Critical points of the elements (data page)

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Critical point

refTc(K)Tc(°C)Pc(MPa)Pc(other)Vc(cm³/mol)ρc(g/cm³)
1 H hydrogen
use32.97−240.181.293
CRC.a32.97−240.181.29365
KAL33.21.29765.0
SMI−239.913.2 kgf/cm²0.0310
1 H hydrogen (equilibrium)
LNG−240.171.29412.77 atm65.40.0308
1 H hydrogen (normal)
LNG−239.911.29712.8 atm65.00.0310
1 H hydrogen-2
KAL38.21.6560
1 H hydrogen-2 (equilibrium)
LNG−234.81.65016.28 atm60.40.0668
1 H hydrogen-2 (normal)
LNG−234.71.66516.43 atm60.30.0669
2 He helium
use5.19−267.960.227
CRC.a5.19−267.960.22757
KAL5.190.22757.2
SMI−267.92.34 kgf/cm²0.0693
2 He helium (equilibrium)
LNG−267.960.22892.261 atm0.06930
2 He helium-3
LNG−269.850.11821.13 atm72.50.0414
2 He helium-4
LNG−267.960.2272.24 atm57.30.0698
3 Li lithium
use(3223)(2950)(67)
CRC.b(3223)2950(67)(66)
7 N nitrogen
use126.21−146.943.39
CRC.a126.21−146.943.3990
KAL126.23.3989.5
SMI−147.134.7 kgf/cm²0.3110
7 N nitrogen-14
LNG−146.943.3933.5 atm89.50.313
7 N nitrogen-15
LNG−146.83.3933.5 atm90.40.332
8 O oxygen
use154.59−118.565.043
CRC.a154.59−118.565.04373
LNG−118.565.04349.77 atm73.40.436
KAL154.65.0473.4
SMI−118.851.4 kgf/cm²0.430
9 F fluorine
use144.13−129.025.172
CRC.a144.13−129.025.17266
LNG−129.05.21551.47 atm66.20.574
KAL144.35.2266
10 Ne neon
use44.4−228.72.76
CRC.a44.4−228.72.7642
LNG−228.712.7727.2 atm41.70.4835
KAL44.42.7641.7
SMI−228.726.8 kgf/cm²0.484
11 Na sodium
use(2573)(2300)(35)
CRC.b(2573)2300(35)(116)
15 P phosphorus
use994721
CRC.a994721
LNG721
16 S sulfur
use1314104120.7
CRC.a1314104120.7
LNG104111.7116 atm
KAL131420.7
SMI1040
17 Cl chlorine
use416.9143.87.991
CRC.a416.9143.87.991123
LNG143.87.7176.1 atm1240.573
KAL416.97.98124
SMI144.078.7 kgf/cm²0.573
18 Ar argon
use150.87−122.284.898
CRC.a150.87−122.284.89875
LNG−122.34.8748.1 atm74.60.536
KAL150.94.9074.6
SMI−12249.7 kgf/cm²0.531
19 K potassium
use(2223)(1950)(16)
CRC.b(2223)1950(16)(209)
33 As arsenic
use16731400
CRC.a1673140035
LNG1400
34 Se selenium
use1766149327.2
CRC.a1766149327.2
LNG1493
35 Br bromine
use58831510.34
CRC.a58831510.34127
LNG31510.3102 atm1351.184
KAL58810.3127
SMI3021.18
36 Kr krypton
use209.41−63.745.50
CRC.a209.41−63.745.5091
LNG−63.755.5054.3 atm91.20.9085
KAL209.45.5091.2
37 Rb rubidium
use(2093)(1820)(16)
CRC.b(2093)1820(16)(247)
LNG18322500.34
53 I iodine
use81954611.7
CRC.a819546155
LNG54611.7115 atm1550.164
KAL819155
SMI553
54 Xe xenon
use289.7716.625.841
CRC.c289.7716.625.841118
LNG16.5835.8457.64 atm1181.105
KAL289.75.84118
SMI16.660.2 kgf/cm²1.155
55 Cs caesium
use193816659.4
CRC.d193816659.4341
LNG18063000.44
80 Hg mercury
use17501477172.00
CRC.a17501477172.0043
LNG1477160.81587 atm
KAL175017242.7
SMI1460±201640±50 kgf/cm²0.5
86 Rn radon
use3771046.28
CRC.a3771046.28
LNG1046.2862 atm1391.6
KAL3776.3
SMI10464.1 kgf/cm²

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References

CRC.a-d

David R. Lide (ed), CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 85th Edition, online version. CRC Press. Boca Raton, Florida, 2003; Section 6, Fluid Properties; Critical Constants. Also agrees with Celsius values from Section 4: Properties of the Elements and Inorganic Compounds, Melting, Boiling, Triple, and Critical Point Temperatures of the Elements

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The CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics is a comprehensive one-volume reference resource for science research, currently in its 100th edition. It is sometimes nicknamed the "Rubber Bible" or the "Rubber Book", as CRC originally stood for "Chemical Rubber Company".

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Contents

Estimated accuracy for Tc and Pc is indicated by the number of digits. Above 750 K Tc values may be in error by 10 K or more. Vc values are not assumed accurate more than to a few percent. Parentheses indicate extrapolated values. From these sources:
  • (a) D. Ambrose, Vapor-Liquid Constants of Fluids, in R.M. Stevenson, S. Malanowski, Handbook of the Thermodynamics of Organic Compounds, Elsevier, New York, (1987).
  • (b) I.G. Dillon, P.A. Nelson, B.S. Swanson, J. Chem. Phys. 44, 4229, (1966).
  • (c) O. Sifner, J. Klomfar, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 23, 63, (1994).
  • (d) N.B. Vargaftik, Int. J. Thermophys. 11, 467, (1990).

LNG

J.A. Dean (ed), Lange's Handbook of Chemistry (15th Edition), McGraw-Hill, 1999; Section 6; Table 6.5 Critical Properties

KAL

National Physical Laboratory, Kaye and Laby Tables of Physical and Chemical Constants ; D. Ambrose, M.B. Ewing, M.L. McGlashan, Critical constants and second virial coefficients of gases (retrieved Dec 2005)

SMI

W.E. Forsythe (ed.), Smithsonian Physical Tables 9th ed., online version (1954; Knovel 2003). Table 259, Critical Temperatures, Pressures, and Densities of Gases

See also