Baggage cart

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Luggage carts in Ivory Coast Les transporteurs de bagages.jpg
Luggage carts in Ivory Coast
Baggage carts available for a deposit at a German train station Carts.jpg
Baggage carts available for a deposit at a German train station
Baggage cart mover Cart Mule.JPG
Baggage cart mover
A luggage cart in a hotel hallway LakeCityFLAug2008HollidayInnLuggageCart.jpg
A luggage cart in a hotel hallway

Baggage carts, luggage carts, luggage trolleys or trolleys are small vehicles pushed by travelers (human-powered) to carry individual luggage,[ citation needed ] mostly suitcases. There are two major sizes: One for big luggage and one for small luggage.[ clarification needed ] Carts have usually two parts for carrying luggage: A small section (basket) for carry on luggage at the same level as the handle, and a lowered large section for suitcases a small and large bags.[ citation needed ]

Contents

The baggage cart was invented by supermarket entrepreneur and inventor of the shopping cart Sylvan Goldman. [1]

The carts are provided in airports, large bus stations,[ citation needed ] hotels, or train stations for transporting luggage and may be free of charge. They are sometimes owned by the operator of the establishment. In some facilities carts may be provided by a contractor such as Smarte Carte for a rental fee. Baggage carts are usually built out of steel and equipped with three or four wheels. For safety reasons, they are generally fitted with a brake.[ citation needed ] Usually, a handle has to be pushed down in order to move the cart, however, in some cases, such as London airports, the handle activates the brake. Very few carts, e.g. in developing countries such as Sri Lanka, do not have this feature.[ citation needed ]

Where a charge is made, this can be either a deposit, which is returned automatically when the cart is returned; or a rental fee can be charged.

Parts

In airports, boarding baggage cart parts are: [2]

Baggage tugs

A baggage tug is a small tractor, sometimes an electric vehicle, used by the airline industry to tow baggage carts to and from the terminal/cargo facility and the aircraft. [3]

See also

Notes

  1. Shopping Carts: Carrying the Load Across U.S.
  2. "Baggage Tugs and Carts" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 25, 2014. Retrieved March 25, 2014.
  3. Baggage Tugs and Carts. Fundamentals Reference Guide Archived 2014-03-25 at the Wayback Machine .

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Baggage carts at Wikimedia Commons

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A cart or dray is a vehicle designed for transport, using two wheels and normally pulled by one or a pair of draught animals. A handcart is pulled or pushed by one or more people.

Shopping cart

A shopping cart or trolley, also known by a variety of other names, is a wheeled cart supplied by a shop or store, especially supermarkets, for use by customers inside the premises for transport of merchandise as they move around the premises, while shopping, prior to heading to the checkout counter, cashiers or tills. Increasing the amount of goods a shopper can collect increases the quantities they are likely to purchase in a single trip, boosting store profitability.

Winch

A winch is a mechanical device that is used to pull in or let out or otherwise adjust the tension of a rope or wire rope.

Suitcase

A suitcase is a form of luggage. It is often a somewhat flat, rectangular-shaped bag with rounded square corners, either metal, hard plastic or made of cloth, vinyl or leather that more or less retains its shape. Vinyl, leather or cloth suitcases may have a metal frame. It has a carrying handle on one side and is used mainly for transporting clothes, toiletries and other small possessions during trips. Hardshell suitcases open on hinges like a door. Suitcases may lock with keys or a combination.

Trackless train

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Lost luggage

Lost luggage is luggage conveyed by a public carrier such as an airline, seafaring cruise ship, shipping company, or railway which fails to arrive at the correct destination with the passenger. In the United States, an average of 1 in 150 people have their checked baggage misdirected or left behind each year.

Baggage reclaim

In airport terminals, a baggage reclaim area is an area where arriving passengers claim checked-in baggage after disembarking from an airline flight. The alternative term baggage claim is used at airports in the US and some other airports internationally. Similar systems are also used at train stations served by companies that offer checked bags, such as Amtrak in the United States.

