Chevrolet Standard Six

Last updated
Chevrolet Standard Six
1934 Chevrolet Standard DC Coach.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Chevrolet (General Motors)
Also calledChevrolet Mercury (1933 only)
Production1933 (Mercury)
1934–1936 (Standard)
Assembly
Body and chassis
Body style
Layout FR layout
Platform GM A platform
Related Chevrolet Master
Pontiac Six
Powertrain
Engine 181 cu in (3.0 L) OHV I6
206.8 cu in (3.4 L) OHV I6
Transmission 3-speed manual [1]
Dimensions
Wheelbase 107.0 in (2,718 mm)
109.0 in (2,769 mm)(1936) [2]
Chronology
Predecessor Chevrolet Series BA Confederate
Successor Chevrolet Master

The Chevrolet Standard (Series DC) was launched in 1933, initially as the Chevrolet Standard Mercury, by Chevrolet as a lower priced alternative to the 1932 Chevrolet Series BA Confederate that became the Master Eagle in 1933 [3] and Master from 1934. [4] It was advertised as the cheapest six-cylinder enclosed car on the market. [5]

The Standard was offered in three body styles all on a 107-inch wheelbase: 2-door sedan (a body style Chevrolet customarily referred to as a "coach" in marketing at the time), coupe and coupe with rumble seat. All bodies were by Fisher and featured 'no-draft ventilation'. All models were powered by a 181 cu in (2,970 cc) six-cylinder valve-in-head engine producing 60 bhp (45 kW; 61 PS) at 3,000 rpm and 125 lb⋅ft (169 N⋅m) of torque [6] giving the car a top speed of between 65–70 mph. This engine had first appeared in Chevrolet's 1929 models, introduced in 1928. The car had full instrumentation. [7] A clock, heater and a radio were options. [1] For 1934, sedan, roadster and touring body styles were added to the catalog.

In 1935, a larger 206.8 cu in (3,389 cc) six-cylinder engine was offered in lieu of the 181 cu in (2,970 cc), producing 74 bhp (55 kW; 75 PS) at 3,200 rpm and 150 lb⋅ft (203 N⋅m) of torque. A sedan delivery was also available this year.

For 1936, the Standard Six received a wide range of improvements and a wider choice of body styles including cabriolet and sports sedan versions. It was built on a new box-girder frame with a wheel base of 109 inches. [8] With an increase of compression ratio from 5.6:1 to 6:1, the standard 206.8 cu in (3,389 cc) engine now produced 79 bhp (59 kW; 80 PS) at 3,200 rpm and 156 lb⋅ft (212 N⋅m) of torque which was now shared with the Master Six. [9] The spare wheel moved from its external rear trunk location to a new compartment under the trunk. Brakes were 11-in drums. [2] The steel roof was new. [10]

The Standard Six was discontinued for 1937 when the Master range was joined by the new Master Deluxe. [11] In May of 1925 the Chevrolet Export Boxing plant at Bloomfield, New Jersey was repurposed from a previous owner where Knock-down kits for Chevrolet, Oakland, Oldsmobile, Buick and Cadillac passenger cars, and both Chevrolet and G. M. C. truck parts are crated and shipped by railroad to the docks at Weehawken, New Jersey for overseas GM assembly factories. [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

Chevrolet Bel Air American full-size automobile

The Chevrolet Bel Air was a full-size car produced by Chevrolet for the 1950–1975 model years. Initially, only the two-door hardtops in the Chevrolet model range were designated with the Bel Air name from 1950 to 1952. With the 1953 model year, the Bel Air name was changed from a designation for a unique body shape to a premium level of trim applied across a number of body styles. The Bel Air continued with various other trim level designations, and it went from a mid-level trim car to a budget fleet sedan when U.S. production ceased in 1975. Production continued in Canada, for its home market only, through the 1981 model year.

Oldsmobile Cutlass American car model

The Oldsmobile Cutlass was a range of automobiles produced by General Motors' Oldsmobile division between 1961 and 1999. At its introduction, the Cutlass was Oldsmobile's entry-level model; it began as a unibody compact car, but saw its greatest success as a body-on-frame intermediate. The Cutlass was named after the type of sword, which was common during the Age of Sail.

Pontiac Tempest Automobile manufactured by Pontiac

The Pontiac Tempest is an automobile that was produced by Pontiac from 1960 to 1970, and again from 1987 to 1991.

Buick Century Line of upscale performance cars

Buick Century is the model name that was used by Buick for a line of upscale full-size cars from 1936 to 1942 and 1954 to 1958, as well as from 1973 to 2005 for mid-size cars.

Buick Regal Mid-sized car model

The Buick Regal is an upscale mid-sized car that was first introduced by Buick for the 1973 model year. The model was originally positioned as a personal luxury car, and typically offered in both coupe and sedan forms until 1997, when the Regal became sedan-only due to the decline of the personal luxury coupe market. For certain model years between 1973 and 2004, the Regal shared bodies and powertrains with the similar Buick Century, although the Regal was positioned as a more upmarket vehicle.

