Mutoh Europe nv

Last updated
Mutoh Europe nv
Type Business unit
IndustryElectronics
FoundedAugust 1990
Headquarters
Key people
Mitsuo Takatsu, Managing Director
ProductsPrinters, plotters
Number of employees
45 (As of November, 2011)
Website Mutoh Europe nv

Mutoh Europe nv is a business unit of Mutoh Holdings Co. Ltd.

Contents

Corporate message

“wide format printers for productive people”

Business Summary

Mutoh Europe Company Background

Mutoh Europe Products

Mutoh Europe nv are a fully owned subsidiary of Mutoh Industries Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan (TYO: 7999 “MUTOH”). Founded in 1991, the company’s activities encompass sales, sales support, warehousing and logistics, marketing, product and application support, service training and after-sales service of Mutoh hardware (professional sign cutting plotters and small size desktop & large-format full-colour piezo printers for commercial inkjet printing, sign & display, specialty/industrial, digital transfer & direct textile applications).

Mutoh products are distributed via a wide network of certified Mutoh distributors in the EMEA territory through Mutoh Europe, Mutoh Deutschland and Mutoh North Europe.

Mutoh’s desktop and Large-format printer printers & sign cutting plotters for Sign & Display, Specialty / Industrial, Indoor & Digital Transfer and Direct Textile applications encompass Eco Solvent / UMS printers (XpertJet 1641SR, XpertJet 1682SR, ValueJet 628, ValueJet 1324X, ValueJet 1604X & ValueJet 2638X), LED UV printers (XpertJet 461UF, XpertJet 661UF, ValueJet 626UF, ValueJet 1638UR Mark II, ValueJet 1626UH, ValueJet 1638UH Mark II & PerformanceJet 2508UF), MP31 printer (ValueJet 1627MH), direct textile printers (ValueJet 1938TX), Indoor & dye sublimation printers (DrafStation RJ-900XG & ValueJet 1604WX/1938WX/1948WX/2638X Dye Sub printers) and sign cutting plotters (ValueCut 600, ValcueCut II family, Lite 140, Advanced 160 & Premium 160).


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