1874 Canadian federal election

Last updated
1874 Canadian federal election
Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg
  1872 January 22, 1874 1878  

206 seats in the House of Commons
104 seats needed for a majority
Turnout69.6% [1] (Decrease2.svg0.7pp)
 First partySecond party
  Alexander Mackenzie portrait.jpg JaMAC 140x190.jpg
Leader Alexander Mackenzie John A. Macdonald
Party Liberal Conservative
Leader sinceMarch 6, 1873July 1, 1867
Leader's seat Lambton Kingston
Last election95 seats, 34.7%100 seats, 38.7%
Seats won12965
Seat changeIncrease2.svg34Decrease2.svg35
Popular vote128,45597,925
Percentage39.5%30.1%
SwingIncrease2.svg4.8%Decrease2.svg8.6%

Prime Minister before election

Alexander Mackenzie
Liberal

Prime Minister after election

Alexander Mackenzie
Liberal

The 1874 Canadian federal election was held on January 22, 1874, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 3rd Parliament of Canada. Sir John A. Macdonald, who had recently been forced out of office as prime minister, and his Conservatives were defeated by the Liberal Party under their new leader Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie.

House of Commons of Canada Lower house of the Canadian Parliament

The House of Commons of Canada is the lower chamber of the bicameral Parliament of Canada, along with the sovereign and the Senate of Canada. The House of Commons currently meets in a temporary Commons chamber in the West Block of the parliament buildings on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, while the Centre Block, which houses the traditional Commons chamber, undergoes a ten-year renovation.

3rd Canadian Parliament

The 3rd Canadian Parliament was in session from March 26, 1874, until August 17, 1878. The membership was set by the 1874 federal election on January 22, 1874. It was dissolved prior to the 1878 election.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Contents

Macdonald's government had been forced to resign on November 5, 1873, because of allegations of corruption relating to the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (see the Pacific Scandal). The Liberals under Mackenzie formed a government two days later with an election called for January. The Tories were unable to recover from the scandal and lost the election as a result.

Canadian Pacific Railway Major class 1 railroad operating in Canada and the U.S.

The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), also known formerly as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, and known as simply Canadian Pacific is a historic Canadian Class I railroad incorporated in 1881. The railroad is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited, which began operations as legal owner in a corporate restructuring in 2001.

The Pacific Scandal was a political scandal in Canada involving bribes being accepted by 150 members of the Conservative government in the attempts of private interests to influence the bidding for a national rail contract. As part of British Columbia's 1871 agreement to join the Canadian Confederation, the government had agreed to build a transcontinental railway linking the Pacific Province to the eastern provinces.

The election was the first to occur following Prince Edward Island's entry into Confederation, and the first to use secret ballots in Canada.

Prince Edward Island Province of Canada

Prince Edward Island is a province of Canada and one of the three Maritime Provinces. It is the smallest province of Canada in both land area and population, but it is the most densely populated. Part of the traditional lands of the Mi'kmaq, it became a British colony in the 1700s and was federated into Canada as a province in 1873. Its capital is Charlottetown. According to Statistics Canada, the province of PEI has 155,318 residents.

Secret ballot voting style that makes each vote anonymous

The secret ballot, also known as Australian ballot, is a voting method in which a voter's choices in an election or a referendum are anonymous, forestalling attempts to influence the voter by intimidation, blackmailing, and potential vote buying. The system is one means of achieving the goal of political privacy.

National results

The Canadian parliament after the 1874 election Chambre des Communes 1874.png
The Canadian parliament after the 1874 election
1874 Canadian electoral map Canada 1874 Federal Election.svg
1874 Canadian electoral map
1296512
LiberalConservativeO
3rd Parliament
PartyParty leader# of candidatesSeatsPopular vote
1872 ElectedChange#%Change
  Liberal Alexander Mackenzie 14095129+35.8%128,45539.49%+4.77pp
  Conservative John A. Macdonald 656339-38.1%57,69117.74%-8.02pp
  Liberal-Conservative 1383626-27.8%40,23412.37%-0.53pp
  Conservative Labour  11--100%1,5150.47%+0.02pp
 Independents714+300%10,4533.21%+1.58pp
 Independent Liberal525+300%6,5412.01%+0.37pp
 Independent Conservative323+50%2,3600.73%+0.03pp
 Unknown104-   --78,00823.98%+1.78pp
Total355200206+3.0%325,247100% 
Source: Parliamentary website, Detailed riding results

Notes:

1 Liberal-Conservatives sat with the Conservative caucus in the House of Commons.

Acclamations

The following Members of Parliament were elected by acclamation;

Results by province

Party name  BC   MB   ON   QU   NB   NS   PEI  Total
  Liberal Seats31613410155129
 Popular vote34.147.039.634.847.138.156.839.5
  Conservative Seats11151722139
 Vote4.513.819.517.66.817.817.517.7
  Liberal-Conservative Seats1 101212-26
 Vote16.9 10.414.98.619.215.412.4
  Conservative Labour Seats  -    -
 Vote  0.9    0.5
 UnknownSeats        
 Vote29.213.827.227.519.99.010.324.0
 IndependentSeats 1--21 4
 Vote 9.50.82.317.67.7 3.2
 Independent LiberalSeats1 2 11 5
 Vote15.4 1.7  8.2 2.0
 Independent ConservativeSeats 1 2   3
 Vote 15.9 2.9   0.7
Total seats64886516216206

Vote and seat summaries

Popular vote
Liberal
39.49%
Conservative
30.11%
Others
30.40%
Seat totals
Liberal
62.62%
Conservative
31.55%
Others
5.83%

See also

Related Research Articles

Mackenzie Bowell 5th Prime Minister of Canada

Sir Mackenzie Bowell was a Canadian newspaper publisher and politician, who served as the fifth prime minister of Canada, in office from 1894 to 1896.