General Motors LS-based small-block engine V8 automobile engine made by General Motors

The LS based small-block engine is the primary V-8 used in General Motors' line of rear-wheel-drive cars and trucks. Introduced in January 1995, it is a "clean sheet" design with only rod bearings, lifters, and bore spacing in common with the longstanding Chevrolet small-block V-8 that preceded it as the basis for GM small-block V-8s. The basic LS variations use cast iron blocks, while performance editions are all aluminum with cast iron cylinder liners. The engine block and cylinder heads are cast at Saginaw Metal Casting Operations in Saginaw, Michigan.

Oldsmobile Starfire Motor vehicle

The Oldsmobile Starfire is an automobile nameplate used by Oldsmobile, produced in three non-contiguous generations beginning in 1954. The Starfire nameplate made its debut with the 1954–1956 Ninety-Eight series convertibles. For 1957 only, all Ninety-Eight series models were named "Starfire 98".

Cadillac V8 engine Motor vehicle engine

The term Cadillac V8 may refer to any of a number of V8 engines produced by the Cadillac Division of General Motors since it pioneered the first such mass-produced engine in 1914.

Buick Roadmaster Automobile

The Buick Roadmaster is an automobile that was built by Buick from 1936 to 1958, and again from 1991 to 1996. Roadmasters produced between 1936 and 1958 were built on Buick's longest non-limousine wheelbase and shared their basic structure with entry-level Cadillac and, after 1940, senior Oldsmobiles. Between 1946 and 1957 the Roadmaster served as Buick's flagship.

Pontiac Grand Am Motor vehicle

The Pontiac Grand Am is a mid-size car and later a compact car that was produced by Pontiac. The Grand Am had two separate three-year runs in the 1970s: from 1973 to 1975, and again from 1978 to 1980. It was based on the GM A platform. Production of the Grand Am was canceled in 1980 when it was replaced by the Pontiac 6000. The Grand Am was reintroduced in 1985 when it replaced the Pontiac Phoenix. It became Pontiac's best selling car and was later replaced by the Pontiac G6, so named as it was intended to be the 6th generation of the Grand Am.

Oldsmobile straight-6 engine

Oldsmobile produced a straight-6 automobile engine from 1923 to 1950. It was a conventional side-valve engine of varying capacities and at stages was shared with GMC.

Chevrolet Delray Motor vehicle

The Chevrolet Delray, named after the Delray neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan, debuted in 1954 as an optional trim level on two-door models of Chevrolet's mid-range 210 series of cars. In 1958, it became a distinct series of its own at the bottom of Chevy's lineup, and added a four-door sedan, and sedan delivery, but it only remained in production for that model year.

Buick Limited Line of upscale cars

The Limited was Buick's flagship limousine between 1936 and 1942 and, during model year 1958 during GM's Fiftieth Anniversary, the halo car for Buick. After the vehicle was retired in 1959, Buick has intermittently used the "Limited" name for several decades to denote those models which featured a high level of trim and standard options in its various model ranges. Vehicles given the Limited nameplate were in direct competition with Cadillac senior sedans for clientele who wanted a GM luxury sedan but regarded Cadillac as "ostentatious" or "flamboyant" as Buick had over time earned a reputation of low-key conservative appearance while focusing on durability and reliability. The Limited nameplate returned in the mid-1960s denoting the top trim package on Buick vehicles for several decades thereafter.

Pontiac Chieftain Motor vehicle

The Pontiac Chieftain is an automobile which was produced by Pontiac from 1949 to 1958. The 1949 Chieftain and Streamliner models were the first all new car designs to come from Pontiac in the post World War II years. Previous cars had been 1942 models with minor revisions.

The Chevrolet Kingswood was a 4-door station wagon produced by Chevrolet in 1959 and 1960, and again from 1969 to 1972 built on the GM B Body platform.

Chevrolet Yeoman Station wagon produced by Chevrolet for the 1958 model year

The Chevrolet Yeoman was a station wagon produced by Chevrolet for the 1958 model year. The Yeoman was available in two models, a two-door and a four-door, both with six-passenger seating capacity. Based on the Delray passenger car series, the Yeoman represented the entry-level selections in the 1958 Chevrolet station wagon lineup, which also included the Brookwood and the Nomad.

