Junior college

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A junior college (sometimes referred to colloquially as a juco or JuCo) is a post-secondary educational institution offering vocational training designed to prepare students for either skilled trades and technical occupations and workers in support roles in professions such as engineering, accountancy, business administration, nursing, medicine, architecture, and criminology or for additional education at another college with more advanced academic material. Students typically attend junior colleges for one to three years.

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By country

Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, after completing the tenth-grade board exam (Secondary School Certificate), students attend two years of junior college, named intermediate college. After passing the SSC exam, students can apply for their desired colleges, where they study in three groups, namely Science, Humanities and Commerce for two years. After that, students sit for Higher Secondary Certificate at the end of their second year in intermediate College.

Canada

Quebec

India

In India, most states provide schooling through Class 12th. Telangana, Maharashtra, Odisha, Assam, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh, however, have a system of junior colleges where, after taking the 10th grade board exams (see SSLC, SSC), students have to apply to junior colleges to complete their Class 11th and Class12th . Junior colleges are also referred to as Pre-University Colleges (PUC). Junior colleges are frequently co-located with degree colleges.

Japan

In Japan after World War II, junior colleges (短期大学) typically provide two-year courses of study but may also provide a three-year course of study. Students who complete the course of study at a junior college are entitled to an associate degree or diploma. In Japan before World War II, there were three years of national junior colleges(旧制高校).

Netherlands

In the Netherlands, junior college is equivalent to MBO (middle-level applied education). The MBO lasts one to four years, depending on the level. There are 4 levels offered to students:

At all levels, MBO offers 2 possible pathways: a school-based education, where Training within a company takes between 20 and 59% of the curriculum, or an apprenticeship education, where this training represents more than 60% of the study time. Both paths lead to the same certification. Students in MBO are mostly between 16 and 35. Students of the "apprenticeship" path are overall older (25+). After MBO (4 years), pupils can enroll in HBO (Higher professional education) or enter the job market. [1]

Singapore

In Singapore, a Junior College (JC) is equivalent to a sixth form college in the United Kingdom. After the GCE 'O' level examinations in Secondary 4 or 5, students may apply for admission to either a JC or a polytechnic. The two years spent in a JC culminate in a GCE 'A' level certificate which is the most common qualification used for university admission.

In the past, secondary schools offered both 'O' and 'A' Levels and students in classes studying for the 'A' Levels were known as the "Pre-University" class. During the 1980s and 1990s, the government began the process of transferring all 'A' Level courses to centralised JCs. At present, students finish their 'O' Levels at a secondary school and may choose to take the 'A' Levels at a JC or as a private candidate.

South Korea

In South Korea, junior colleges (전문대학) typically provide 2-year courses of study but may also provide a 3-year course of study if permitted by presidential decree. [2] Students who complete the course of study at a junior college are entitled to an associate degree or diploma. [3] Junior colleges are also permitted, subject to presidential decree, to offer "advanced major courses" for their students that will lead to a bachelor's degree. [4] Junior colleges in South Korea include Yeungjin College and Jeonbuk Science College.

United Kingdom

United States

In the United States, a junior college is a two-year post-secondary school whose main purpose is to provide academic, vocational and professional education. The highest certificate offered by such schools is usually an Associate degree, although junior college students may continue their education at a four-year university or college, transferring some or all of the credits earned at the junior college toward the degree requirements of the four-year school. [5]

The term "junior college" historically referred to all non-bachelor's degree granting post-secondary schools. However, over the last few decades,[ when? ] many public junior colleges, which typically aim to serve a local community, have replaced "junior" with "community" in their names. Thus, most self-identified junior colleges in the United States today are private institutions, although only a small percentage of all two-year institutions are private. [6]

Private junior colleges in the United States reached their peak numbers in the 1940s, and have been declining ever since. [6] In the course of the 20th century, many public and private junior colleges evolved into four-year colleges, in some cases passing through an intermediary period as a four-year junior college; institutions that followed this trajectory include Westminster College in Salt Lake City and Shimer College in Mt. Carmel, Illinois.

