Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

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Old Capitol building; home to OSPI Olympia old cap aug 05.jpg
Old Capitol building; home to OSPI

The Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, or OSPI is the state education agency for the State of Washington. The agency is bound by the Washington State Legislature to implement state laws regarding education, including the 1993 education reform act which mandated the controversial WASL standards based assessment. The Superintendent of Public Instruction is sixth (behind the Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, Auditor, and Attorney General, respectively) in the line of succession to the office of Governor of Washington. [1] The current Superintendent of Public Instruction is Chris Reykdal.

Contents

Like all members of executive branch, the Superintendent of Public Instruction was established as a partisan position by the Washington State Constitution in 1889. [1] However, an initiative to the people in 1938 made the position nonpartisan. Initiatve 126 passed 293,202 to 153,142 and is codified as Chapter 1 Laws of 1939. [2] [3] Pearl Wannamaker became the first nonpartisan superintendent when she was elected in November 1940.

The agency is headquartered in the Old Capitol Building in Olympia. [4]

Superintendents of Public Instruction [5]

Name (Political Party)Years
Rev. B.C. Lippincott1861
Dr. Nelson Rounds1872-1874
John P. Judson1874-1880
Jonathan S. Houghton1880-1882
Charles W. Wheeler1882-1884
R.C. Kerr1884-1886
J.C. Lawrence1886-1888
J.H. Morgan1888-1889
Robert Bruce Bryan (R)1889-1893;

1901-1908

Charles W. Bean (R)1893-1897
Frank J. Browne (P)1897-1901
Henry B. Dewey (R)1908-1913
Josephine Corliss Preston [6] (R)1913–1929
Noah D. Showalter (R)1929-1937
Stanley F. Atwood (D)1937-1940
Pearl Anderson Wanamaker1941–1956
Lloyd Andrews1956–1960
Louis "Louie" Bruno1960–1972
Frank (Buster) Brouillet 1973–1989 [7]
Judith Billings1990–1996
Teresa "Terry" Bergeson 1997–2008
Randy Dorn2009–2016
Chris Reykdal 2017 – present

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References

  1. 1 2 "Washington State Constitution". Washington State Legislature . Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  2. "Initiatives to the People". Office of the Secretary of State. Retrieved 26 Oct 2020.
  3. "Chapter 1, Initiative Measure No. 126, Non-Partisan Ballots" (PDF). Laws of Washington. 1939: 3–4.
  4. "Contact Us." Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Retrieved on June 16, 2009.
  5. Lind, Carol J. (1976). Territorial/State Superintendents, 1861 to Present. Olympia, WA: Superintendent of Public Instruction.
  6. "Mrs. Preston, Ex-School Official, Dies". Seattle Daily Times . December 12, 1958.
  7. http://app.leg.wa.gov/oralhistory/brouillet.pdf