Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXIX Olympiad
Usain Bolt Olympics Celebration.jpg
Bolt after winning the 100m final
Venue Beijing National Stadium
Dates15 August (heats and quarterfinals)
16 August (semifinals and final)
Competitors80 from 64 nations
Winning time9.69 WR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Usain Bolt
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Silver medal icon.svg Richard Thompson
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Bronze medal icon.svg Walter Dix
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
  2004
2012  
Official Video Highlights TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 15 and 16 August at the Beijing National Stadium. [1] Eighty athletes from 64 nations competed. [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by Jamaican Usain Bolt in a world record time of 9.69 seconds. It was Jamaica's first title in the event, and first medal in the event since 1976. Jamaica became the first country to join the men's 100 metre winners since Trinidad and Tobago, also in 1976; Richard Thompson won that country's fourth overall medal in the event with his silver.

Contents

Holding a considerable lead 70 metres into the race, Bolt opened his arms in celebration before slapping his chest. British athlete and television presenter Kriss Akabusi criticized this gesture as showboating, noting that it cost Bolt an even faster record time. [3] IOC president Jacques Rogge also criticized Bolt's actions as disrespectful. [4] [5] Bolt denied that this was the purpose of his mid-race celebration by saying "I wasn't bragging. When I saw I wasn't covered, I was just happy." [6]

Summary

Prior to the 2008 season, Usain Bolt was known as a 200-metre sprinter, having set the world youth best in the event four years earlier. He only dabbled in the 100 metres the year before with a one off race in Rethymno. While people were impressed with his 10.03, [7] it didn't strike fear in the 9.9 sprinters around the world. In early May, he talked his coach into letting him try the 100 again, his 9.76 was the second fastest in history, only .02 behind fellow Jamaican Asafa Powell's world record. [8] At the end of the month he entered another 100 metres at the Adidas Grand Prix in New York City. The result was a new world record 9.72.

While Bolt's slow starts were seen as a liability, once he got moving, nobody seemed able to match his top end speed. He easily had the fastest times in both the quarterfinal and semi-final rounds, while injured Gay and Obikwelu were eliminated. The center lanes of the final, reserved for the fastest qualifiers, included Bolt, Powell, Dix and another collegiate phenom from LSU, Richard Thompson.

In the final, the third Jamaican in the race, Michael Frater got the best start, along with Thompson and Darvis Patton. 30 metres into the race, Bolt was into his full running position and had pulled even with the leader, Thompson. By the next 20 metres, Bolt was simply pulling away, with Thompson breaking up a Jamaican sweep of Frater and Powell. 20 metres before the finish, already with a 3-metre lead, Bolt held out his arms in celebration. Behind him, Dix and Churandy Martina were making a late rush to pick off Frater and Powell. Turning to look back at his vanquished competition, Bolt crossed the finish line sideways, still with the "showboating" and lack of form, his time was a new world record, 9.69. Thompson later said "I could see him slowing down ahead as I was still pumping away." [9]

Background

This was the twenty-sixth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. Four finalists from 2004 returned: silver medalist Francis Obikwelu of Portugal, fifth-place finisher Asafa Powell of Jamaica, sixth-place finisher Kim Collins of Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Aziz Zakari of Ghana, who had been unable to finish the final. Collins and Zakari had also been to the final in 2000. Defending gold medalist Justin Gatlin was banned at the time for failing a second drugs test, testing positive for testosterone. [10]

In Gatlin's absence, the United States team was led by Tyson Gay, the reigning world champion, but who had suffered a hamstring injury at the U.S. trials. An ascendant Jamaican team included Powell, who had held the world record from 2005 to 2008, and Usain Bolt, who had taken the world record in May of 2008. [2]

The Czech Republic, the Marshall Islands, and Tuvalu appeared in the event for the first time. The United States made its 25rd appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Qualification

Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) was able to enter up to three entrants providing they had met the A qualifying standard (10.21) in the qualifying period (1 January 2007 to 23 July 2008). NOCs were also permitted to enter one athlete providing he had met the B standard (10.28) in the same qualifying period. [11]

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in both the heats and quarterfinals.

