Timeline of the Irish War of Independence

Last updated

RIC and British Army trucks outside Limerick R.I.C. and military leaving Limerick (18442632000).jpg
RIC and British Army trucks outside Limerick

This is a timeline of the Irish War of Independence (or the Anglo-Irish War [1] ) of 1919–21. The Irish War of Independence was a guerrilla conflict and most of the fighting was conducted on a small scale by the standards of conventional warfare.

Contents

Although there were some large-scale encounters between the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the state forces of the United Kingdom (Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC)/Auxiliary Division and Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) paramilitary units—the Black and Tans, the Ulster Special Constabulary (USC) and the regular British Army), most of the casualties were inflicted in assassinations and reprisals on either side. The war began with an unauthorised ambush by IRA volunteers Dan Breen and Seán Treacy at Soloheadbeg in 1919 and officially ended with a truce agreed in July 1921. However, violence continued, particularly in the disputed territory of Northern Ireland, until mid-1922 (see The Troubles in Northern Ireland (1920–1922)). In the rest of Ireland, the war was followed by the Irish Civil War between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty.

1919

January 1919

February 1919

March 1919

April 1919

May 1919

Sean Hogan 1919 Sean Hogan 1919.jpg
Seán Hogan 1919

June 1919

July 1919

August 1919

September 1919

October 1919

November 1919

December 1919

Lord French Ambush Lord French Ambush (17069060140).jpg
Lord French Ambush

1920

January 1920

February 1920

March 1920

A Black and Tan in Dublin A Black and Tan on duty in Dublin.jpg
A Black and Tan in Dublin

April 1920

An armoured car outside Mountjoy Prison during a hunger strike by IRA prisoners Up Sinn Fein (6719164829).jpg
An armoured car outside Mountjoy Prison during a hunger strike by IRA prisoners

May 1920

June 1920

There was fierce fighting between republicans and loyalists in Derry in June 1920 Think there might be a sale on in that shop... (8578962057).jpg
There was fierce fighting between republicans and loyalists in Derry in June 1920

July 1920

Sectarian violence erupted in Belfast after loyalists forced Catholics from their jobs at Harland & Wolff shipyards (pictured in 1911) Knocking off at Harland & Wolff, Belfast.jpg
Sectarian violence erupted in Belfast after loyalists forced Catholics from their jobs at Harland & Wolff shipyards (pictured in 1911)

August 1920

September 1920

IRA volunteer Kevin Barry, who was hanged for his part in the killing of three British soldiers on 20 September 1920. Kevin Barry.jpg
IRA volunteer Kevin Barry, who was hanged for his part in the killing of three British soldiers on 20 September 1920.

October 1920

Funeral procession of Major E. Smyth and Captain A.P. White on the Quays in Dublin. Funeral procession of Major E. Smyth and Captain A.P. White on the Quays in Dublin (5785853490).jpg
Funeral procession of Major E. Smyth and Captain A.P. White on the Quays in Dublin.

November 1920

British soldiers and relatives of the Bloody Sunday victims during the military enquiry into the Croke Park massacre Military (6393759933).jpg
British soldiers and relatives of the Bloody Sunday victims during the military enquiry into the Croke Park massacre
Monument to the Kilmichael ambush of 28 November 1920, in which 3 IRA volunteers and 17 British Auxiliaries were killed Iarthair Chorcai 185.jpg
Monument to the Kilmichael ambush of 28 November 1920, in which 3 IRA volunteers and 17 British Auxiliaries were killed

December 1920

The Burning of Cork The Burning of Cork (9713428703).jpg
The Burning of Cork

1921

January 1921

British soldiers carrying out reprisals in Meelin, County Cork following an IRA ambush Military carrying out official reprisal following an ambush in Meelin, Co. Cork (29988005920).jpg
British soldiers carrying out reprisals in Meelin, County Cork following an IRA ambush

February 1921

British soldiers searching trains in Kerry for republicans British soldiers searching trains on Kerry line for republicans (17049192487).jpg
British soldiers searching trains in Kerry for republicans
Plaques on Friary Street, Kilkenny, commemorating the deaths of two IRA men on 21 February 1921. Kilkenny plaque.jpg
Plaques on Friary Street, Kilkenny, commemorating the deaths of two IRA men on 21 February 1921.
Memorial to Sean Allen in Tipperary Town, killed in Cork on 28 February 1921. Sean Allen house, Tipp.jpg
Memorial to Seán Allen in Tipperary Town, killed in Cork on 28 February 1921.