1874 in Canada Canada-related events during the year of 1874

Events from the year 1874 in Canada.

1867 Canadian federal election

The 1867 Canadian federal election was held from August 7 to September 20, 1867, and was the first election for the new nation of Canada. It was held to elect members representing electoral districts in the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec to the House of Commons of the 1st Canadian Parliament. The provinces of Manitoba (1870) and British Columbia (1871) were created during the term of the 1st Parliament of Canada and were not part of this election.

1896 Canadian federal election

The 1896 Canadian federal election was held on June 23, 1896, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 8th Parliament of Canada. Though the Conservative Party won a plurality of the popular vote, the Liberal Party, led by Wilfrid Laurier, won the majority of seats to form the next government.

1872 Canadian federal election

The 1872 Canadian federal election was held from July 20 to October 12, 1872, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 2nd Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald's Conservative Party remained in power, defeating the Liberals. However, the Liberals increased their parliamentary representation considerably, while the Conservative seat count remained static, giving them only five more seats than the Liberals. This technically resulted in the country's first minority government, though the support of two independent Conservative MPs functionally gave Macdonald an extremely slim majority.

1891 Canadian federal election

The 1891 Canadian federal election was held on March 5 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 7th Parliament of Canada. It was won by the Conservative Party of Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald.

1925 Canadian federal election

The 1925 Canadian federal election was held on October 29 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 15th Parliament of Canada. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal Party formed a minority government. This precipitated the "King–Byng Affair".

Joseph-Aldric Ouimet, was a Canadian parliamentarian.

1926 Canadian federal election

The 1926 Canadian federal election was held on September 14 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 16th Parliament of Canada. The election was called following an event known as the King–Byng affair. In the 1925 federal election, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King's Liberal Party of Canada won fewer seats in the House of Commons of Canada than the Conservatives of Arthur Meighen. Mackenzie King, however, was determined to continue to govern with the support of the Progressive Party. The combined Liberal and Progressive caucuses gave Mackenzie King a plurality of seats in the House of Commons, and the ability to form a minority government. The agreement collapsed, however, following a scandal, and Mackenzie King approached the Governor-General, Baron Byng of Vimy, to seek dissolution of the Parliament. Byng refused on the basis that the Conservatives had won the largest number of seats in the prior election, and called upon Meighen to form a government.

1878 Canadian federal election

The 1878 Canadian federal election was held on September 17 to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 4th Parliament of Canada. It resulted in the end of Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie's Liberal government after only one term in office. Canada suffered an economic depression during Mackenzie's term, and his party was punished by the voters for it. The Liberals' policy of free trade also hurt their support with the business establishment in Toronto and Montreal.

1882 Canadian federal election

The 1882 Canadian federal election was held on June 20, 1882, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 5th Parliament of Canada.

1887 Canadian federal election

The 1887 Canadian federal election was held on February 22, 1887, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 6th Parliament of Canada.

2nd Canadian Parliament

The 2nd Canadian Parliament was in session from March 5, 1873, until January 2, 1874. The membership was set by the 1872 federal election from July 20 to October 12, 1872, and it changed only somewhat due to resignations and by-elections until it was dissolved prior to the 1874 election.

Charles M. McDonald was a Canadian politician who served in the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan and in the Parliament of Canada. He has the distinction of having served in both the House of Commons of Canada and the Senate of Canada for less than a year.

Electoral history of John A. Macdonald

This article is the Electoral history of Sir John A. Macdonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada.

Electoral history of Alexander Mackenzie

This article is the Electoral history of Alexander Mackenzie, the second Prime Minister of Canada. A Liberal, he served one term as Prime Minister. He became Prime Minister after defeating the government of Sir John A. Macdonald on a non-confidence motion in 1873 and then winning the general election of 1874. He later lost the general election of 1878 and Macdonald returned to power.

Electoral history of Mackenzie Bowell

This article is the Electoral history of Sir Mackenzie Bowell, the fifth Prime Minister of Canada. A Conservative, he became prime minister upon the sudden death in office of Prime Minister Sir John Thompson in 1894. Bowell served a short term of just over one year as prime minister (1894-1896), until he was forced to resign over the Manitoba Schools Question. He never led his party in a general election. When he died in 1917, he was one of the last surviving members of the first House of Commons of Canada elected in 1867.

Electoral history of Charles Tupper

This article is the Electoral history of Sir Charles Tupper, the sixthth Prime Minister of Canada. A Conservative, he became prime minister upon the resignation of Prime Minister Sir Mackenzie Bowell over the Manitoba Schools Question in 1896. Tupper was the shortest-serving prime minister, with a term of only 68 days. He led his party in two general elections and lost both, to Sir Wilfrid Laurier

Electoral history of William Lyon Mackenzie King

This article is the Electoral history of William Lyon Mackenzie King, the tenth Prime Minister of Canada. A Liberal, he was Canada's longest-serving Prime Minister, with three separate terms as Prime Minister, for a total of 21 years and 154 days. He defeated Prime Ministers Arthur Meighen and R.B. Bennett at different times, and was succeeded by Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent in 1948.

References

  1. "Voter Turnout at Federal Elections and Referendums". Elections Canada. Retrieved 10 March 2019.