Nottingham South (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Nottingham South
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
NottinghamSouth2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of Nottingham South in Nottinghamshire
EnglandNottinghamshire.svg
Location of Nottinghamshire within England
County Nottinghamshire
Electorate 69,154 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Nottingham, Clifton, Wollaton
Current constituency
Created 1983
Member of Parliament Lilian Greenwood (Labour)
Number of membersOne
Created from Nottingham East and Nottingham West
18851974 (1974)
Number of membersOne
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Replaced by Nottingham East,
Nottingham West,
Rushcliffe
Created from Nottingham

Nottingham South is a constituency of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, represented since 2010 by Lilian Greenwood of the Labour Party. [n 1] [n 2]

Contents

Members of Parliament

Since 2010, the seat has been represented by Lilian Greenwood, who succeeded Labour's Alan Simpson on his retirement. Simpson had held the seat since 1992, when he unseated the Conservative Martin Brandon-Bravo.

MPs 1885–1974

ElectionMember [2] Party
1885 John Williams Liberal
1886 Henry Smith Wright Conservative
1895 Lord Henry Cavendish-Bentinck Conservative
1906 Arthur Richardson Liberal-Labour
January 1910 Lord Henry Cavendish-Bentinck Conservative
1929 Holford Knight Labour
1931 National Labour
1935 Frank Markham National Labour
1945 Norman Smith Labour Co-operative
1955 Denis Keegan Conservative
1959 William Clark Conservative
1966 George Perry Labour
1970 Norman Fowler Conservative
February 1974 constituency abolished

MPs since 1983

ElectionMember [2] Party
1983 Martin Brandon-Bravo Conservative
1992 Alan Simpson Labour
2010 Lilian Greenwood Labour

Constituency profile

The seat is the most economically diverse of the three Nottingham constituencies covering higher income and lower income output areas (sub-divisions of wards). [3] In 2010 it was the most marginal of the seats, changing hands on several occasions over the previous few decades, though is now a very safe Labour seat. There are below-national levels of unemployment claimants, for example at the end of 2010 male claimants were less than half as many as in Nottingham North. [4] The Labour majority has since grown to 6,000 in 2015 and over 15,000 in 2017, making it a safe seat.

The constituency is also the most politically diverse of the three city seats which together form Nottingham City Council. In the 2007 elections for Nottingham City Council, the constituency elected 9 of the 42 Labour councillors, 6 of the 7 Conservatives and 5 of the 6 Liberal Democrats. [5]

Boundaries

Nottingham South (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of constituency boundaries (since the 2010 general election); this was the first boundary change to the present constituency since its formation in 1983.

Nottingham South contains at least parts of both of the city's universities. The University of Nottingham's University Park Campus and Jubilee Campus are both in the constituency, as is the Clifton Campus of Nottingham Trent University. Many of these students are based in rows of terraced housing in the Lenton and Radford wards of this seat. A minority of students and much of the universities' staff are based in neighbouring Beeston, but this falls within the Broxtowe constituency.

2010–present: The City of Nottingham wards of Bridge, Clifton North, Clifton South, Dunkirk and Lenton, Leen Valley, Radford and Park, Wollaton East and Lenton Abbey, and Wollaton West.

1983–2010: The City of Nottingham wards of Abbey, Bridge, Clifton East, Clifton West, Lenton, Park, Robin Hood, Wilford, and Wollaton.

1955–1974: The County Borough of Nottingham wards of Bridge, Clifton, Lenton, and Trent, and the Urban District of West Bridgford.

1918–1955: The County Borough of Nottingham wards of Bridge, Castle, Meadows, and Trent.

1885–1918: The Municipal Borough of Nottingham wards of Bridge, Castle, Market, Meadow, St Mary, and Trent.

History

Since as early as 1295, Nottingham was represented by one large constituency which elected two members of parliament to the House of Commons. Under a major Act of 1885 three single-member subdivisions were created: Nottingham East, Nottingham West and Nottingham South.

