4%
1900 70320.0%
1910 83418.6%
1920 779−6.6%
1930 97324.9%
1940 961−1.2%
1950 1,11015.5%
1960 1,85667.2%
1970 2,94058.4%
1980 3,88432.1%
1990 4,51716.3%
2000 4,8286.9%
2010 5,52314.4%
Est. 20185,517 [4] −0.1%
Sources: [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14]

2010 census

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 5,523 people, 2,065 households, and 1,566 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,177.6 inhabitants per square mile (454.7/km2). There were 2,151 housing units at an average density of 458.6 per square mile (177.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.5% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.7% of the population.

There were 2,065 households of which 38.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.2% were non-families. 20.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.03.

The median age in the city was 41.6 years. 25.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.8% were from 25 to 44; 31.3% were from 45 to 64; and 13.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [13] of 2000, there were 4,828 people, 1,726 households, and 1,322 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,378.7 people per square mile (532.6/km²). There were 1,809 housing units at an average density of 516.6 per square mile (199.6/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.91% White, 0.14% African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.56% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.35% of the population.

There were 1,726 households out of which 39.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.6% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.4% were non-families. 19.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the village the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $60,000, and the median income for a family was $71,027. Males had a median income of $49,489 versus $31,638 for females. The per capita income for the village was $23,679. About 1.9% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.

Government

The City of Waterville is organized as a Strong Administrator form of government. The City Administrator is the CEO of the Municipal Corporation, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the City. The mayor (currently Lori Brodie) and City Council members (currently Barb Bruno, Tim Pedro, Anthony Bruno, Rodney Frey, Mary Duncan and John Rozic) serve part-time.

The City has a full-time police department and public works department. The fire department is staffed by a full-time fire chief and deputy chief, and is supported by a combination of part-time and volunteer fire fighters.

Historic sites

The Interurban Bridge, also known as the Ohio Electric Railroad Bridge. is a historic interurban railroad bridge built in 1908 across the Maumee River joining Lucas and Wood counties near Waterville, Ohio. It is now located in Farnsworth Metropark. One of the bridge's supports is the Roche de Boeuf, a historic Indian council rock, which was partially destroyed by the bridge construction. On June 19, 1972, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge has been abandoned for several years.

Built in 1828, John Pray constructed a house to serve as a trading post, tavern and hostel located in Waterville, OH. It became the centerpiece of the village. The place where locals and travelers alike escaped from the harsh Summers and Winters. Constructed from black walnut beams, it quickly transformed into a third-story structure containing a prison cell (for transit prisoners), a dressmaker's shop and doctor. Like many historic buildings, this one switched hands many times over the years, becoming a restaurant between 1943 and 1993 [15]

Education

Anthony Wayne School District administers public schools in the city. [16]

Waterville has a public library, a branch of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library. [17]

Parks

BAER PARK - Waterville’s Baer Park is nestled at the end of North Fifth Street in Waterville. Baer Park offers fun for all ages with playground equipment, a baseball field, basketball courts, tennis courts, and a shuffleboard area. Baer Park is also popular for soccer and cheerleading practice during the fall and spring.

Whether you want to take on your buddies in a pick-up game or take the family dog for a walk, Baer Park is a great place to spend a few hours. The Walking Path at Baer Park is 3/10 of a mile. [18]

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "Office Holder Details". Lucas County Board of Elections. 31 December 2015. p. 20. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  2. 1 2 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  3. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  4. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. Tanner, Helen Hornbeck. Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987) p. 134, 165.
  7. Waggoner, Clark (1888). History of the City of Toledo and Lucas County, Ohio. Munsell & Company. p. 916.
  8. "Lucas County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  9. "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  10. "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013.
  11. "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  12. "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013.
  13. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  14. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013.
  15. http://www.whatwasthere.com/browse.aspx#!/ll/41.499179,-83.717223/id/64580/info/details/zoom/14/
  16. "Schools". City of Waterville, Ohio. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  17. "Hours & Locations". Toledo-Lucas County Public Library. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  18. https://waterville.org/parks/ . Retrieved 9 January 2019.Missing or empty |title= (help)