Comprehensive high school

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Comprehensive high schools are the most popular form of public high schools around the world, as compared to the common practice in some countries in which examinations are often used to sort students into different high schools for different populations. Some high schools specialize in University-preparatory school academic preparation, some in remedial instruction, and some in vocational instruction. The average comprehensive high school offers more than one course of specialization in its program. Comprehensive high schools generally offer a college preparatory course and one or more scientific or vocational courses. [1]

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References

  1. "Governor's Scholarship Programs". ScholarShare. Archived from the original on August 30, 2006. "A comprehensive public high school is a secondary school whose goal is to address the needs of all students, offering more than one course of specialization in its program. Comprehensive high schools usually have a college preparatory course and one or more scientific or vocational courses."

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