Baggage

Baggage or luggage consists of bags, cases, and containers which hold a traveller's personal articles while the traveler is in transit. A modern traveller can be expected to have packages containing clothing, toiletries, small possessions, trip necessities. On the return trip, travelers may have souvenirs and gifts. For some people, luggage and the style thereof is representative of the owner's wealth and status. Luggage is constructed to protect the items during travel, either with a hard shell or a durable soft material. Luggage often has internal subdivisions or sections to aid in securing items. Handles are typically provided to facilitate carrying, and some luggage may have wheels and/or telescoping handles or leashes to make moving them easier.

Vermaport

Vermaport is a registered trademark brand of a shopping cart conveyor system built by Vermaport Limited of Nottingham, England. The Vermaport SC system is designed to transport shopping carts between floors of a retail establishment, the Vermaport LC system is a Luggage Cart System for Airports to help travellers navigate multi-levels at Airports and works in a similar way to the Vermaport SC. The Vermaport RS is a Luggage Return System to transport or store luggage carts at airports or other transportation hubs. The Vermaport systems are safer alternatives to inclined moving walkways, where a Vermaport system will take up about half as much space as a moving walkway.

Aircraft ground handling

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Sylvan Goldman

Sylvan Nathan Goldman was an American businessman and inventor of the shopping cart. His design had a pair of large wire baskets connected by tubular metal arms with four wheels.

Baggage handler

In the airline industry, a baggage handler is a person who loads and unloads baggage, and other cargo for transport via aircraft. With most airlines, the formal job title is "fleet service agent/clerk", though the position is commonly known amongst airline employees as a "ramp agent", due to the job's location on the airport ramp (tarmac).

Pintle

A pintle is a pin or bolt, usually inserted into a gudgeon, which is used as part of a pivot or hinge. Other applications include pintle and lunette ring for towing, and pintle pins securing casters in furniture.

Hand luggage

The term hand luggage or cabin baggage refers to the type of luggage that passengers are allowed to carry along in the passenger compartment of a vehicle instead of moving to the cargo compartment. Passengers are allowed to carry a limited number of smaller bags with them in the vehicle and contain valuables and items needed during the journey. There is normally storage space provided for hand luggage, either under seating, or in overhead lockers. Trains usually have luggage racks above the seats and may also have luggage space between the backs of seats facing opposite directions, or in extra luggage racks, for example, at the ends of the carriage near the doors.

In aviation, pushback is an airport procedure during which an aircraft is pushed backwards away from an airport gate by external power. Pushbacks are carried out by special, low-profile vehicles called pushback tractors or tugs.

Horse-drawn vehicle Vehicle pulled by horse; mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses

A horse-drawn vehicle is a mechanized piece of equipment pulled by one horse or by a team of horses. These vehicles typically had two or four wheels and were used to carry passengers and/or a load. They were once common worldwide, but they have mostly been replaced by automobiles and other forms of self-propelled transport.

Ground support equipment

Ground support equipment (GSE) is the support equipment found at an airport, usually on the apron, the servicing area by the terminal. This equipment is used to service the aircraft between flights. As the name suggests, ground support equipment is there to support the operations of aircraft whilst on the ground. The role of this equipment generally involves ground power operations, aircraft mobility, and cargo/passenger loading operations.

Towing

Towing is coupling two or more objects together so that they may be pulled by a designated power source or sources. The towing source may be a motorized land vehicle, vessel, animal, or human, and the load being anything that can be pulled. These may be joined by a chain, rope, bar, hitch, three-point, fifth wheel, coupling, drawbar, integrated platform, or other means of keeping the objects together while in motion.

Airport check-in

Airport check-in is the process whereby passengers are accepted by an airline at the airport prior to travel. The airlines typically use service counters found at airports. The check-in is normally handled by an airline itself or a handling agent working on behalf of an airline. Passengers usually hand over any baggage that they do not wish or are not allowed to carry in to the aircraft's cabin and receive a boarding pass before they can proceed to board their aircraft.