March 1921

RIC officers in Cork, 1921 Queueing for the sales%3F (16037145438).jpg
RIC officers in Cork, 1921
A funeral in Cork for IRA volunteers killed at Clogheen, late March 1921 Cork Funeral with military escort (16037291180).jpg
A funeral in Cork for IRA volunteers killed at Clogheen, late March 1921

April 1921

Auxiliaries and Black and Tans outside a hotel in Dublin, April 1921 Outside the London and North Western Hotel in Dublin, April 21, 1921.jpg
Auxiliaries and Black and Tans outside a hotel in Dublin, April 1921

May 1921

Tom Maguire TomMaguire.jpg
Tom Maguire
A British Whippet tank pulling a military lorry at the River Liffey, Dublin, 17 May 1921 Tank pulling three ton Military truck from the banks of the Liffey (27344726455).jpg
A British Whippet tank pulling a military lorry at the River Liffey, Dublin, 17 May 1921

June 1921

British soldiers at the aftermath of a firebomb attack on the Royal Army Motor Depot, Dublin, June 1921 Soldiers attending fire aftermath, Parkgate Street, Dublin 1920s (5796288940).jpg
British soldiers at the aftermath of a firebomb attack on the Royal Army Motor Depot, Dublin, June 1921
The Lord Lieutenant inspecting troops in Belfast during the opening of the Northern Ireland Parliament, June 1921 Troop Inspection Belfast City Hall 1920s W.D. Hogan Photographer (5807705678).jpg
The Lord Lieutenant inspecting troops in Belfast during the opening of the Northern Ireland Parliament, June 1921
Photographs of the train derailed at Adavoyle, printed in the Daily Mirror, 27 June 1921 Adavoyle train derailing.png
Photographs of the train derailed at Adavoyle, printed in the Daily Mirror, 27 June 1921

July 1921

A crowd outside the Mansion House, Dublin, the day before the truce was signed Crowd at Mansion House Dublin ahead of War of Independence truce July 8 1921.jpg
A crowd outside the Mansion House, Dublin, the day before the truce was signed

August 1921

September 1921

October 1921

A prayer vigil at Downing Street, London, during the Treaty negotiations Not an Irish Civil War Prayer Vigil after all! (7485579104).jpg
A prayer vigil at Downing Street, London, during the Treaty negotiations

November 1921

December 1921

Members of the Irish negotiation committee returning to Ireland after the Treaty signing The peacemakers- George Gavan Duffy, Erskine Childers, Robert Barton and Arthur Griffith in a group (28455606301).jpg
Members of the Irish negotiation committee returning to Ireland after the Treaty signing
Grave of Declan Hurton (IRA), killed at Thurles in December 1921. Irish War of Independence grave.jpg
Grave of Declan Hurton (IRA), killed at Thurles in December 1921.

1922

January 1922

February 1922

Free State Troops march across The River Shannon bridge in Atlone, to take over Victoria Barracks from the British Army who had just evacuated it. Athlone, February 1922. The barracks was renamed Custume Barracks. Handover of Custume Barracks -The Bridge, Athlone.jpg
Free State Troops march across The River Shannon bridge in Atlone, to take over Victoria Barracks from the British Army who had just evacuated it. Athlone, February 1922. The barracks was renamed Custume Barracks.

March 1922

April 1922

May 1922

June 1922

August 1922

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">The Troubles in Ulster (1920–1922)</span> Conflict in Northern Ireland

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References

Footnotes

  1. The war is often referred to as the "Irish War of Independence" in Ireland and as the "Anglo-Irish War" in Britain, the "Tan War" by anti-Treaty republicans and was known contemporarily as "the Troubles", not to be confused with the later conflict in Northern Ireland, also referred to as "the Troubles".
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