Lewis County, Washington

Last updated
Lewis County
Lewis County Historic Courthouse.jpg
Lewis County Historic Courthouse
Map of Washington highlighting Lewis County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Washington
Washington in United States.svg
Washington's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 46°35′N122°24′W / 46.58°N 122.4°W / 46.58; -122.4
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Washington.svg  Washington
FoundedDecember 19, 1845
Named for Meriwether Lewis
Seat Chehalis
Largest city Centralia
Area
  Total2,436 sq mi (6,310 km2)
  Land2,403 sq mi (6,220 km2)
  Water33 sq mi (90 km2)  1.4%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total75,455
  Estimate 
(2019)
80,707
  Density32.5/sq mi (12.5/km2)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (PDT)
Congressional district 3rd
Website www.co.lewis.wa.us

Lewis County is a county in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 75,455. [1] The county seat is Chehalis, [2] and its largest city is Centralia. The county was created as Vancouver County on December 19, 1845, by the Provisional Government of Oregon, [3] named for George Vancouver. In 1849, the county name was changed, to honor Meriwether Lewis. [4] At the time, the county included all U.S. lands north of the Cowlitz River, including much of the Puget Sound region and British Columbia. [5]

Contents

Lewis County comprises the Centralia, WA Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Seattle-Tacoma, WA Combined Statistical Area.

Geography and natural features

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,436 square miles (6,310 km2), of which 2,403 square miles (6,220 km2) is land and 33 square miles (85 km2) (1.4%) is water. [6] One of the world's tallest Douglas fir trees was in the town of Mineral within Lewis County, attaining a height of 120 metres (390 ft). [7]

Geographic features

Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 558
1860 384−31.2%
1870 888131.3%
1880 2,600192.8%
1890 11,499342.3%
1900 15,15731.8%
1910 32,127112.0%
1920 36,84014.7%
1930 40,0348.7%
1940 41,3933.4%
1950 43,7555.7%
1960 41,858−4.3%
1970 45,4678.6%
1980 56,02523.2%
1990 59,3585.9%
2000 68,60015.6%
2010 75,45510.0%
Est. 201980,707 [8] 7.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1790–1960 [10] 1900–1990 [11]
1990–2000 [12] 2010–2019 [1]

2010 census

As of the 2010 Census, there were 75,455 people, 29,743 households, and 20,104 families residing in the county. [13] The population density was 31.4 inhabitants per square mile (12.1/km2). There were 34,050 housing units at an average density of 14.2 per square mile (5.5/km2). [14] The racial makeup of the county's population: 89.7% white, 1.4% American Indian, 0.9% Asian, 0.5% black or African American, 0.2% Pacific islander, 4.0% from other races, and 3.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 8.7% of the population. [13] In terms of ancestry, 24.1% were German, 14.9% were Irish, 12.5% were English, 7.7% were American, and 5.1% were Norwegian. [15]

Of the 29,743 households, 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.4% were non-families, and 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 41.5 years. [13]

The median income for a household in the county was $43,874 and the median income for a family was $53,358. Males had a median income of $43,695 versus $31,720 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,695. About 10.3% of families and 13.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over. [16]

2000 census

As of the 2000 Census, [17] there were 68,600 people, 26,306 households, and 18,572 families in the county. The population density was 28 people per square mile (11/km2). There were 29,585 housing units at an average density of 12 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 92.96% White, 0.38% Black or African American, 1.22% Native American, 0.69% Asian, 0.18% Pacific Islander, 2.55% from other races, and 2.01% from two or more races. 5.37% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.7% were of German, 11.8% United States or American, 11.1% English, 8.7% Irish and 5.7% Norwegian ancestry.

There were 26,306 households, 31.60% of which had resident children under age 18, 55.90% were married couples living together, 9.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.40% were non-families. 24.00% of households were made up of individuals, and 11.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.02.

The age distribution of the county's population: 26.50% under age 18, 8.20% from 18 to 24, 25.20% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% at or over age 65. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 98.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,511, and the median income for a family was $41,105. Males had a median income of $35,714 versus $23,453 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,082. About 10.40% of families and 14.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.60% of those under age 18 and 9.40% of those age 65 or over.

Government and politics

National level

In modern times, Lewis County is arguably the most conservative county in western Washington. It is significantly more Republican than adjacent counties, with the possible exception of Yakima County. Unlike much of western Washington, it has a strong tinge of social conservatism. In 2000 George W. Bush received over 60% of the county's vote. In 2008 John McCain defeated Barack Obama by over eighteen percent — his only victory in a county west of the Cascades. McCain lost all the neighboring counties except Yakima. [18] Since Washington's statehood in 1889 only three Democratic presidential candidates have carried the county – Grover Cleveland in 1896, Franklin Delano Roosevelt three times in 1932, 1936 and 1940, plus Lyndon Johnson in 1964. [19]

All told, as of 2019, 18 of the last 19 Republican presidential tickets successfully carried Lewis County, the only exception being that of Barry Goldwater who lost to the aforementioned Johnson.

