1878 Canadian federal election

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1878 Canadian federal election
Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg
  1874 September 17, 1878 1882  

206 seats in the House of Commons
104 seats needed for a majority
Turnout69.1% [1] (Decrease2.svg0.5pp)
 First partySecond party
  Sir John A Macdonald circa 1878 retouched crop.jpg Alexander Mackenzie portrait crop.jpg
Leader John A. Macdonald Alexander Mackenzie
Party Conservative Liberal
Leader since18671873
Leader's seat Victoria [2] Lambton
Last election65 seats, 30.1%129 seats, 39.5%
Seats won13463
Seat changeIncrease2.svg69Decrease2.svg66
Popular vote229,151180,074
Percentage42.1%33.1%
SwingIncrease2.svg12.0%Decrease2.svg6.4%

Prime Minister before election

Alexander Mackenzie
Liberal

Prime Minister after election

John A. Macdonald
Conservative

The 1878 Canadian federal election was held on September 17 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 4th Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the end of Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie's Liberal government after only one term in office. Canada suffered an economic depression during Mackenzie's term, and his party was punished by the voters for it. The Liberals' policy of free trade also hurt their support with the business establishment in Toronto and Montreal.

Contents

Sir John A. Macdonald and his Conservative/Liberal-Conservative party was returned to office after having been defeated four years before amidst scandals over the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

National results

The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election Chambre des Communes 1878.png
The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election
1878 Canadian ele ctoral map Canada 1878 Federal Election.svg
1878 Canadian ele ctoral map
134639
ConservativeLiberalO
PartyParty leader# of candidatesSeatsPopular vote
1874 ElectedChange#%Change
  Conservative John A. Macdonald 10138 85+118.4%143,19226.28%+7.80pp
  Liberal-Conservative 602649+76.9%85,99915.78%+3.50pp
  Liberal Alexander Mackenzie 12112663-54.8%180,07433.05%-7.74pp
 Independent1145+25%14,7832.71%-0.48pp
 Independent Conservative222-1,0010.18%-0.76pp
 Unknown117- 114,04320.93%-1.93pp
 Independent Liberal411+100%5,3880.99%-
  Nationalist Conservative 1*1*4010.07%*
Total417197206+3.6%544,881100.0%-
Sources: http://www.elections.ca -- History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Note:

* Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

Acclamations

The following Members of Parliament were elected by acclamation;

Results by province

Party name BC MB ON QC NB NS PE Total
  Conservative Seats:12373318385
 Popular vote (%):-49.625.535.05.921.731.626.3
  Liberal-Conservative Seats:21231236249
 Vote (%):39.6-15.813.214.322.712.015.8
  Liberal Seats:2 271797163
 Vote (%):- 36.321.748.234.937.233.1
 IndependentSeats:1 112- 5
 Vote (%):12.2 1.51.613.14.3 2.7
 Independent ConservativeSeats: 1 1   2
 Vote (%): 50.4 0.7   0.2
 UnknownSeats: 
 Vote (%):48.2 19.927.414.814.719.320.9
 Independent LiberalSeats:   1- 1
 Vote (%):  1.0 3.71.7 1.0
 Nationalist ConservativeSeats:  1- 1
 Vote (%):   0.3   0.1
Total seats 6 4 88 65 16 21 6 206

Vote and seat summaries

Popular vote
Conservative
42.06%
Liberal
33.05%
Others
24.89%
Seat totals
Conservative
65.05%
Liberal
30.58%
Others
4.37%

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References

  1. "Voter Turnout at Federal Elections and Referendums". Elections Canada. Retrieved 10 March 2019.
  2. Macdonald initially ran in Kingston, where he was defeated. He then ran unopposed in Marquette, and following his appointment as Prime Minister was required by the convention at the time to vacate his seat and run again. On doing so, he chose to stand in Victoria rather than Marquette.

See also