Middlesbrough (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Middlesbrough
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Middlesbrough2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Middlesbrough in the former county of Cleveland
EnglandCleveland.svg
Location of the former county of Cleveland within England
County North Yorkshire
Electorate 59,744 (2018) [1]
Current constituency
Created 1974 (1974)
Member of Parliament Andy McDonald (Labour)
Number of membersOne
Created from Middlesbrough East and Middlesbrough West
18681918
Number of membersOne
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced by Middlesbrough East and Middlesbrough West
Created from North Riding of Yorkshire

Middlesbrough is a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, [n 1] recreated in 1974, and represented since 2012 in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament by Andy McDonald from the Labour Party. [n 2] An earlier version of the seat existed between 1868 and 1918.

Contents

History

First creation

Parliament created this seat under the Representation of the People Act 1867 for the general election the next year, however the population expanded so was split into east/west areas in 1918. From 1950 until 1974, given intervening expansion of suburbs across the country, the Metropolitan Borough of Thornaby closer to Stockton on Tees was included in the Middlesbrough West constituency. Thornaby was enveloped into Teesside County Borough from 1974 and has not been part of the associated seats otherwise. [2]

Second creation – current

The seat was recreated on similar boundaries to those which existed immediately before 1918.

Results of the winning party

The 2015 result made the seat the 36-safest of Labour's 232 seats by percentage of majority. [3]

Since the constituency's re-creation in 1974, Middlesbrough has elected the Labour Party's candidate as its MP. [n 3] In areas formerly part of Middlesbrough East, the MP has been Labour since 1950. [n 4]

Middlesbrough West took in rural and semi-rural areas outside the borough to the west, and was a marginal seat passing three times between the two largest parties after the Second World War, but a Liberal stronghold from 1918 until 1945; former soldier and iron and steel merchant Trevelyan Thomson ran unopposed at the polls for re-election in 1924.

Opposition parties

The 2012 by-election and 2015 general election saw UKIP finish second. [4] The Liberal Democrats fielded second-placed candidates in 2005 and 2010. The Conservatives did in all elections between the seat's revival and 2001, and returned to second place in 2017. The Green Party outpolled the Liberal Democrats in 2015 in a field of five parties' candidates standing — the two parties failed to achieve 5% of votes cast leading them to forfeit their deposits.

Turnout

Turnout has ranged between 70.1% in 1987 and 48.8% in 2005.

Boundaries

Middlesbrough (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of current boundaries

1868–1885: The township of Linthorpe, and so much of the townships of Middlesbrough, Ormesby, and Eston as lie to the north of the road leading from Eston towards Yarm. [5]

1974–1983: The County Borough of Teesside wards of Berwick Hills, Marton, North Ormesby, St Hilda's, Thorntree, and Tollesby.

1983–1997: The Borough of Middlesbrough wards of Acklam, Beckfield, Beechwood, Berwick Hills, Gresham, Grove Hill, Kirby, Linthorpe, North Ormesby, Pallister, Park, St Hilda's, Southfield, Thorntree, and Westbourne.

1997–2010: The Borough of Middlesbrough wards of Acklam, Ayresome, Beckfield, Beechwood, Berwick Hills, Brookfield, Gresham, Grove Hill, Kader, Kirby, Linthorpe, North Ormesby, Pallister, Park, St Hilda's, Southfield, Thorntree, and Westbourne.

2010–present: The Borough of Middlesbrough wards of Acklam, Ayresome, Beckfield, Beechwood, Brookfield, Clairville, Gresham, Kader, Grove Hill, Linthorpe, Middlehaven, North Ormesby and Brambles Farm, Pallister Park, Thorntree, and University.

The boundaries of the constituency are loosely based on the pre-1968 County Borough of Middlesbrough boundaries, which is now defined as the Borough (or Town) of Middlesbrough; the exclusions are its Easterside and Park End Wards, instead in Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland.

Constituency profile

The constituency is mostly the urban city itself, largely in the sunset of its once world-leading steelmaking output. It suffers high unemployment and its adult population has mostly a low income; however, with modern advanced engineering, design and tourism, the city forms with nearby Redcar a bellwether for the North East region's economy firmly in the British forefront of a determined return to increasing national output. [6] In November 2012, male and female unemployment (based on the more up-to-date claimant statistics) placed Middlesbrough topmost of 29 constituencies in the region, well ahead for example the City of Durham at the bottom of the list, with just 3.4% claimants whereas this area had 9.4% claimants. [7]

In terms of housing stock, the authority is one of few authorities to see the proportion of detached and semi-detached homes increase (to 13.6% and 39.9%), in this instance this was coupled with a similar rise in flats to 11.9%, all at a loss to the share of terraced properties, down 4.7%. [8]

