All-through school

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An All-through school is a school which provides both primary and secondary education [1] , namely from the 1st to 12th grade in the United States and from Year 1 to 13 in the United Kingdom. In the United Kingdom, they accept children at age 4, and school them right through to the age of 16 (or 18 with a sixth form). [1]

Primary school School in which children receive primary or elementary education from the age of about five to twelve

A primary school, junior school or elementary school is a school for children from about four to eleven years old, in which they receive primary or elementary education. It can refer to both the physical structure (buildings) and the organisation. Typically it comes after preschool, and before secondary school.

Secondary school A building and/or organization where secondary education is provided

A secondary school is both an organization that provides secondary education and the building where this takes place. Some secondary schools can provide both lower secondary education and upper secondary education, but these can also be provided in separate schools, as in the American middle and high school system.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

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In 2009, there were only 13 all-through state schools in England, but the Coalition Government's Free school (England) programme has seen the number expand rapidly. [2]

Free school (England) non-profit, independent, state-funded school in England, which is free to attend

A free school in England is a type of academy established since 2010 under the Government's free school policy initiative. From May 2015, usage of the term was formally extended to include new academies set up via a local authority competition. Like other academies, free schools are non-profit-making, state-funded schools which are free to attend but which are mostly independent of the local authority. Free school is not a generic term for any school that does not charge fees.

Definition

The term "all-through" can be legitimately applied to establishments in many different circumstances, but one commonly accepted definition is "schools which include at least two stages of a young person‟s education within the one establishment". [3]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Paton, Graeme (23 February 2014). "Record surge in the number of 'all-through' schools". ISSN   0307-1235 . Retrieved 28 August 2019.
  2. "'All-through' schools: From here to university". The Independent. 9 January 2014. Retrieved 28 August 2019.
  3. "Learning Together in Allthrough schools" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2014.