Smithsonian Folklife Festival

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The Bhutan section of the 2008 festival. Bhutan Tents from 2008.jpg
The Bhutan section of the 2008 festival.

The Smithsonian Folklife Festival, launched in 1967, is an international exhibition of living cultural heritage presented annually in the summer in Washington, D.C. in the United States. [1] It is held on the National Mall for two weeks around the Fourth of July (the U.S. Independence Day) holiday. [1] The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage produces the Festival. [1]

Contents

Smithsonian Folklife Festival 2014 2014 smithsonian folklife festival DC (14598533051).jpg
Smithsonian Folklife Festival 2014

The Festival is free to the public, encouraging cultural exchange. [1] Attracting more than one million visitors yearly, the two-week-long celebration is the largest annual cultural event in the United States capital. Usually divided into programs featuring a nation, region, state or theme, the Festival has featured tradition bearers from more than 90 nations, every region of the United States, scores of ethnic communities, more than 100 American Indian groups, and some 70 different occupations. [1]

The Festival generally includes daily and evening programs of music, song, dance, celebratory performance, crafts and cooking demonstrations, storytelling, illustrations of workers' culture, and narrative sessions for discussing cultural issues. [1] Cultural practitioners speak for themselves, with each other, and to the public. [1] Visitors participate, learning, singing, dancing, eating traditional foods, and conversing with people that the Festival program presents. [1]

List of programs by year

The regions and topics featured at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival since its inception in 1967: [2]

