Thurston County, Washington

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Thurston County
Thurston County Courthouse (Olympia, Washington).jpg
Map of Washington highlighting Thurston County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Washington
Washington in United States.svg
Washington's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 46°56′N122°50′W / 46.93°N 122.83°W / 46.93; -122.83
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Washington.svg  Washington
FoundedJanuary 12, 1852
Named for Samuel Thurston
Seat Olympia
Largest cityOlympia
Area
  Total774 sq mi (2,000 km2)
  Land722 sq mi (1,870 km2)
  Water52 sq mi (130 km2)  6.7%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total294,793
  Estimate 
(2021)
297,977 Increase2.svg
  Density368/sq mi (142/km2)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (PDT)
Congressional districts 3rd, 10th
Website www.co.thurston.wa.us

Thurston County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of the 2020 census, its population was 294,793. [1] The county seat and largest city is Olympia, [2] the state capital.

Contents

Thurston County was created out of Lewis County by the government of Oregon Territory on January 12, 1852. At that time, it covered all of the Puget Sound region and the Olympic Peninsula. On December 22 of the same year, Pierce, King, Island, and Jefferson counties were split off from Thurston County. [3] [4] It is named after Samuel R. Thurston, the Oregon Territory's first delegate to Congress. [5]

Thurston County comprises the Olympia-Tumwater, WA Metropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Seattle-Tacoma, WA Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 774 square miles (2,000 km2), of which 722 square miles (1,870 km2) is land and 52 square miles (130 km2) (6.7%) is water. [6]

Major watersheds: Black River, Budd/Deschutes, Chehalis River, Eld Inlet, Henderson Inlet, Nisqually River, Skookumchuck River, Totten Inlet and West Capitol Forest.

Geographic features

Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860 1,507
1870 2,24649.0%
1880 3,27045.6%
1890 9,675195.9%
1900 9,9272.6%
1910 17,58177.1%
1920 22,36627.2%
1930 31,35140.2%
1940 37,28518.9%
1950 44,88420.4%
1960 55,04922.6%
1970 76,89439.7%
1980 124,26461.6%
1990 161,23829.8%
2000 207,35528.6%
2010 252,26421.7%
2020 294,79316.9%
2021 (est.)297,977 [7] 1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]
1790–1960 [9] 1900–1990 [10]
1990–2000 [11] 2010–2020 [1]

2000 census

As of the census [12] of 2000, there were 207,355 people, 81,625 households and 54,933 families living in the county. The population density was 285 per square mile (110/km2). There were 86,652 housing units at an average density of 119 per square mile (46/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 85.66% White, 2.35% Black or African American, 1.52% Native American, 4.41% Asian, 0.52% Pacific Islander, 1.69% from other races, and 3.85% from two or more races. 4.53% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.1% were of German, 10.2% English, 9.8% Irish, 6.9% United States or American and 5.5% Norwegian ancestry.

There were 81,625 households, of which 33.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.10% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.70% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.99.

Age distribution was 25.30% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 29.30% from 25 to 44, 24.60% from 45 to 64, and 11.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median household income was $46,975, and the median family income was $55,027. Males had a median income of $40,521 versus $30,368 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,415. About 5.80% of families and 8.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.80% of those under age 18 and 5.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 252,264 people, 100,650 households, and 66,161 families living in the county. [13] The population density was 349.4 inhabitants per square mile (134.9/km2). There were 108,182 housing units at an average density of 149.8 per square mile (57.8/km2). [14] The racial makeup of the county was 82.4% white, 5.2% Asian, 2.7% black or African American, 1.4% American Indian, 0.8% Pacific islander, 2.2% from other races, and 5.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 7.1% of the population. [13] In terms of ancestry, 21.2% were German, 13.4% were English, 13.2% were Irish, 5.0% were Norwegian, and 4.7% were American. [15]

Of the 100,650 households, 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.3% were non-families, and 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age was 38.5 years. [13]

The median income for a household in the county was $60,930 and the median income for a family was $71,833. Males had a median income of $53,679 versus $41,248 for females. The per capita income for the county was $29,707. About 7.1% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.0% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over. [16]

Education

School Districts in Thurston County:

Higher Education in Thurston County:

Media

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

Politics

Thurston County leans Democratic. The county has consistently voted for the Democratic presidential candidate since 1988 and the candidates have consistently received majority of the vote in the county.

