1953 Canadian federal election

Last updated
1953 Canadian federal election
Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg
  1949 August 10, 1953 1957  

265 seats in the House of Commons
133 seats needed for a majority
Turnout67.5% [1] (Decrease2.svg6.3pp)
 First partySecond party
  Louis St. Laurent 1954 37112.jpg GeorgeDrew.jpg
Leader Louis St. Laurent George A. Drew
Party Liberal Progressive Conservative
Leader since August 7, 1948 October 2, 1948
Leader's seat Quebec East Carleton
Last election19141
Seats won16951
Seat changeDecrease2.svg22Increase2.svg10
Popular vote2,731,6331,749,579
Percentage48.43%31.02%
SwingDecrease2.svg0.72pp Increase2.svg1.37pp

 Third partyFourth party
  Major James Coldwell.jpg Solon Earl Low cropped.jpg
Leader Major James Coldwell Solon Earl Low
Party Co-operative Commonwealth Social Credit
Leader since March 22, 1942 April 6, 1944
Leader's seat Rosetown—Biggar Peace River
Last election1310
Seats won2315
Seat changeIncrease2.svg10Increase2.svg5
Popular vote636,310304,553
Percentage11.28%5.40%
SwingDecrease2.svg2.14pp Increase2.svg3.09pp

Canada 1953 Federal Election.svg

Chambre des Communes 1953.png
The Canadian parliament after the 1953 election

Prime Minister before election

Louis St. Laurent
Liberal

Prime Minister after election

Louis St. Laurent
Liberal

The 1953 Canadian federal election was held on August 10, 1953 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 22nd Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent led his Liberal Party of Canada to its second consecutive majority government, although the party lost seats to the other parties.

Contents

The Progressive Conservative Party, led by former Premier of Ontario, George Drew, formed the official opposition. However, for the last time until 1993, the party was unable to win the popular vote in any of Canada's provinces or territories.

This was the last election until 1988 in which any party won back-to-back majorities, and the last until 1997 in which the Liberals would accomplish this feat.

Electoral system

Most of the MPs were elected as the single member for their district, through First past the post. Four MPs were elected in multi-member ridings. These were in Halifax and Queen's (PEI). They were elected through Block Voting.

National results

1953 Canadian parliament.svg
PartyParty leader# of
candidates
SeatsPopular vote
1949 Elected% Change#% pp Change
  Liberal Louis St. Laurent 262191169-11.5%2,731,63348.43%-0.72
  Progressive Conservative George Drew 2484151+24.4%1,749,57931.02%+1.37
  Co-operative Commonwealth M.J. Coldwell 1701323+76.9%636,31011.28%-2.14
Social Credit Solon Low 711015+50%304,5535.40%+3.09
 Independent1443-25.0%58,4581.04%-1.01
 Independent Liberal1912+100%68,5061.21%+0.69
  Liberal-Labour 1 111-11,3800.20%-
Liberal–Progressive  111-8,9580.16%-
Labor–Progressive Tim Buck 100---59,6221.06%+0.50
 Nationalist Adrien Arcand 1*-*7,4960.13%*
 Independent Progressive Conservative3---1,6360.03%-0.11
  Christian Liberal  1*-*1,5050.03%*
 Independent Social Credit1---4220.01%-0.07
 Locataire (candidat) 1*-*4170.01%*
  Anti-Communist  1*-*3330.01%*
  Socialist Labour  1---130xx
Total897262265+1.1%5,640,938100% 
Sources: http://www.elections.ca History of Federal Ridings since 1867 Archived 2008-12-04 at the Wayback Machine

Notes:

* - not applicable - the party was not recognized in the previous election

x - less than 0.005% of the popular vote

1 The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus.

Results by province

Party name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL NW YK Total
  Liberal Seats:845750667103711169
 Vote (%):30.935.137.337.046.061.052.753.051.167.249.478.748.4
  Progressive Conservative Seats:32133343110--51
 Vote (%):14.114.511.727.040.329.441.940.148.028.138.521.331.0
  Co-operative Commonwealth Seats:7-1131--1--  23
 Vote (%):26.66.944.223.611.11.53.06.70.80.6  11.3
  Social Credit Seats:411--- -     15
 Vote (%):26.140.75.36.30.3 0.4     5.4
 IndependentSeats: - --3   -- 3
 Vote (%): 0.1 0.20.33.0   4.012.4 1.0
 Independent LiberalSeats:   --2-     2
 Vote (%):   4.00.33.71.9     1.2
  Liberal–Labour Seats:    1       1
 Vote (%):    0.6       0.2
  Liberal-Progressive Seats:   1        1
 Vote (%):   3.3        0.2
Total Seats 22171714857510124711265
Parties that won no seats:
Labor–Progressive Vote (%):2.22.71.12.31.00.7 0.2    1.1
 NationalistVote (%):     0.5      0.1
 Independent PCVote (%):     0.1      xx
  Christian Liberal Vote (%):    0.1       xx
Independent Social CreditVote (%): 0.1          xx
 Locataire (candidat)Vote (%):     xx      xx
  Anti-Communist Vote (%):     xx      xx
  Socialist Labour Vote (%):    xx       xx

See also

Related Research Articles

1921 Canadian federal election 14th Canadian federal election

The 1921 Canadian federal election was held on December 6, 1921, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 14th Parliament of Canada. The Union government that had governed Canada through the First World War was defeated, and replaced by a Liberal government under the young leader William Lyon Mackenzie King. A new third party, the Progressive Party, won the second most seats in the election.