No.YearTopics
532019 [3] Social Power of Music [4] (Festival shortened to two days and downscaled due to effects of the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown. [5] )
522018 [6] Armenia: Creating Home; [7] Catalonia: Tradition and Creativity from the Mediterranian; [8] Sisterfire: Roadwork 40th Anniversary Concert [9]
512017 [10] Circus Arts; [11] On The Move: Migration Across Generations; [12] 50 Years, 50 Objects: Storied Objects from the Smithsonian Folklife Festival; [13] 50th Anniversary: 1967-2017 [14]
502016 [15] Basque: Innovation by Culture; [16] Sounds of California [17]
492015 [18] Perú: Pachamama [19]
482014 [20] China: Tradition and the Art of Living; [21] Kenya: Mambo Poa [22]
472013 [23] Hungarian Heritage: Roots to Revival; One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage; The Will to Adorn: African American Diversity, Style and Identity [24]
462012 [25] Campus and Community: Public and Land-grant Universities and the USDA at 150; Citified: Arts and Creativity East of the Anacostia River; Creativity and Crisis: Unfolding The AIDS Memorial Quilt [26]
452011 [27] Colombia: The Nature of Culture; Peace Corps: 50th Anniversary; Rhythm and Blues: Tell It Like It Is [28]
442010 [29] Asian Pacific American Connections: Local Lives, Global Ties; México; Smithsonian Inside Out; Special Events: Haiti, Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert, George Wallace, Smithsonian 3D [30]
432009 [31] Giving Voice: The Power of Words in African American Culture; Las Américas: Un Mundo Musical (The Americas: A Musical World); Wales Smithsonian Cymru [32] [33]
422008 Bhutan: Land of the Thunder Dragon; NASA: Fifty Years and Beyond; Texas: A Celebration of Music, Food, and Wine [34]
412007 Mekong River: Connecting Cultures; Northern Ireland at the Smithsonian; Roots of Virginia Culture
402006 Alberta at the Smithsonian; Been in the Storm So Long: New Orleans Evening Concert Series; Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions; Nuestra Música: Latino Chicago
392005Food Culture USA, Forest Service, Culture, and Community; Oman: Desert, Oasis, and Sea; Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture
382004 Haiti: Freedom and Creativity from the Mountains to the Sea; Nuestra Música: Music in Latino Culture; Water Ways: Mid-Atlantic Maritime Communities
372003 Appalachia: Heritage and Harmony; Scotland at the Smithsonian; Mali: From Timbuktu to Washington
362002The Silk Road: Connecting Cultures, Creating Trust, including exhibits on Venice, Istanbul, Samarkand, nomads, Xi'an, truck art from Pakistan, and Nara [35] [36]
352001 New York City at the Smithsonian, Masters of the Building Arts; Bermuda Connections
342000El Rio, Tibetan Culture: Beyond the Land of Snows; Washington, D.C.: It's Our Home
331999Celebrating New Hampshire's Stories; Gateways to Romania; South Africa: Crafting the Economic Renaissance of the Rainbow Nation
321998 Wisconsin; Rio Grande/rio Bravo Basin; Baltic Nations: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; Pahiyas: A Philippine Harvest; Folkways 50th
311997 Mississippi Delta; African Immigrant Folklife; Sacred Sounds
301996 Iowa-Community Style; American South; Working at the Smithsonian
291995 Cape Verdean Connection; Russian Roots/American Branches; Heartbeat: Voices of First Nations Women;Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation
281994Masters of Traditional Arts: National Heritage Fellowships, The Bahamas, Thailand, Culture and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
271993US-Mexico Borderlands, American Social Dance, metro Music, Kids' Stuff
261992 New Mexico, Creativity and Resistance: Maroon Culture in the Americas, Workers at the White House, the Changing Soundscape in Indian Country
251991Family Farming in the Heartland; Indonesia: Forest, Field, and Sea; Land in Native American Cultures; Roots of Rhythm and Blues: the Robert Johnson Era
241990 US Virgin Islands, Senegal, Musics of Struggle
231989 Hawaii, Cultural Conservation: American Indian Program; "Les Fetes Chez Nous": France and North America, Quincentenary Program: The Caribbean-Cultural Encounters in the New World
221988Ingenuity and Tradition: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Cultural Conservation: American Folklore Society Centennial; Migration to Metropolitan Washington: Making a New Place Home; Music from the Peoples of the Soviet Union; Music Festival Stage: Bluegrass
211987 Michigan; Cultural Conservation and Languages: America's Many Voices; Metropolitan Washington
201986 Tennessee; Japan; Cultural Conservation: Traditional Crafts in a Post-industrial Age; American Trial Lawyers; 20th Anniversary Music Stage
191985 Louisiana; India: Mela!; Cultural Conservation: Makah and Puerto Rican mask makers; African American cornrowers, Kmhmu craftsmen, Seneca basket makers, Appalachian balladry, Cajun music, cowboy music, song, and poetry, Irish music, Mayan marimba music Mayan Indian weaving
181984 Alaska, The Grand Generation: Folklore and Aging, Black Urban Expressive Culture from Philadelphia
171983 New Jersey, France, Occupational Culture: Flight, NEA: National Heritage Fellowship Awards
161982 Oklahoma, Korea, Children's Program, National Endowment for the Arts Program
151981Regional America: Southeastern U.S. music and crafts, Northeastern music and dance; Native American Program: Ojibwa Indians; Old Ways in the New World: South Slavic Americans; Energy and Community: Adobe architecture; Children's Program; Folklore of the Deaf; American Tent Show, National Endowment for the Arts Program
141980Old Ways in the New World: Caribbean Americans, Southeast Asian Americans, Finnish Americans; Energy and Community: Folk housing and energy efficiency, community activities, food preservation; American Talkers: Auctioneers, pitchmen, street criers
131979Energy and Community: Native American architecture; Folklore in Your Community; Children's Program; Medicine Show
121978Native American Community: San Juan Pueblo of New Mexico; Occupational Community: Organ builders, sleeping car porters, sharecroppers; Energy and Community: Oil and coal industry workers; Ethnic Community: Ellis Island and American Immigration; Regional Community: Chesapeake Bay, Smith Island; Mexican Communities
111977 Virginia; Native American Program: Ojibwa, Tolowa, San Juan Pueblo, Navajo, Seneca; Working Americans: Folklore in Your Community
101976Regional America: Northeast, Great Lakes, South, Upland South, Heartland, Great West, Pacific Northwest, Pacific Southwest; Native American Program: Tribes from the Northeast, Southeast, Southern Plains, Prairie, Northern Plains, Northwest Coast, Southwest, Plateau, Basin, Northern California, Arctic; Working Americans; Old Ways in the New World; Children's Program; Family Folklore
91975Regional America: Northern Plains, California Heartland; Native American Program: Iroquois Confederacy; Working Americans: Railroad workers, aircraft employees, truckers, seafarers; Old Ways in the New World: Germany, Italy, Lebanon, Japan, Mexico; African Diaspora: Jamaica, Ghana, Haiti; Children's Program; Family Folklore
81974 Mississippi; Native American Program: California tribes; Working Americans: Graphic artists, radio operators (amateur/commercial); Old Ways in the New World: Sweden, Norway, Finland, Tunisia, Greece; African Diaspora: Ghana, Trinidad & Tobago, Nigeria, Caribbean; Children's Program; Family Folklore; Performance: Evolution of American Folk Music
71973 Kentucky; Native American Program: Northern Plains Indians; Working Americans: Plumbers, carpenters, electricians, stonemasons, lathers, bricklayers, plasterers, millwrights, operating engineers, pipe fitters, sheet metal workers, steam fitters; Old Ways in the New World: Britain, Yugoslavia
61972 Maryland; Native American Program: Southwest Indians; Labor Program: ILGWU, lithographers and photoengravers, carpenters and joiners, molders and allied workers; Performance: Chicago blues, old-time country blues, gospel, First Annual Fiddlers' Convention
51971 Ohio; Native American Program: Northwest Coast Indians; Labor Program: Meat cutters and butchers; bakery and confectionery workers; glass bottle blowers; bridge, structural, and ornamental iron workers; Performance: Puerto Rican music and dance, Cajun music, country music, ragtime, shouts, jubilees, work songs, blues, Caribbean music and dance, rock and roll, rhythm and blues, old-time banjo and fiddle music
41970 Arkansas; Native American Program: Southern Plains Indians; Performance: Spanish, Irish, and Scottish bagpipers, country, bluegrass music, southern blues, Sacred Harp, Portuguese-American Fado musicians, Chinese dragon dancers, shouts, spirituals, jubilees, string bands, East European folk songs; Crafts: Dairy traditions
31969 Pennsylvania; Performance: French singers from New Hampshire and Louisiana, Grand Ole Opry performers, Turkish, Afro-Cuban, Greek singers and dancers, ballad singers, string bands, fife and drum bands, blues, shouts, jubilees, spirituals; Crafts: Sheep shearing and wool processing, corn culture, Seminole Indian crafts, carvers and toy makers, doll makers, blacksmiths, basket maker, potter; Toby Show: Traditional Touring Tent Theater
21968 Texas; Native American Program: Lummi Indians; City-Country Area: Blues, bluegrass, jazz, gospel, Cajun, Basque, Indian, dancers, ballad singers; Crafts: Butter churning, sheep shearing, soap, candy, sorghum making, milling
11967Performance: American fife and drum groups; brass bands; string bands; gospel; shouts; jubilees; spirituals; Puerto Rican music; New Orleans jazz; Cajun music; ballads; Mesquakie Indian music; blues; country music; polka music; cowboy songs; clogging; Scottish, Russian, Irish dancers; Chinese New Year's Pantomime; King Island Eskimo dancers; dance of Galicia; Crafts: American basket makers, carvers, doll makers, needleworkers, potters, blacksmith, silversmith, spinners, weavers

Scenes from the 2008 festival

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References

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