Flight permit

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Flight permits are permits or permission required by an aircraft to overfly, land or make a technical stop in any country's airspace. All countries have their own regulations regarding the issuance of flight permits as there is generally a payment involved. The charges normally payable would be the Route Navigation Facility Charges or RNFC for overflights and also landing and parking charges in case of aircraft making halts. The procedure for issuance of these permits also varies from country to country. More details regarding these can be taken from the respective country's civil aviation authority websites.

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Most countries accept applications directly from the airlines and/or their agents appointed in the respective countries. The charges for the overflying and landing are normally billed to the operators or their agents by the respective national aviation authority responsible for maintaining and operating all the ground to air communications facilities in its region. [1]

Overflight permit map

A tool developed by a group of airlines in OPSGROUP shows the requirements for each country in the world.

The OPSGROUP World Permit Map indicates where permits are required.

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References

  1. "FAA Foreign Airspace restrictions".