Cultural connotations

Junior colleges in the United States have long had to contend with a reputation for low academic standards. The concept can be traced back 100 years to the original public junior college, Joliet Junior College, which was established in a high school as the equivalent of thirteenth and fourteenth grades, to prepare qualified students for the final two years of college. [7] To some extent, this is inherent in the junior college mission of providing practical education to students who for various reasons fall outside the typical profile of a four-year college student (for example, someone who has graduated from high school and spent several years working in a relatively unskilled job). Over the years, such colleges developed a reputation as schools of last resort. [8] According to federal statistics, 42% of public community college freshmen take remedial courses. [9] This does not necessarily affect their future transfer prospects: a junior college graduate with good grades can generally transfer to a four-year school and go on to obtain a full bachelor's degree. There is a growing movement of students who are attending junior colleges to save significant sums of money in the first two years of a four-year education. [10]

Athletics

Certain junior colleges also serve as incubators for college athletes, particularly in basketball and football; in sports parlance, they are often referred to as "Jucos". [11] A talented player who would not meet the academic standards of a major college program may be able to play for two years in junior college, establishing an academic record in the process, and then transfer to a major college. [11] This process has occasionally resulted in scandals, often involving the academics of the student athletes. [11]

Military junior college

In the United States, a military junior college is a military-style junior college that allows cadets to become commissioned officers in the armed forces reserve in two years, instead of the usual four. The students must go on to complete a bachelor's degree before serving as regular officers on active duty.

There are currently four military junior colleges:

See also

Related Research Articles

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Tertiary education Advanced level of education, usually for adults

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Vocational education studies that prepares a person for a specific occupation

Vocational education is education that prepares people to work as a technician or to take up employment in a skilled craft or trade as a tradesperson or artisan. Vocational education is sometimes referred to as career and technical education.

Student Learner, or someone who attends an educational institution

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Vocational school Higher-level learning institution providing education needed for specific occupations

A vocational school is a type of educational institution, which, depending on the country, may refer to either secondary or post-secondary education designed to provide vocational education, or technical skills required to complete the tasks of a particular and specific job. In the case of secondary education, these schools differ from academic high schools which usually prepare students who aim to pursue tertiary education, rather than enter directly into the workforce. With regard to post-secondary education, vocational schools are traditionally distinguished from four-year colleges by their focus on job-specific training to students who are typically bound for one of the skilled trades, rather than providing academic training for students pursuing careers in a professional discipline. While many schools have largely adhered to this convention, the purely vocational focus of other trade schools began to shift in the 1990s "toward a broader preparation that develops the academic" as well as technical skills of their students.

Australian Qualifications Framework

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The education system of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has been improved consistently since the mid-1900s. The role played by a good education system has been significant in the development of Jordan from a predominantly agrarian to an industrialized nation. Jordan has the highest number of researchers in research and development per million people among all the 57 countries that are members of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). In Jordan there are 8060 researchers per million people, while the world average is 2532 per million.

Academic certificate

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Community colleges in the United States Public, two-year colleges

In the United States, community colleges, are primarily two-year public institutions of tertiary education. Many community colleges also offer remedial education, GEDs, high school diplomas, technical degrees and certificates, and a limited number of 4-year degrees. After graduating from a community college, many students transfer to a university or liberal arts college to complete a bachelor's degree, while others enter the workforce.

Vocational education in the United States

Vocational education in the United States varies from state to state. Vocational schools are post-secondary schools that teach the skills necessary to help students acquire jobs in specific industries. The majority of postsecondary career education is provided by proprietary (privately-owned) career institutions. About 30 percent of all credentials in teaching are provided by two-year community colleges, which also offer courses transferable to four-year universities. Other programs are offered through military teaching or government-operated adult education centers.

References

  1. https://www.government.nl/topics/secondary-vocational-education-mbo-and-higher-education/secondary-vocational-education-mbo
  2. Higher Education Act, KLRI translation, current through 2013-08-13, Article 48.
  3. Higher Education Act, KLRI translation, current through 2013-08-13, Article 50.
  4. Higher Education Act, KLRI translation, current through 2013-08-13, Article 50-2.
  5. Arthur M. Cohen, and Florence B. Brawer. The American Community College (1st ed. 1982; new edition 2013) Excerpts; Comprehensive survey
  6. 1 2 Williams, Dana Nicole. ED327222 1989-12-00 The Survival of Private Junior Colleges. ERIC Digest
  7. John Merrow, Community Colleges: Dream Catchers, The New York Times, April 22, 2007.
  8. Beth Frerking, Community Colleges: For Achievers, a New Destination, The New York Times, April 22, 2007.
  9. John Merrow, Community Colleges: A Harsh Reality, The New York Times, April 22, 2007.
  10. John Merrow, Community Colleges: The Smart Transfer, The New York Times, April 22, 2007.
  11. 1 2 3 Robert Andrew Powell, Community College: Tennis in a Parking Lot, The New York Times, April 22, 2007