Thomaston Central Historic District

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Thomaston Central Historic District
Thomaston Baptist Church.JPG
Thomaston Baptist Church, included in the Thomaston Central Historic District.
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Location Thomaston,  Alabama
Coordinates 32°16′8.50″N87°37′31.08″W / 32.2690278°N 87.6253000°W / 32.2690278; -87.6253000 Coordinates: 32°16′8.50″N87°37′31.08″W / 32.2690278°N 87.6253000°W / 32.2690278; -87.6253000
Built1875-1974
Architectural style Queen Anne, Colonial Revival
NRHP reference No. 00001023 [1]
Added to NRHP14 October 2000 [1]

The Thomaston Central Historic District is a historic district in the town of Thomaston, Alabama, United States. Thomaston was founded in 1901, the same year that the B.S. & N.O. Railroad, now CSX Transportation, went through the town. [2] The historic district features examples of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival architecture and is roughly bounded by Chestnut Street, Sixth Avenue, Seventh Avenue, Short Street, and the railroad. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Alabama: Marengo County". "National Register of Historic Places". Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  2. Marengo County Heritage Book Committee: The heritage of Marengo County, Alabama, page 13. Clanton, Alabama: Heritage Publishing Consultants, 2000. ISBN   1-891647-58-X