By-elections to the 20th Canadian Parliament

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By-elections to the 20th Canadian Parliament were held to fill vacancies in the House of Commons of Canada between the 1945 federal election and the 1949 federal election. The Liberal Party of Canada led a working majority government for the 20th Canadian Parliament, though was technically a minority government during World War II.

Shortly before the dissolution of the 20th Canadian Parliament, Newfoundland joined Confederation as the tenth province. Unlike the case when the provinces such as Manitoba, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island joined, by-elections were not called to fill the new province's seven seats.

Eighteen vacant seats were filled through by-elections.

By-electionDateIncumbentPartyWinnerPartyCauseRetained
Nicolet—Yamaska February 7, 1949 Lucien Dubois      Independent Liberal Renaud Chapdelaine      Progressive Conservative DeathNo
Carleton December 20, 1948 George Russell Boucher      Progressive Conservative George A. Drew      Progressive Conservative Resignation to provide a seat for DrewYes
Laval—Two Mountains December 20, 1948 Liguori Lacombe      Independent Léopold Demers      Liberal ResignationNo
Marquette December 20, 1948 James Allison Glen      Liberal Stuart Sinclair Garson      Liberal ResignationYes
Digby—Annapolis—Kings December 13, 1948 James Lorimer Ilsley      Liberal George Clyde Nowlan      Progressive Conservative ResignationNo
Algoma East October 25, 1948 Thomas Farquhar      Liberal Lester B. Pearson      Liberal Called to the SenateYes
Rosthern October 25, 1948 Walter Adam Tucker      Liberal William Albert Boucher      Liberal ResignationYes
Ontario June 8, 1948 W. E. N. Sinclair      Liberal Arthur Henry Williams      CCF DeathNo
Vancouver Centre June 8, 1948 Ian Alistair Mackenzie      Liberal Rodney Young      CCF Called to the SenateNo
Yale May 31, 1948 Grote Stirling      Progressive Conservative Owen Lewis Jones      CCF ResignationNo
York—Sunbury October 20, 1947 H. Francis G. Bridges      Liberal Milton Gregg      Liberal DeathYes
Halifax July 14, 1947 William Chisholm Macdonald      Liberal John Dickey      Liberal DeathYes
Cartier March 31, 1947 Fred Rose      Labor-Progressive Maurice Hartt      Liberal Seat declared vacant by resolution of the House of CommonsNo
Richelieu—Verchères December 23, 1946 Arthur Cardin      Independent Gérard Cournoyer      Liberal DeathNo
Parkdale October 21, 1946 Herbert A. Bruce      Progressive Conservative Harold Timmins      Progressive Conservative ResignationYes
Portage la Prairie October 21, 1946 Harry Leader      Liberal Calvert Charlton Miller      Progressive Conservative DeathNo
Pontiac September 16, 1946 Wallace McDonald      Liberal Réal Caouette      Social Credit DeathNo
Glengarry August 6, 1945 William B. MacDiarmid      Liberal William Lyon Mackenzie King      Liberal Resignation to provide a seat for Mackenzie KingYes

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