The first round consisted of 10 heats, each with 8 or 9 athletes. The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next ten fastest runners overall. This made 40 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 5 heats of 8 runners. The top three runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with one "fastest loser" place. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2]

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World recordFlag of Jamaica.svg  Usain Bolt  (JAM)9.72 s New York City, United States31 May 2008
Olympic recordFlag of Canada.svg  Donovan Bailey  (CAN)9.84 s Atlanta, United States27 July 1996

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

DateEventAthleteTimeORWR
16 AugustFinalFlag of Jamaica.svg  Usain Bolt  (JAM)9.69 sORWR

Schedule

All times are China Standard Time (UTC+8)

DateTimeRound
Friday, 15 August 200809:45
19:45
Heats
Quarterfinals
Saturday, 16 August 200820:00
22:30
Semifinals
Final

Disqualification

Eight years after the event, the IOC reanalyzed doping samples and disqualified Samuel Francis for having stanozolol in his sample. [12]

Results

Heats

The first round was held on 15 August. The first three runners of each heat plus the next ten overall fastest runners qualified for the second round.

Heat 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.18610.20Q
29 Daniel Bailey Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.19810.24Q
36 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.16810.26Q, SB
42 Henry Vizcaíno Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 0.15710.28q
54 Fabio Cerutti Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.13610.49
65 Jurgen Themen Flag of Suriname.svg  Suriname 0.17910.61PB
78 Moses Kamut Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu 0.18110.81
87 Francis Manioru Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 0.19711.09
Wind: -0.2 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14210.16Q
23 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.16210.17Q
37 Craig Pickering Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.17410.21Q
42 Daniel Grueso Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 0.17810.35q
59 Dariusz Kuć Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.14410.44q
68 Béranger Bosse Flag of the Central African Republic.svg  Central African Republic 0.14410.51SB
76 Aisea Tohi Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 0.15911.17
84 Roman William Cress Flag of the Marshall Islands.svg  Marshall Islands 0.19011.18
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Heat 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
18 Richard Thompson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.18810.24Q
25 Martial Mbandjock Flag of France.svg  France 0.16210.26Q
34 Simone Collio Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.14010.32Q
42 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.17710.34q
56 Andrew Hinds Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.14010.35q
63 Suryo Agung Wibowo Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 0.17510.46
77 Jared Lewis Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.svg  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 0.12311.00
89 Rabangaki Nawai Flag of Kiribati.svg  Kiribati 0.15211.29SB
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Heat 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15610.15Q
24 Pierre Browne Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.14110.22Q
36 Darrel Brown Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.13910.22Q
47 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.16010.25q
59 Holder da Silva Flag of Guinea-Bissau.svg  Guinea-Bissau 0.18410.58
62 Idrissa Sanou Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 0.17110.63
78 Ghyd-Kermeliss-Holly Olonghot Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo 0.17211.01
85 Massoud Azizi Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan 0.16011.45
Wind: 0.2 m/s

Heat 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
12 Tyson Gay Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14810.22Q
25 Olusoji A. Fasuba Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.15610.29Q
34 José Carlos Moreira Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.19210.29Q
47 Ángel David Rodríguez Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0.14510.34q
59 Lukas Milo Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 0.14510.52
68 Mhadjou Youssouf Flag of the Comoros.svg  Comoros 0.17010.62PB
73 Danny D'Souza Flag of Seychelles.svg  Seychelles 0.18011.00
86 Shanahan Sanitoa Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa 0.15812.60
Wind: 0.7 m/s

Heat 6

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Tyrone Edgar Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.13810.13Q
26 Darvis Patton Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14910.25Q
37 Ronald Pognon Flag of France.svg  France 0.16710.26Q
42 Hu Kai Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.15210.39q
54 Abdullah Al-Sooli Flag of Oman.svg  Oman 0.15310.53PB
68 Desislav Gunev Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 0.15210.66
73 Ali Shareef Flag of Maldives.svg  Maldives 0.17111.11NR
89 Souksavanh Tonsacktheva Flag of Laos.svg  Laos 0.18311.51
Wind: 0.9 m/s

Heat 7

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.19010.25Q
22 Obinna Metu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.17610.34Q
35 Walter Dix Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.16710.35Q
46 Anson Henry Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.13810.37q
58 Dmytro Hlushchenko Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 0.20010.57
63 Calvin Kang Li Loong Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 0.14010.73
79 Jesse Tamangrow Flag of Palau.svg  Palau 0.14611.38PB
87 Reginaldo Micha Ndong Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 0.24211.61
Wind: -1.4 m/s

Heat 8

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Derrick Atkins Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.16210.28Q
24 Andrey Yepishin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.17210.34Q
39 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0.16410.37Q
46 Uchenna Emedolu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.19210.46
52 Suwaibou Sanneh Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 0.15710.52
65 Sandro Viana Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.16010.60
77 Lai Chun Ho Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong 0.19910.63
88 Mohamed Abu Abdullah Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 0.17411.07
Wind: -0.1 m/s