2010 general election

The film ToryBoy The Movie followed the election, directed by and starring John Walsh who documented how he became a candidate for the Conservative Party in Middlesbrough, challenging the sitting MP, Stuart Bell. [9] [10] In 2011, Neil Macfarlane, in a report for local newspaper Teesside Gazette , asked "Are Teessiders getting enough from Sir Stuart Bell?" when he failed to answer over one hundred telephone calls made to his constituency office over a three-month period. [11] The Gazette story was picked up by national newspapers. The Independent asked "is Sir Stuart Bell Britain's laziest MP?" [12] [13] The Guardian fact-checked the "laziest MP" claims and found that was false. [14] The Labour Party said it was looking into the allegations. [13] [15]

Members of Parliament

MPs 1868–1918

YearMember [16] Whip
1868 Henry Bolckow Liberal
1878 Isaac Wilson
1892 Havelock Wilson
1900 Samuel Sadler Conservative
1906 Havelock Wilson Liberal
1910 Penry Williams
1918 constituency abolished

MPs since 1974

ElectionMember [16] Party
Feb 1974 Arthur Bottomley Labour
1983 Stuart Bell
2012 by-election Andy McDonald

Elections

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Middlesbrough [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Andy McDonald 17,207 50.5 –15.2
Conservative Ruth Betson8,81225.8-0.9
Independent Antony High4,54813.3New
Brexit Party Faye Clements2,1686.4New
Liberal Democrats Thomas Crawford8162.4+1.4
Green Hugh Alberti5461.6+0.9
Majority8,39524.6–14.4
Turnout 34,09756.1–2.2
Labour hold Swing -7.2
General election 2017: Middlesbrough [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Andy McDonald 23,404 65.7 +8.9
Conservative Jacob Young 9,53126.7+10.2
UKIP David Hodgson1,4524.1-14.6
IndependentTerry Lawton6321.8New
Liberal Democrats Dawud Islam3681.0-2.7
Green Carl Martinez2500.7-3.6
Majority13,87339.0+0.9
Turnout 35,63758.3+5.4
Labour hold Swing −0.7
General election 2015: Middlesbrough [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Andy McDonald 18,584 56.8 +10.9
UKIP Nigel Baker6,10718.7+15.0
Conservative Simon Clarke 5,38816.5-2.3
Green Hannah Graham1,4074.3New
Liberal Democrats Richard Kilpatrick1,2203.7−16.2
Majority12,47738.1+12.1
Turnout 32,70652.9+1.5
Labour hold Swing −2.0
2012 Middlesbrough by-election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Andy McDonald 10,201 60.5 +14.6
UKIP Richard Elvin1,99011.8+8.1
Liberal Democrats George Selmer1,6729.9−10.0
Conservative Ben Houchen 1,0636.3−12.5
Peace Imdad Hussain1,0606.3New
BNP Peter Foreman3281.9−3.9
TUSC John Malcolm2771.6New
IndependentMark Heslehurst2751.6New
Majority8,21148.7+22.7
Turnout 16,866
Labour hold Swing
General election 2010: Middlesbrough [20] [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 15,351 45.9
Liberal Democrats Chris Foote-Wood 6,66219.9
Conservative John Walsh 6,28318.8
Independent Joan McTigue1,9695.9
BNP Michael Ferguson1,9545.8
UKIP Robert Parker1,2363.7
Majority8,68926.0
Turnout 33,45551.4
Labour win (new boundaries)

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Middlesbrough [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 18,562 57.8 −9.8
Liberal Democrats Joe Michna5,99518.7+8.3
Conservative Caroline Flynn-Macleod5,26316.4−2.7
BNP Ron Armes8192.5New
UKIP Michael Landers7682.4New
Independent Jackie Elder5031.6New
Independent Derrick Arnott2300.7New
Majority12,56739.1-9.4
Turnout 32,14048.8−1.0
Labour hold Swing −9.0
General election 2001: Middlesbrough [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 22,783 67.6 −3.9
Conservative Alex Finn6,45319.1+2.1
Liberal Democrats Keith Miller3,51210.4+1.9
Socialist Alliance Geoffrey Kerr-Morgan5771.7New
Socialist Labour Kai Andersen3921.2New
Majority16,33048.5-5.7
Turnout 33,71749.8−15.2
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Middlesbrough [24]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 32,925 71.4
Conservative Liam Benham7,90717.2
Liberal Democrats Alison Charlesworth3,9348.5
Referendum Robert Edwards1,3312.9
Majority25,01854.2
Turnout 46,09765.0
Labour win (new boundaries)
General election 1992: Middlesbrough [25] [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 26,343 64.1 +4.4
Conservative Paul R. Rayner10,55925.7+0.7
Liberal Democrats Rosamund Jordan4,20110.2−5.1
Majority15,78438.4+3.7
Turnout 41,10369.8−1.2
Labour hold Swing +1.9

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Middlesbrough [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 25,747 59.7 +9.0
Conservative Robert Orr-Ewing10,78925.0-2.6
Liberal Philip Hawley6,59415.3-5.9
Majority14,95834.7+11.6
Turnout 43,13071.0+4.6
Labour hold Swing
General election 1983: Middlesbrough [28]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Stuart Bell 21,220 50.7
Conservative L.H. Campey11,55127.6
Liberal A.D. Sanders8,87121.2
Workers Revolutionary M.A. Simpson2070.5
Majority9,66923.1
Turnout 41,84966.4
Labour win (new boundaries)