Nine year absence of the seat

Nottingham South was abolished in the election of February 1974 but was re-formed with altered boundaries nine years later in 1983 from parts of Nottingham East and Nottingham West.

Modern demography

Nottingham South is the most diverse of the three constituencies in terms of economic demographics. It includes areas of higher incomes than average in the form of Wollaton and The Park Estate [3] and areas of relative poverty, both suburban and inner city. The council estate built next to and within the bounds of the village/parish of Clifton was once the largest in Europe.

Results to date excluding under the Blair Ministry when it was quite firmly Labour have produced the most marginal majorities of Nottingham City's three constituencies. The Conservative Martin Brandon-Bravo held the seat from 1983 to 1992. Since 1992, Nottingham South has been held by Labour MPs; Alan Simpson until retiring from the House of Commons in 2010 and Lilian Greenwood from 2010.

Wollaton Hall in Wollaton, one of the constituency's more affluent areas. Wollaton Hall small.jpg
Wollaton Hall in Wollaton, one of the constituency's more affluent areas.

Communities or localities in Nottingham South include:

Elections

Election results for Nottingham South NottinghamSouthGraph.svg
Election results for Nottingham South

Elections in the 2010s

General election 2019: Nottingham South [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Lilian Greenwood 26,586 55.2 −7.2
Conservative Marc Nykolyszyn14,01829.1−1.8
Liberal Democrats Barry Holliday3,9358.2+5.0
Brexit Party John Lawson2,0124.2New
Green Cath Sutherland1,5833.3+2.1
Majority12,56826.1−5.4
Turnout 48,13460.6−7.0
Labour hold Swing −2.7
General election 2017: Nottingham South [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Lilian Greenwood 30,013 62.4 +14.8
Conservative Jane Hunt 14,85130.9−0.8
Liberal Democrats Tony Sutton1,5643.2−0.3
UKIP David Hollas1,1032.3−9.0
Green Adam McGregor5981.2−4.2
Majority15,16231.5+15.6
Turnout 48,12967.6+4.6
Labour hold Swing +7.7
General election 2015: Nottingham South [8]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Lilian Greenwood [9] 20,697 47.6 +10.3
Conservative Jane Hunt [10] 13,76131.7−1.2
UKIP David Hollas [11] 4,90011.3+8.9
Green Adam McGregor [12] 2,3455.4+3.9
Liberal Democrats Deborah Newton-Cook [13] 1,5323.5−19.6
TUSC Andrew Clayworth2300.5New
Majority6,93615.9+11.5
Turnout 43,46563.0+2.5
Labour hold Swing +5.8
The prospective candidates for the 2010 election at the University of Nottingham Students' Union's Big Debate at the East Midlands Conference Centre.
From left to right:
Tony Sutton (Liberal Democrats), Rowena Holland (Conservative Party), Ken Browne (UK Independence Party), Matthew Butcher (Green Party), Lilian Greenwood (Labour Party) University Park MMB G8 Nottingham South Debate.jpg
The prospective candidates for the 2010 election at the University of Nottingham Students' Union's Big Debate at the East Midlands Conference Centre.
From left to right:
Tony Sutton (Liberal Democrats), Rowena Holland (Conservative Party), Ken Browne (UK Independence Party), Matthew Butcher (Green Party), Lilian Greenwood (Labour Party)
General election 2010: Nottingham South [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Lilian Greenwood 15,209 37.3 −10.1
Conservative Rowena Holland13,43732.9+7.0
Liberal Democrats Tony Sutton9,40623.1+0.2
BNP Tony Woodward1,1402.8New
UKIP Ken Browne9672.4−1.5
Green Matthew Butcher6301.5New
Majority1,7724.4−17.1
Turnout 40,78960.5+9.9
Labour hold Swing −7.2