Heat 9

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Samuel Francis Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 0.15310.40 DSQQ
25 Marc Burns Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.16010.46Q
39 Matic Osovnikar Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 0.18710.46Q
47 Rolando Palacios Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 0.18910.49
52 Ruslan Abbasov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 0.15410.58
64 Sébastien Gattuso Flag of Monaco.svg  Monaco 0.16410.70
78 Jack Howard Flag of the Federated States of Micronesia.svg  Federated States of Micronesia 0.20411.03
83 Gordon Heather Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 0.21411.41PB
Wind: -1.7 m/s

Heat 10

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.16410.35Q
25 Naoki Tsukahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.16910.39Q
36 Simeon Williamson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.18310.42Q
49 Tobias Unger Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.16110.46q
58 Franklin Nazareno Flag of Ecuador (1900-2009).svg  Ecuador 0.17810.60
67 Wilfried Bingangoye Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.17110.87
72 Moumi Sebergue Flag of Chad.svg  Chad 0.21011.14
83 Okilani Tinilau Flag of Tuvalu.svg  Tuvalu 0.17411.48NR
Wind: -1.3 m/s

Quarterfinals

The quarterfinals were held on 15 August. The first three runners of each heat plus the next overall fastest runner qualified for the semifinals.

Quarterfinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.1429.99Q, NR
27 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15410.09Q
36 Naoki Tsukahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.15610.23Q, SB
49 Simeon Williamson Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.12710.32
53 Henry Vizcaíno Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 0.16710.33
65 Pierre Browne Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.14410.36
72 Dariusz Kuć Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.17610.46
88 Darrel Brown Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.11910.93
Wind: -0.1 m/s

Quarterfinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Richard Thompson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.1709.99Q
24 Tyson Gay Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14610.09Q
37 Martial Mbandjock Flag of France.svg  France 0.16010.16Q
45 Olusoji A. Fasuba Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.14710.21
52 Andrew Hinds Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.14810.25
68 José Carlos Moreira Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.19310.32
79 Simone Collio Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 0.13810.33
83 Daniel Grueso Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 0.19310.37
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Quarterfinal 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Marc Burns Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.17410.05Q
24 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.15010.07Q, =SB
35 Tyrone Edgar Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.13010.10Q
47 Samuel Francis Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 0.16410.11 DSQQ
59 Ronald Pognon Flag of France.svg  France 0.16710.21
68 Matic Osovnikar Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 0.17110.24
72 Tobias Unger Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.13610.36
83 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.14510.37
Wind: -0.2 m/s

Quarterfinal 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
17 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1659.92Q
25 Darvis Patton Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.15910.04Q
34 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.16810.09Q
48 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0.13310.14
59 Craig Pickering Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14410.18
66 Obinna Metu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.17410.27
73 Anson Henry Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.14210.33
82 Ángel David Rodríguez Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0.15410.35
Wind: 0.1 m/s

Quarterfinal 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
17 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14910.02Q
29 Walter Dix Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.16310.08Q
35 Derrick Atkins Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.17910.14Q
44 Daniel Bailey Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.14910.23
53 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.16710.24
66 Andrey Yepishin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.15810.25
78 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.15710.31
82 Hu Kai Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.16510.40
Wind: -0.1 m/s

Semifinals

The semifinals were held on 16 August. The first four runners from each semifinal qualified for the final.

Semifinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
17 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1619.85Q
26 Walter Dix Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1439.95Q, SB
34 Marc Burns Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.1249.97Q, =SB
49 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.16310.01Q
55 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.16310.05SB
62 Derrick Atkins Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.15910.13
78 Tyrone Edgar Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14310.18
3 Samuel Francis Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 0.14610.20 DSQ
Wind: -0.1 m/s

Semifinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1619.91Q
27 Richard Thompson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.1759.93Q, =PB
35 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.1389.94Q, NR
44 Darvis Patton Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14910.03Q
59 Tyson Gay Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14510.05
68 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.15710.10
73 Naoki Tsukahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.14310.16SB
82 Martial Mbandjock Flag of France.svg  France 0.14810.18
Wind: 0.3 m/s

Final

The final was held on 16 August.

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg4 Usain Bolt Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1659.69 WR
Silver medal icon.svg5 Richard Thompson Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.1339.89PB
Bronze medal icon.svg6 Walter Dix Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1339.91PB
49 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.1699.93NR
57 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1349.95
62 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1479.97PB
78 Marc Burns Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.14510.01
83 Darvis Patton Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14210.03
Wind: 0.0 m/s
Bolt held a considerable lead over his rivals in the closing stages of the 100 m final Usain Bolt winning.jpg
Bolt held a considerable lead over his rivals in the closing stages of the 100 m final

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