Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge

Last updated
Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge
IUCN category IV (habitat/species management area)
USA Washington location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Map of the United States
Location Yakima County, Washington, United States
Nearest city Sunnyside, Washington
Coordinates 46°16′59″N120°07′04″W / 46.28318°N 120.11782°W / 46.28318; -120.11782 [1] Coordinates: 46°16′59″N120°07′04″W / 46.28318°N 120.11782°W / 46.28318; -120.11782 [2]
Area1,978 acres (8.00 km2)
Established1964
Governing body U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Website Toppenish NWR

Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge is located on the Yakama Indian Reservation about 6 miles south of Toppenish, Washington, [3] in the agriculturally intensive Yakima Valley of eastern Washington state. Using the waters of Toppenish and Snake Creeks and supplemented with summer irrigation, managers are able to provide a mosaic of refuge wetlands interspersed with lush riparian and native upland habitats.

Wetland habitats rich with food attract thousands of wintering waterfowl, and during the summer, provide breeding grounds for an array of wetland-dependent birds, mammals, and plants. Winding its way through the refuge, Toppenish Creek serves an important role as one of the last remaining streams where Columbia River steelhead still reproduce in good numbers.

Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge is a place where people observe spectacular concentrations of waterfowl or participate in wildlife-dependent recreation such as hunting, wildlife photography or environmental education programs.

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from websites or documents ofthe United States Fish and Wildlife Service .

  1. "Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  2. "Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  3. McDonald, Cathy (October 9, 2008). "Take a walk in the Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 16, 2012.