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: Middlesbrough
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Arthur Bottomley 24,872 56.2 -5.6
Conservative C Fenwick13,46330.4+6.0
Liberal Peter Freitag4,0239.1-4.7
Workers Revolutionary M Simpson1,0182.3New
Independent Labour J Wilcox8612.0New
Majority11,40925.8-11.6
Turnout 44,23767.9+6.7
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: Middlesbrough
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Arthur Bottomley 22,791 61.8 -4.5
Conservative Edward Leigh 8,98424.4-9.3
Liberal Chris Foote Wood 5,08013.8New
Majority13,80737.4+4.8
Turnout 36,85561.2-8.2
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: Middlesbrough
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Arthur Bottomley 27,324 66.3
Conservative Geoffrey Dickens 13,91533.7
Majority13,40932.6
Turnout 41,23969.4
Labour win (new seat)

Elections in the 1910s

General Election 1914–15:

A General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election December 1910: Middlesbrough [29] [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Penry Williams 10,313 61.1 +10.6
Conservative Thomas Gibson Poole6,56838.9+3.6
Majority3,74522.2+7.0
Turnout 16,88177.610.4
Registered electors 21,756
Liberal hold Swing +3.5
Walls Patrick Walls.png
Walls
General election January 1910: Middlesbrough [29] [30]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Penry Williams 9,670 50.5 -2.1
Conservative Arthur Charles Dorman6,75635.3-3.7
Labour Patrick Walls 2,71014.2New
Majority2,91415.2+1.6
Turnout 19,13688.0+1.3
Registered electors 21,756
Liberal hold Swing +0.8

Elections in the 1900s

Wilson Havelock Wilson.jpg
Wilson
General election 1906: Middlesbrough [29] [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Lib-Lab Havelock Wilson 9,271 52.6 +2.8
Conservative Samuel Sadler 6,86439.0-11.2
Independent Labour George Lansbury 1,4848.4New
Majority2,40713.6N/A
Turnout 17,61986.7+8.9
Registered electors 20,322
Lib-Lab gain from Conservative Swing +7.0
Sadler Samuel Sadler MP.jpg
Sadler
General election 1900: Middlesbrough [29] [31] [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Samuel Sadler 6,760 50.2 +9.0
Lib-Lab Havelock Wilson 6,70549.89.0
Majority550.4N/A
Turnout 13,46577.8+1.6
Registered electors 17,307
Conservative gain from Lib-Lab Swing +9.0

Elections in the 1890s

Wilson 1895 Havelock Wilson.jpg
Wilson
General election 1895: Middlesbrough [29] [31] [32]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Lib-Lab Havelock Wilson 6,755 58.8 +25.2
Conservative Samuel Sadler 4,73541.2+13.6
Majority2,02017.6N/A
Turnout 11,49076.2-3.4
Registered electors 15,077
Lib-Lab gain from Independent Labour Swing N/A
Robson 1895 William Robson.jpg
Robson
General election 1892: Middlesbrough [29] [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Independent Labour Havelock Wilson 4,691 38.8 New
Liberal William Robson 4,06233.6N/A
Liberal Unionist Hugh Bell 3,33327.6New
Majority6295.2N/A
Turnout 12,08679.6N/A
Registered electors 15,192
Independent Labour gain from Liberal Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Middlesbrough [29] [31]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Wilson Unopposed
Liberal hold
Dixon Sir Raylton Dixon00.jpg
Dixon
General election 1885: Middlesbrough [29] [31] [33]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Wilson 6,961 63.3 +1.6
Conservative Raylton Dixon 4,03536.7+14.5
Majority2,92626.6−12.9
Turnout 10,99679.3+10.6
Registered electors 13,864
Liberal hold Swing -6.5
General election 1880: Middlesbrough [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Wilson 4,515 61.7 +2.3
Conservative Samuel Sadler 1,62622.2+6.3
Lib-Lab Edward Dillon Lewis [35] 1,17116.08.6
Majority2,88939.5+4.7
Turnout 7,31268.7-1.9
Registered electors 10,641
Liberal hold Swing +2.4

Elections in the 1870s

By-election 5 July 1878: Middlesbrough [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Isaac Wilson 5,307 68.7 +9.3
Conservative Samuel Sadler 2,41531.3+6.7
Majority2,89237.4+2.6
Turnout 7,72265.3-5.3
Registered electors 11,824
Liberal hold Swing +1.4
General election 1874: Middlesbrough [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Henry Bolckow 3,719 59.4 N/A
Lib-Lab John Kane 1,54124.6New
Conservative William Randolph Innes Hopkins [36] 99615.9New
Majority2,17834.8N/A
Turnout 6,25670.6N/A
Registered electors 8,862
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: Middlesbrough [34]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Henry Bolckow Unopposed
Registered electors 5,196
Liberal win (new seat)

See also

Notes

  1. A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. Middlesbrough was revived for the February 1974 general election
  4. Middlesbrough East contributed more than half of its former area to the modern boundaries (as variously drawn after 1974)

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