1958 Canadian federal election

Last updated
1958 Canadian federal election
Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965).svg
  1957 March 31, 1958 1962  

265 seats in the House of Commons
133 seats needed for a majority
Turnout79.4% (Increase2.svg5.3pp)
 First partySecond party
  John G. Diefenbaker.jpg Lester Pearson 1957.jpg
Leader John Diefenbaker Lester B. Pearson
Party Progressive Conservative Liberal
Leader since December 14, 1956 January 16, 1958
Leader's seat Prince Albert Algoma East
Last election112105
Seats won20848
Seat changeIncrease2.svg96Decrease2.svg57
Popular vote3,910,8522,459,700
Percentage53.67%33.75%
SwingIncrease2.svg14.64pp Decrease2.svg8.58pp

 Third partyFourth party
  Major James Coldwell.jpg Solon Earl Low.jpg
Leader Major James Coldwell Solon Earl Low
Party Co-operative Commonwealth Social Credit
Leader since March 22, 1942 April 6, 1944
Leader's seat Rosetown—Biggar (lost re-election) Peace River
(lost re-election)
Last election2519
Seats won80
Seat changeDecrease2.svg17Decrease2.svg19
Popular vote692,398188,717
Percentage9.50%2.59%
SwingDecrease2.svg1.21pp Decrease2.svg4.03pp

Canada 1958 Federal Election.svg

Chambre des Communes 1958.png
The Canadian parliament after the 1958 election

Prime Minister before election

John Diefenbaker
Progressive Conservative

Prime Minister after election

John Diefenbaker
Progressive Conservative

The 1958 Canadian federal election was held to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 24th Parliament of Canada on March 31, 1958, just nine months after the 23rd election. It transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbaker's minority into the largest majority government in Canadian history and the second largest percentage of the popular vote. Although the Tories would surpass their 1958 seat total in the 1984 election, the 1958 result (achieved in a smaller House) remains unmatched both in terms of percentage of seats (78.5%) and the size of the Government majority over all opposition parties (a 151-seat majority). Voter turnout was 79.4%. [1]

Contents

Overview

Diefenbaker called a snap election and capitalized on three factors:

Electoral system

Most of the MPs were elected as the single member for their district, through First past the post. Four MPs were elected in multi-member ridings. These were in Halifax and Queen's (PEI). They were elected through Block Voting.

National results

1958 Canadian parliament.svg
PartyParty leader# of
candidates
SeatsPopular vote
1957 Elected % Change# % pp Change
  Progressive Conservative John Diefenbaker 265111208+87.4%3,908,63353.66%+14.85
  Liberal Lester B. Pearson 26410448-53.8%2,432,95333.40%-7.35
  Co-operative Commonwealth M.J. Coldwell 169258-68.0%692,6689.51%-1.20
  Liberal–Labour 1110%11,9560.16%-
Social Credit Solon Low 8219--100%188,3562.59%-3.99
 Independent92--100%14,2110.20%-0.87
 Independent Liberal102--100%12,0540.17%-1.25
Labor–Progressive Tim Buck 18---9,7690.13%+0.02
  Candidats des électeurs Réal Caouette 1---8,2760.11%-0.01
 Independent PC51--100%2,0970.03%-0.19
  Socialist 2*-*1,1130.02%*
 Capital familialH-G Grenier1*-*9680.01%*
  Radical chrétien 1*-*6870.01%*
 Independent SC1---361x-0.04
 Ouvrier canadien1*-*243x*
 Independent Conservative1*-*122x*
Total831265265-7,284,467100.00% 
Sources: http://www.elections.ca History of Federal Ridings since 1867 Archived 2008-12-04 at the Wayback Machine

Notes:

"Previous" refers to standings at previous election, not to standings in the House of Commons at dissolution.