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: Nottingham South [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Alan Simpson 16,506 47.4 −7.1
Conservative Sudesh Mattu9,02025.9−1.3
Liberal Democrats Tony Sutton7,96122.9+6.3
UKIP Ken Browne1,3533.9+2.2
Majority7,48621.5−5.8
Turnout 34,84050.6+0.5
Labour hold Swing −2.9
General election 2001: Nottingham South [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Alan Simpson 19,949 54.5 −0.8
Conservative Wendy Manning9,96027.2−0.5
Liberal Democrats Kevin Mulloy6,06416.6+3.7
UKIP David Bartrop6321.7New
Majority9,98927.3−0.3
Turnout 36,60550.1−16.9
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: Nottingham South [17]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Alan Simpson 26,825 55.3 +7.6
Conservative Brian Kirsch13,46127.7−14.1
Liberal Democrats Gary Long6,26512.9+2.9
Referendum Ken Thompson1,5233.1New
National Democrats Sharron Edwards4460.9New
Majority13,36427.6+21.7
Turnout 48,52067.0−7.2
Labour hold Swing +10.8
General election 1992: Nottingham South [18] [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Alan Simpson 25,771 47.7 +6.9
Conservative Martin Brandon-Bravo 22,59041.8−3.2
Liberal Democrats Gareth Long5,40810.0−4.2
Natural Law Julianne Christou2630.5New
Majority3,1815.9N/A
Turnout 54,03274.2+1.2
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +5.0

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: Nottingham South [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Martin Brandon-Bravo 23,921 45.0 −0.9
Labour Alan Simpson 21,68740.8+6.7
SDP Leighton Williams7,51714.2−5.8
Majority2,2344.2−7.6
Turnout 53,12573.0+2.8
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Nottingham South [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Martin Brandon-Bravo 22,238 45.9
Labour Ken Coates 16,52334.1
Liberal Raymond Poynter9,69720.0
Majority5,71511.8
Turnout 48,45870.2
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1970: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Norman Fowler 26,726 53.75
Labour George Perry 23,03146.25
Majority3,7317.50N/A
Turnout 49,79370.03
Conservative gain from Labour Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour George Perry 24,580 50.32
Conservative William Clark 24,26849.68
Majority3160.64N/A
Turnout 48,84875.61
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
General election 1964: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Clark 23,594 45.97
Labour William Frederick Back21,04641.00
Liberal Brian S Stratford6,69013.03New
Majority2,5484.97
Turnout 51,32978.17
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Clark 29,607 57.11
Labour John Silkin 22,23542.89
Majority7,37214.22
Turnout 51,84572.49
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1955: Nottingham South [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Denis Keegan 29,145 56.88
Labour Co-op Norman Smith 22,09243.12
Majority7,05313.76N/A
Turnout 51,24078.29
Conservative gain from Labour Co-op Swing
General election 1951: Nottingham South [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Co-op Norman Smith 19,844 50.61
Conservative William Rees-Davies 19,36249.39
Majority4821.22
Turnout 39,20684.47
Labour Co-op hold Swing
General election 1950: Nottingham South [24]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Co-op Norman Smith 18,806 48.03
Conservative William Rees-Davies 17,16543.82New
Liberal Ernest Gwynne Watkins3,1828.13
Majority1,6414.19
Turnout 39,15385.37
Labour Co-op hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Nottingham South [25]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Co-op Norman Smith 15,316 50.46
National Frank Markham 10,76635.47N/A
Liberal Ronald James Rae Blindell4,27214.07
Majority4,55014.99
Turnout 30,35475.91
Labour Co-op gain from National Labour Swing