1988 Canadian federal election 34th Canadian federal election

The 1988 Canadian federal election was held on November 21, 1988, to elect members to the House of Commons of Canada of the 34th Parliament of Canada. It was an election largely fought on a single issue: the Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA); the Progressive Conservative Party campaigned in favour of it whereas the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) campaigned against it.

1867 Canadian federal election 1st Canadian federal election

The 1867 Canadian federal election was held from August 7 to September 20, 1867, and was the first election for the new country of Canada. It was held to elect members representing electoral districts in the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec to the House of Commons of the 1st Canadian Parliament. The provinces of Manitoba (1870) and British Columbia (1871) were created during the term of the 1st Parliament of Canada and were not part of this election.

1968 Canadian federal election 28th Canadian federal election

The 1968 Canadian federal election was held on June 25, 1968, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 28th Parliament of Canada.

1896 Canadian federal election 8th Canadian federal election

The 1896 Canadian federal election was held on June 23, 1896, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 8th Parliament of Canada. Though the Conservative Party, led by Prime Minister Charles Tupper, won a plurality of the popular vote, the Liberal Party, led by Wilfrid Laurier, won the majority of seats to form the next government.

1980 Canadian federal election 32nd Canadian federal election

The 1980 Canadian federal election was held on February 18, 1980, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 32nd Parliament of Canada. It was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Prime Minister Joe Clark was defeated in the Commons.

1945 Canadian federal election 20th Canadian federal election

The 1945 Canadian federal election was held June 11, 1945, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 20th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal government was re-elected to its third consecutive government, although this time with a minority government as the Liberals fell five seats short of a majority.

1979 Canadian federal election 31st Canadian federal election

The 1979 Canadian federal election was held on May 22, 1979, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 31st Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the defeat of the Liberal Party of Canada after 11 years in power under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Joe Clark led the Progressive Conservative Party to power but with only a minority of seats in the House of Commons. The Liberals, however, beat the Progressive Conservatives in the overall popular vote by more than 400,000 votes. Taking office on the eve of his 40th birthday, Clark became the youngest prime minister in Canadian history.

1949 Canadian federal election 21st Canadian federal election

The 1949 Canadian federal election was held June 27, 1949 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 21st Parliament of Canada.

1958 Canadian federal election 24th Canadian federal election

The 1958 Canadian federal election was held to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 24th Parliament of Canada on March 31, 1958, just nine months after the 23rd election. It transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbaker's minority into the largest majority government in Canadian history and the second largest percentage of the popular vote. Although the Tories would surpass their 1958 seat total in the 1984 election, the 1958 result remains unmatched both in terms of percentage of seats (78.5%) and the size of the Government majority over all opposition parties. Voter turnout was 79.4%.

1962 Canadian federal election 25th Canadian federal election

The 1962 Canadian federal election was held on June 18, 1962, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 25th Parliament of Canada. The governing Progressive Conservative (PC) Party won a plurality of seats in this election, and its majority government was reduced to a minority government.

1963 Canadian federal election 26th Canadian federal election

The 1963 Canadian federal election was held on April 8, 1963 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 26th Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the defeat of the minority Progressive Conservative (Tory) government of Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, with the Liberals returning to power for the first time in 6 years, where they would remain for twenty of the next twenty-one years. For the Social Credit Party, despite getting their highest ever share of the vote, the party lost 6 seats compared to its high-water mark in 1962.

1965 Canadian federal election 27th Canadian federal election

The 1965 Canadian federal election was held on November 8, 1965 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 27th Parliament of Canada. The Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the House. Although the Liberals lost a small share of the popular vote, they were able to win more seats, falling just short of a majority.

1935 Canadian federal election 18th Canadian federal election

The 1935 Canadian federal election was held on October 14, 1935, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 18th Parliament of Canada. The Liberal Party of William Lyon Mackenzie King won a majority government, defeating Prime Minister R. B. Bennett's Conservatives.

1940 Canadian federal election 19th Canadian federal election

The 1940 Canadian federal election was held March 26, 1940, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 19th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal Party was re-elected to their second consecutive majority government.

1917 Canadian federal election 13th Canadian federal election

The 1917 Canadian federal election was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 13th Parliament of Canada. Described by historian Michael Bliss as the "most bitter election in Canadian history", it was fought mainly over the issue of conscription. The election resulted in Prime Minister Sir Robert Borden's Unionist government elected with a strong majority and the largest percentage of the popular vote for any party in Canadian history.

1930 Canadian federal election 17th Canadian federal election

The 1930 Canadian federal election was held on July 28, 1930, to elect members of the House of Commons of the 17th Parliament of Canada. Richard Bedford Bennett's Conservative Party won a majority government, defeating the Liberal Party led by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King.

1926 Canadian federal election 16th Canadian federal election

The 1926 Canadian federal election was held on September 14, 1926, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 16th Parliament of Canada. The election was called after an event known as the King–Byng affair.

1908 Canadian federal election 11th Canadian federal election

The 1908 Canadian federal election was held on Monday October 26, 1908 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 11th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier's Liberal Party of Canada was re-elected for a fourth consecutive term in government with a majority government. The Liberals lost four seats and a small share of the popular vote.

1904 Canadian federal election 10th Canadian federal election

The 1904 Canadian federal election was held on November 3, 1904 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 10th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a third term in government, with an increased majority, and over half of the popular vote.

References

  1. "Voter Turnout at Federal Elections and Referendums". Elections Canada. Retrieved 10 March 2019.

Further reading