Chevrolet Eagle Car model

The Chevrolet Master Eagle is an American vehicle manufactured by Chevrolet in 1933 to replace the 1932 Series BA Confederate. The Eagle was produced early in the 1933 production year. When it was joined by the cheaper Chevrolet Mercury later in 1933 the Eagle name was changed to Master to provide Chevrolet with a two-car range, and the first time in ten years they manufactured two models on different wheelbases. The Mercury was also known as the Standard series. Starting in 1929, GM introduced the short lived General Motors Companion Make Program where Oakland, Oldsmobile, Buick and Cadillac had "junior" models added to each division, but weren't labeled according to their "senior" brand. The only division that didn't get a "junior" brand was Chevrolet. Two different models were introduced as Chevrolet to determine which one the market liked better, and sold better.

Chevrolet Master American passenger vehicles

The Chevrolet Master and Master Deluxe are American passenger vehicles manufactured by Chevrolet between 1933 and 1942 to replace the 1933 Master Eagle. It was the more expensive model in the Chevrolet range at this time, with the Standard Mercury providing an affordable product between 1933 and 1937. Starting with this generation, all GM cars shared a corporate appearance as a result of the Art and Color Section headed by Harley Earl. From 1940 a more expensive version based on the Master Deluxe was launched called the Special Deluxe. This was the last Chevrolet that was exported to Japan in knock down kits and assembled at the company's factory in Osaka, Japan before the factory was appropriated by the Imperial Japanese Government. When Toyota decided to develop their own sedan called the Toyota AA, a locally manufactured Master was disassembled and examined to determine how Toyota should engineer their own cars. In May of 1925 the Chevrolet Export Boxing plant at Bloomfield, New Jersey was repurposed from a previous owner where Knock-down kits for Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick and Cadillac passenger cars, and both Chevrolet and G. M. C. truck parts are crated and shipped by railroad to the docks at Weehawken, New Jersey for overseas GM assembly factories.

Oldsmobile Six Car model

The Oldsmobile Six, also known as the Model 53, 54 and 55 (1913-1915) then a brief cancellation until it reappeared as the Model 37, 37A and 37B (1917-1921) was a top level sedan along with the Oldsmobile Series 40 junior vehicle produced by GM's Oldsmobile Division and was manufactured at Lansing Car Assembly in Lansing, Michigan. It replaced the Series 28 also known as the "Oldsmobile Autocrat" and was replaced by the Oldsmobile Model 30 in 1927, and shared wheelbases with the Buick Six.It continued to use the T-head engine for two years. The various bodystyles were supplied by Fisher Body of Detroit, MI. It competed with the Chevrolet Series C Classic Six as Chevrolet was an independent company before becoming a division in 1917. Oldsmobile also shared technology with GMC for commercial and industrial products.

Oldsmobile F-Series Car model

The Oldsmobile F-Series was built from the 1928 through 1938. The first generation continued the tradition of adding a series number for each model year; F-28, F-29, F-30 and F-31. The second generation, signified by a completely new bodystyle appearance was built from 1932 through 1938, all having been manufactured in Lansing, Michigan. 1926 saw the introduction of GM's most recognized business model, the use of common platforms shared amongst the brands. Oldsmobile and Buick shared the GM B platform. The F-Series was shared with the Buick Master Six and was also known as the Oldsmobile Six which was introduced as a name earlier in 1913. The F-Series was Oldsmobile's entry-level product using the Oldsmobile straight-6 engine, while the Oldsmobile L-Series, with a Oldsmobile Straight-8 engine, was the top level vehicle. It replaced the Oldsmobile Model 30 introduced in 1923, and was replaced by the Oldsmobile Series 60 and Oldsmobile Series 70 introduced in 1938. It was exported to Japan as a knock down kit and assembled at Osaka Assembly in Osaka, Japan

References

  1. 1 2 3 Kimes, Beverly R. (1996). Clark, Henry A. (ed.). The Standard Catalog of American Cars 1805-1945. Kraus Publications. pp. 283–302. ISBN   0873414780.
  2. 1 2 "Directory Index: Chevrolet/1936_Chevrolet/1936_Chevrolet_Brochure". Oldcarbrochures.com. Retrieved 2011-11-20.
  3. "1933 Chevrolet Eagle and Mercury". How Stuff Works. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  4. "GM Heritage Center 1933 information sheet" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-15. Retrieved 2011-11-20.
  5. The Tuscaloosa News - Mar 12, 1933 pg11
  6. "GM Heritage Center 1935 information sheet" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-15. Retrieved 2011-11-20.
  7. "1934 Chevy Owner's Manual". Chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com. Retrieved 2011-11-20.
  8. "GM Heritage Center 1936 information sheet" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-15. Retrieved 2011-11-20.
  9. the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide. "How Stuff Works". Auto.howstuffworks.com. Retrieved 2011-11-25.
  10. "Directory Index: Chevrolet/1936_Chevrolet/1936_Chevrolet_Brochure". Oldcarbrochures.com. Retrieved 2012-05-31.
  11. the Auto Editors of Consumer Guide (2007-09-19). "How Stuff Works". Auto.howstuffworks.com. Retrieved 2011-11-20.