* The party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

x - less than 0.005% of the popular vote

Results by province

Party name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL YK NW Total
  Progressive Conservative Seats:181716146750712421-208
 Vote (%):49.459.951.456.756.449.654.157.062.245.254.542.853.7
  Liberal Seats:----14253--5-148
 Vote (%):16.113.719.621.632.145.643.438.437.554.443.357.233.4
  Co-operative Commonwealth Seats:4-1-3-----  8
 Vote (%):24.54.428.419.610.52.31.84.50.30.2  9.5
  Liberal-Labour Seats:    1       1
 Vote (%):    0.5       0.2
Total Seats22171714857510124711265
Parties that won no seats:
Social Credit Vote (%):9.621.60.41.80.30.60.7     2.6
 IndependentVote (%):  xxxx0.10.6      0.2
 Independent LiberalVote (%):     0.6   0.2  0.2
Labor–Progressive Vote (%):0.40.30.10.40.10.1      0.1
  C. des électeurs Vote (%):     0.4      0.1
 Independent PCVote (%): 0.1  0.1       xx
Socialist Vote (%):    xxxx      xx
 Capitale familialeVote (%):     xx      xx
  Radical chrétien Vote (%):     xx      xx
 Independent SCVote (%): 0.1          xx
 Ouvrier canadienVote (%):     xx      xx
 Ind. ConservativeVote (%):          2.3 xx

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote

See also

Related Research Articles

John Diefenbaker 13th Prime minister of Canada (1957–1963)

John George Diefenbaker was the 13th prime minister of Canada, serving from 1957 to 1963. He was the only Progressive Conservative party leader between 1930 and 1979 to lead the party to an election victory, doing so three times, although only once with a majority of the seats in the House of Commons.

Progressive Conservative Party of Canada Canadian centre-right political party from 1942 to 2003

The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada was a centre-right federal political party in Canada that existed from 1942 to 2003.

1993 Canadian federal election 35th federal election in Canada

The 1993 Canadian federal election was held on October 25, 1993, to elect members to the House of Commons of the 35th Parliament of Canada. Considered to be a major political realignment, it was one of the most eventful elections in Canada's history. Two new regionalist parties emerged and the election marked the worst defeat for a governing party at the federal level. In a landslide, the Liberal Party, led by Jean Chrétien, won a majority government.

1988 Canadian federal election 34th Canadian federal election

The 1988 Canadian federal election was held on November 21, 1988, to elect members to the House of Commons of Canada of the 34th Parliament of Canada. It was an election largely fought on a single issue: the Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA); the Progressive Conservative Party campaigned in favour of it whereas the Liberal Party and the New Democratic Party (NDP) campaigned against it.

1972 Canadian federal election 29th Canadian federal election

The 1972 Canadian federal election was held on October 30, 1972, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 29th Parliament of Canada. It resulted in a slim victory for the governing Liberal Party, which won 109 seats, compared to 107 seats for the opposition Progressive Conservatives. A further 48 seats were won by other parties and independents. On election night, the results appeared to give 109 seats to the Tories, but once the counting had finished the next day, the final results gave the Liberals a minority government and left the New Democratic Party led by David Lewis holding the balance of power. See 29th Canadian parliament for a full list of MPs elected.

1984 Canadian federal election 33rd Canadian federal election

The 1984 Canadian federal election was held on September 4, 1984, to elect members to the House of Commons of the 33rd Parliament of Canada.

Unite the Right (Canada) Mid-1990s to 2003 Canadian movement to unite right-of-center parties

The Unite the Right movement was a successful Canadian political movement which existed from around the mid-1990s to 2003. The movement came into being when it became clear that neither of Canada's two main right-of-centre political parties, the Reform Party of Canada/Canadian Alliance (CA) and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC), was independently capable of defeating the governing Liberal Party. The objective of the movement, therefore, was to merge the two parties into a single party. The goal of uniting the right was accomplished in December 2003 with the formation of the Conservative Party of Canada.

The Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta was a provincial centre-right party in the Canadian province of Alberta. The party formed the provincial government, without interruption, from 1971 until the party's defeat in the 2015 provincial election under Premiers Peter Lougheed, Don Getty, Ralph Klein, Ed Stelmach, Alison Redford, Dave Hancock and Jim Prentice. At 44 years, this was the longest unbroken run in government at the provincial or federal level in Canadian history.