United States presidential election results for Thurston County, Washington [18] [19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 65,27738.82%96,60857.46%6,2493.72%
2016 48,62436.23%68,79851.27%16,76912.50%
2012 49,28738.58%74,03757.96%4,4163.46%
2008 48,36637.97%75,88259.57%3,1422.47%
2004 47,99242.55%62,65055.55%2,1471.90%
2000 39,92440.98%50,46751.80%7,0317.22%
1996 29,83534.18%45,52252.16%11,92313.66%
1992 25,64330.32%38,29345.28%20,63324.40%
1988 31,98047.78%33,86050.59%1,0901.63%
1984 34,44255.51%26,84043.26%7631.23%
1980 26,36948.10%20,50837.41%7,94614.49%
1976 21,00047.67%21,24748.23%1,8094.11%
1972 22,29757.48%14,59637.63%1,8994.90%
1968 13,74245.06%14,22846.65%2,5298.29%
1964 9,35134.61%17,57865.05%920.34%
1960 13,92154.37%11,62045.38%650.25%
1956 14,09358.70%9,89741.22%190.08%
1952 13,90458.32%9,76440.96%1720.72%
1948 9,51145.72%10,46150.28%8324.00%
1944 7,90044.47%9,70854.64%1580.89%
1940 7,27539.17%11,09259.72%2061.11%
1936 4,42528.05%10,64767.49%7034.46%
1932 4,24130.91%6,30845.97%3,17323.12%
1928 7,20369.59%3,01329.11%1351.30%
1924 5,12557.77%94310.63%2,80331.60%
1920 3,89952.77%1,36718.50%2,12228.72%
1916 3,22347.76%2,65839.39%86712.85%
1912 1,93730.69%1,45623.07%2,91846.24%
1908 1,94057.28%96428.46%48314.26%
1904 2,12168.51%66821.58%3079.92%
1900 1,29854.56%97841.11%1034.33%
1896 1,05242.27%1,41556.85%220.88%
1892 1,04341.70%81032.39%64825.91%


See also

Related Research Articles

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Lacey, Washington City in Washington, United States

Lacey is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. It is a suburb of Olympia with a population of 53,526 at the 2020 census. Lacey is located along Interstate 5 between Olympia and the Nisqually River, which marks the border with Pierce County and Joint Base Lewis–McChord.

Nisqually Reservation CDP in Washington, United States

The Nisqually Reservation, also known as Nisqually Indian Reservation is a federally recognized Indian reservation in Thurston County, Washington, United States. The population was 668 at the 2020 census.

North Yelm, Washington CDP in Washington, United States

North Yelm is a census-designated place (CDP) in Thurston County, Washington, United States. The population was 3,140 at the 2020 census.

Rainier, Washington City in Washington, United States

Rainier is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. Beginning as a train stop in the 1870s, Rainier was first settled in 1890, and was officially incorporated in 1947. The population was 2,369 at the 2020 census.

Tanglewilde, Washington CDP in Washington, United States

Tanglewilde is a census-designated place (CDP) in Thurston County, Washington, United States, part of the Urban Growth Area of the city of Lacey. The population was 6,265 at the 2020 census.

Tenino, Washington City in Washington, United States

Tenino is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,870 at the 2020 census.

Tumwater, Washington City in Washington, United States

Tumwater is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. The population was 25,350 at the 2020 census. It is situated near where the Deschutes River enters Budd Inlet, the southernmost point of Puget Sound; it also borders the state capital of Olympia to the north. Tumwater is the oldest permanent Anglo-American settlement on Puget Sound.

Yelm, Washington City in Washington, United States

Yelm is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. Its population was 10,617 at the 2020 census. At the beginning of the 21st century, Yelm was the 10th fastest growing city in the state in regard to population.

Washington State Route 510 Highway in Washington

State Route 510 (SR 510) is a state highway in Thurston County, Washington. The 13 miles (20.9 km) long highway extends southeast from an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) in Lacey to SR 507 in Yelm. SR 510 roughly parallels the Nisqually River, the border between Thurston and Pierce counties, between the Fort Lewis and Nisqually Indian Community area to Yelm.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2022.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Reinartz, Kay. "History of King County Government 1853–2002" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 1, 2007. Retrieved December 29, 2007.
  4. "Thurston County Place Names: A Heritage Guide" (PDF). Thurston County Historical Commission. 1992. p. 87. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  5. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved July 16, 2015.
  6. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021" . Retrieved April 7, 2022.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  11. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  13. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  14. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  15. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  16. Newspapers: The Olympian, McClatchy Company, archived from the original on March 7, 2013, retrieved February 13, 2013
  17. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  18. The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 1,471 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 1,160 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 270 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 17 votes.

Coordinates: 46°56′N122°50′W / 46.93°N 122.83°W / 46.93; -122.83