962

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
962 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 962
CMLXII
Ab urbe condita 1715
Armenian calendar 411
ԹՎ ՆԺԱ
Assyrian calendar 5712
Balinese saka calendar 883–884
Bengali calendar 369
Berber calendar 1912
Buddhist calendar 1506
Burmese calendar 324
Byzantine calendar 6470–6471
Chinese calendar 辛酉(Metal  Rooster)
3658 or 3598
     to 
壬戌年 (Water  Dog)
3659 or 3599
Coptic calendar 678–679
Discordian calendar 2128
Ethiopian calendar 954–955
Hebrew calendar 4722–4723
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1018–1019
 - Shaka Samvat 883–884
 - Kali Yuga 4062–4063
Holocene calendar 10962
Iranian calendar 340–341
Islamic calendar 350–351
Japanese calendar Ōwa 2
(応和2年)
Javanese calendar 862–863
Julian calendar 962
CMLXII
Korean calendar 3295
Minguo calendar 950 before ROC
民前950年
Nanakshahi calendar −506
Seleucid era 1273/1274 AG
Thai solar calendar 1504–1505
Tibetan calendar 阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1088 or 707 or −65
     to 
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1089 or 708 or −64
King Otto I (the Great) is crowned with the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire. Weltliche Schatzkammer Wien (190)2.JPG
King Otto I (the Great) is crowned with the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire.

Year 962 ( CMLXII ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2015 and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

Nikephoros II Phokas Byzantine emperor

Nikephoros II Phokas was Byzantine Emperor from 963 to 969. His brilliant military exploits contributed to the resurgence of the Byzantine Empire during the 10th century. His reign, however, included controversy. In the west, he inflamed conflict with the Bulgarians and saw Sicily completely turn over to the Muslims, while he failed to make any serious gains in Italy following the incursions of Otto I. Meanwhile, in the east, he completed the conquest of Cilicia and even retook the island of Cyprus, thus opening the path for subsequent Byzantine incursions reaching as far as the Jazira and the Levant. His administrative policy was less successful, as in order to finance these wars he increased taxes both on the people and on the church, while maintaining unpopular theological positions and alienating many of his most powerful allies. These included his nephew John Tzimiskes, who would take the throne after killing Nikephoros in his sleep.

Bilad al-Sham Wikimedia list article

Bilad al-Sham was a Rashidun, Umayyad and later Abbasid Caliphate province in what is now the Levant. It incorporated former Byzantine territories of the Diocese of the East, organized soon after the Muslim conquest of the Levant in the mid-7th century, which was completed at the decisive Battle of Yarmouk. The term "Bilad al-Sham" means "land to the north", literally "land on the left-hand" relative to someone in the Hejaz facing east.

Aleppo City in Aleppo Governorate, Syria

Aleppo is a city in Syria, serving as the capital of the Aleppo Governorate, the most populous Syrian governorate. With an official population of 4.6 million in 2010, Aleppo was the largest Syrian city before the Syrian Civil War; however, now Aleppo is probably the second-largest city in Syria after the capital Damascus.

Europe

February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 332 days remaining until the end of the year.

Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor German king and first emperor of the Ottonian empire

Otto I, traditionally known as Otto the Great, was German king from 936 and Holy Roman Emperor from 962 until his death in 973. He was the oldest son of Henry I the Fowler and Matilda.

The Holy Roman Emperor was the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire during the medieval and early modern periods. The title was, almost without interruption, held in conjunction with title of King of Germany throughout the 12th to 18th centuries.

England

Indulf King of Scots

Ildulb mac Causantín, anglicised as Indulf, nicknamed An Ionsaighthigh, "the Aggressor" was king of Scots from 954. He was the son of Constantine II ; his mother may have been a daughter of Earl Eadulf I of Bernicia, who was an exile in Scotland.

Scottish people ethnic inhabitants of Scotland

The Scottish people or Scots, are a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland. Historically, they emerged from an amalgamation of two Celtic-speaking peoples, the Picts and Gaels, who founded the Kingdom of Scotland in the 9th century. Later, the neighbouring Celtic-speaking Cumbrians, as well as Germanic-speaking Anglo-Saxons and Norse, were incorporated into the Scottish nation.

Picts ancient and medieval tribal confederation in northern Britain

The Picts were a confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age and Early Medieval periods. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of Brittonic place name elements and Pictish stones. The name Picts appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels. They lived to the north of the rivers Forth and Clyde, and spoke the Pictish language, which was closely related to the Celtic Brittonic language spoken by the Britons who lived to the south of them.

By topic

Religion

St Pauls Cathedral Church in London

St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London and is a Grade I listed building. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London. The cathedral building largely destroyed in the Great Fire, now often referred to as Old St Paul's Cathedral, was a central focus for medieval and early modern London, including Paul's walk and St. Paul's Churchyard being the site of St. Paul's Cross.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Births

Bernard-Roger, Count of Bigorre Count of Bigorre

Bernard Roger was the count of Couserans, in which capacity he was lord of parts of Comminges and Foix.

Nobility privileged social class

Nobility is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary, and vary by country and era. The Medieval chivalric motto "noblesse oblige", meaning literally "nobility obligates", explains that privileges carry a lifelong obligation of duty to uphold various social responsibilities of, e.g., honorable behavior, customary service, or leadership roles or positions, that lives on by a familial or kinship bond.

Edward the Martyr King of the English

Edward the Martyr was King of England from 975 until he was murdered in 978. Edward was the eldest son of King Edgar the Peaceful but was not his father's acknowledged heir. On Edgar's death, the leadership of England was contested, with some supporting Edward's claim to be king and others supporting his younger half-brother Æthelred the Unready, recognized as a legitimate son of Edgar. Edward was chosen as king and was crowned by his main clerical supporters, the archbishops Dunstan of Canterbury and Oswald of Worcester.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

814 Year

Year 814 (DCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

The 950s decade ran from January 1, 950, to December 31, 959.

The 960s decade ran from January 1, 960, to December 31, 969.

969 Year

Year 969 (CMLXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

967 Year

Year 967 (CMLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

966 Year

Year 966 (CMLXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1002 Year

Year 1002 (MII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

961 Year

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

963 Year

Year 963 (CMLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

952 Year

Year 952 (CMLII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

950 Year

Year 950 (CML) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

956 Year

Year 956 (CMLVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

975 Year

Year 975 (CMLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

970 Year

Year 970 (CMLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 915 (CMXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

912 Year

Year 912 (CMXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

895 Year

Year 895 (DCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

944 Year

Year 944 (CMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 251. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.