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1935: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Labour Frank Markham 15,559 52.24
Labour T. J. May10,96336.81
Liberal Joseph Mawdesley3,26010.95New
Majority4,59615.43
Turnout 29,78270.95
National Labour hold Swing
General election 1931: Nottingham South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
National Labour Holford Knight 22,852 68.35 New
Labour Alonzo Ralph Ellis 10,58331.65
Majority12,26936.70
Turnout 33,43577.57
National Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Nottingham South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Holford Knight 14,800 42.9 +3.6
Unionist Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 14,25241.319.4
Liberal Leslie Hale 5,44515.8New
Majority5481.6N/A
Turnout 34,49780.4+8.1
Registered electors 42,920
Labour gain from Unionist Swing +11.5
General election 1924: Nottingham South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 13,725 60.7 +9.3
Labour Henry Mills8,89739.3New
Majority4,82821.45.2
Turnout 22,62272.3+4.7
Registered electors 31,271
Unionist hold Swing N/A
General election 1923: Nottingham South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 10,724 51.4 24.9
Independent Labour Henry Mills5,17624.8+1.1
Liberal Victor Deidorichs Duval4,96623.8New
Majority5,54826.626.0
Turnout 20,86667.6+1.3
Registered electors 30,847
Unionist hold Swing 13.0
General election 1922: Nottingham South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 15,158 76.3 +1.9
Independent Labour Henry Mills4,70623.71.9
Majority10,45252.6+3.8
Turnout 19,86466.3+15.4
Registered electors 29,951
Unionist hold Swing +1.9

Elections in the 1910s

General election 1918: Nottingham South [26]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
C Unionist Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 10,88174.4+22.8
Independent Labour Henry Mills3,73825.6New
Majority7,14348.8+45.6
Turnout 14,61947.947.0
Registered electors 30,528
Unionist hold Swing N/A
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.
General election December 1910: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 6,151 51.6 +0.1
Lib-Lab Arthur Richardson 5,76648.40.1
Majority3853.2+2.0
Turnout 11,91784.94.1
Registered electors 14,031
Conservative hold Swing +0.1
General election January 1910: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 6,434 51.5 +4.9
Lib-Lab Arthur Richardson 6,05248.54.9
Majority3823.0N/A
Turnout 12,48689.0+2.4
Registered electors 14,031
Conservative gain from Lib-Lab Swing +4.9

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Lib-Lab Arthur Richardson 6,314 53.4 +10.9
Conservative Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 5,51446.610.9
Majority8006.8N/A
Turnout 11,82886.6+12.6
Registered electors 13,656
Lib-Lab gain from Conservative Swing +10.9
General election 1900: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 5,298 57.5 +5.1
Liberal Henry Yorke Stanger 3,91442.55.1
Majority1,38415.0+10.2
Turnout 9,21274.06.6
Registered electors 12,442
Conservative hold Swing +5.1

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Cavendish-Bentinck 4,802 52.4 +1.9
Liberal Frederick William Maude4,36947.61.9
Majority4334.8+3.8
Turnout 9,17180.61.7
Registered electors 11,377
Conservative hold Swing +1.9
General election 1892: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Smith Wright 4,570 50.5 1.0
Liberal John Fletcher Moulton 4,48749.5+1.0
Majority831.02.0
Turnout 9,05782.3+12.5
Registered electors 11,010
Conservative hold Swing 1.0

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Henry Smith Wright 4,586 51.5 +3.4
Liberal John Williams 4,31748.53.4
Majority2693.0N/A
Turnout 8,90369.85.5
Registered electors 12,751
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.4
General election 1885: Nottingham South [27]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal John Williams 4,983 51.9
Conservative Henry Smith Wright 4,62048.1
Majority3633.8
Turnout 9,60375.3
Registered electors 12,751
Liberal win (new seat)

See also

Notes

  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.

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References

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  10. "Jane Hunt: Candidate for Nottingham South". Conservative Party. Archived from the original on 11 August 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  11. "Candidate: David Hollas MBE". UK Independence Party. Archived from the original on 8 December 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
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  13. "Deborah Newton-Cook". East Midlands Liberal Democrats.
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Coordinates: 52°55′N1°10′W / 52.92°N 1.17°W / 52.92; -1.17