Social Credit Party of Canada Political party in Canada

The Social Credit Party of Canada, colloquially known as the Socreds, was a populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. It was the federal wing of the Canadian social credit movement.

1957 Canadian federal election 23rd Canadian federal election

The 1957 Canadian federal election was held June 10, 1957, to select the 265 members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 23rd Parliament of Canada. In one of the greatest upsets in Canadian political history, the Progressive Conservative Party, led by John Diefenbaker, brought an end to 22 years of Liberal rule, as the Tories were able to form a minority government despite losing the popular vote to the Liberals.

1968 Canadian federal election 28th Canadian federal election

The 1968 Canadian federal election was held on June 25, 1968, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 28th Parliament of Canada.

1980 Canadian federal election 32nd Canadian federal election

The 1980 Canadian federal election was held on February 18, 1980, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 32nd Parliament of Canada. It was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Prime Minister Joe Clark was defeated in the Commons.

1945 Canadian federal election 20th Canadian federal election

The 1945 Canadian federal election was held June 11, 1945, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 20th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal government was re-elected to its third consecutive government, although this time with a minority government as the Liberals fell five seats short of a majority.

1979 Canadian federal election 31st Canadian federal election

The 1979 Canadian federal election was held on May 22, 1979, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 31st Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the defeat of the Liberal Party of Canada after 11 years in power under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Joe Clark led the Progressive Conservative Party to power but with only a minority of seats in the House of Commons. The Liberals, however, beat the Progressive Conservatives in the overall popular vote by more than 400,000 votes. Taking office on the eve of his 40th birthday, Clark became the youngest prime minister in Canadian history.

1974 Canadian federal election 30th Canadian federal election

The 1974 Canadian federal election was held on July 8, 1974, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 30th Parliament of Canada. The governing Liberal Party was reelected, going from a minority to a majority government, and gave Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau his third term. The Progressive Conservatives, led by Robert Stanfield, did well in the Atlantic provinces, and in the West, but the Liberal support in Ontario and Quebec ensured a majority Liberal government.

Federal minority governments in Canada Canadian political history

During the history of Canadian politics, thirteen minority governments have been elected at the federal level. There have also been two minority governments resulting from governments being replaced between elections, for a total of fifteen federal minority governments in thirteen separate minority parliaments. There have been historical cases where the governing party had fewer than half of the seats but had the support of independents who called themselves members of the party; these cases are not included, as there was never any serious chance of the government falling.

1962 Canadian federal election 25th Canadian federal election

The 1962 Canadian federal election was held on June 18, 1962, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 25th Parliament of Canada. The governing Progressive Conservative (PC) Party won a plurality of seats in this election, and its majority government was reduced to a minority government.

1963 Canadian federal election 26th Canadian federal election

The 1963 Canadian federal election was held on April 8, 1963 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 26th Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the defeat of the minority Progressive Conservative (Tory) government of Prime Minister John Diefenbaker, with the Liberals returning to power for the first time in 6 years, where they would remain for twenty of the next twenty-one years. For the Social Credit Party, despite getting their highest ever share of the vote, the party lost 6 seats compared to its high-water mark in 1962.

1965 Canadian federal election 27th Canadian federal election

The 1965 Canadian federal election was held on November 8, 1965 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 27th Parliament of Canada. The Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the House. Although the Liberals lost a small share of the popular vote, they were able to win more seats, falling just short of a majority.

1935 Canadian federal election 18th Canadian federal election

The 1935 Canadian federal election was held on October 14, 1935, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 18th Parliament of Canada. The Liberal Party of William Lyon Mackenzie King won a majority government, defeating Prime Minister R. B. Bennett's Conservatives.

References

  1. Pomfret, R. "Voter Turnout at Federal Elections and Referendums". Elections Canada. Elections Canada. Retrieved 23 February 2014.

Further reading