As part of Washington's Third Congressional District it is represented by Republican Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler since 2011.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [20]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 62.5%21,99227.4% 9,65410.1% 3,553
2012 59.6%20,45236.9% 12,6643.5% 1,204
2008 58.0%20,27839.0% 13,6243.1% 1,067
2004 64.9%21,04233.1% 10,7262.0% 660
2000 61.9%18,56533.0% 9,8915.1% 1,530
1996 47.9%13,23837.4% 10,33114.7% 4,075
1992 45.3%12,31628.8% 7,81025.9% 7,042
1988 61.0%14,18437.1% 8,6291.8% 425
1984 66.2%15,84631.9% 7,6341.9% 451
1980 59.9%13,63630.6% 6,9629.5% 2,151
1976 51.7%10,93342.6% 9,0265.7% 1,208
1972 58.6%12,07133.7% 6,9467.6% 1,568
1968 47.0%8,77945.2% 8,4447.7% 1,445
1964 36.5% 6,93363.5%12,0700.1% 19
1960 56.5%11,01243.2% 8,4110.3% 57
1956 60.7%11,94939.2% 7,7140.1% 25
1952 62.8%12,28736.4% 7,1150.9% 169
1948 50.4%9,04746.8% 8,3942.9% 512
1944 53.2%8,89646.1% 7,7060.7% 124
1940 49.3% 9,22849.6%9,2801.2% 218
1936 35.2% 5,88557.6%9,6197.2% 1,201
1932 29.8% 4,64754.2%8,45416.0% 2,493
1928 71.1%9,25327.6% 3,5911.3% 166
1924 58.1%6,97312.9% 1,54429.1% 3,490
1920 54.6%6,16019.6% 2,21225.8% 2,913
1916 48.9%5,18640.7% 4,31810.4% 1,097
1912 32.7%3,20025.3% 2,47142.1% 4,115 [21]
1908 60.5%3,17026.9% 1,41212.6% 662
1904 69.9%3,09820.2% 8969.8% 436
1900 55.4%1,90740.2% 1,3824.5% 153
1896 48.4% 1,59450.2%1,6541.5% 49
1892 41.5%1,35031.2% 1,01427.4% 890

Gubernatorial races

In the 1970s, Democratic candidates for governor won the county, but this was something of an anomaly. The last Democratic candidate for Governor to win the county was Booth Gardner in 1984. [22]

State representation

The county's government is the 20th district of the state. It is represented solely by Republicans. [23]

County level

The county's government is solely Republican.

Communities

Cities

Town

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

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Chehalis, Washington City in Washington, United States

Chehalis is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 7,259 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Lewis County.

Fords Prairie, Washington CDP in Washington, United States

Fords Prairie is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,959 at the 2010 census.

Morton, Washington City in Washington, United States

Morton is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,126 at the 2010 census.

Napavine, Washington City in Washington, United States

Napavine is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,766 at the 2010 census.

Toledo, Washington City in Washington, United States

Toledo is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 725 at the 2010 census.

Vader, Washington City in Washington, United States

Vader is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 621 at the 2010 census.

Winlock, Washington City in Washington, United States

Winlock is a city in Lewis County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,339 at the 2010 census. It was named after territorial army general, Winlock M. Miller, who briefly resided there. Winlock is mostly famous for having the World's Largest Egg, reflecting its former status as a major producer of eggs. Early in its history, Winlock attracted many immigrants from Finland, Germany, and Sweden.

Woodland, Washington City in Washington, United States

Woodland is a city in Clark and Cowlitz counties in the State of Washington. Most residents live within Cowlitz County, in which the majority of the city lies. It is part of the 'Longview, Washington Metropolitan Statistical Area'. The population was 5,509 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. "Milestones for Washington State History — Part 1: Prehistory to 1850". HistoryLink.org. March 5, 2003.
  4. Oregon Spectator (Oregon City OR), "Name of Counties Changed", October 18, 1849, p. 3. Online at the University of Oregon Digital Archives
  5. "Action Bringing Lewis County Goes Back A Total of 115 Years". The Daily Chronicle . June 6, 1953. p. 10B. Retrieved July 26, 2018 via Newspapers.com. Lock-green.svg
  6. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved July 7, 2015.
  7. C. Michael Hogan (2008) Douglas-fir: Pseudotsuga menziesii, globalTwitcher.com, ed. Nicklas Strõmberg Archived June 4, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  9. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  10. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  11. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  12. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  13. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  14. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  15. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  16. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  17. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  18. The New York Times Electoral Map (zoom in on Washington state)
  19. Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868–2004, pp. 332–334 ISBN   0786422173
  20. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  21. The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 2,032 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 1,637 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 410 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 36 votes.
  22. David Leip’s US Election Atlas
  23. Lewis County, Democrats Archived July 3, 2008, at the Wayback Machine

Further reading

46°35′N122°24′W / 46.58°N 122.40°W / 46.58; -122.40 Coordinates: 46°35′N122°24′W / 46.58°N 122.40°W / 46.58; -122.40