Carncastle

Last updated
Carncastle
village and civil parish
United Kingdom adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Coordinates: 54°53′N5°53′W / 54.883°N 5.883°W / 54.883; -5.883 Coordinates: 54°53′N5°53′W / 54.883°N 5.883°W / 54.883; -5.883

Carincastle or Cairncastle (from Irish : carn, meaning "mound", and the English word "castle") is a small village and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland near the town of Larne and inland from the village of Ballygally. It had a population of 66 people in the 2001 Census.[ citation needed ] It is part of the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area.

Contents

Churches

Cairncastle Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest congregations of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. The congregation was founded in 1646, four years after the foundation year of the Presbytery of Carrickfergus, which is the oldest presbytery in Ireland. The current minister is The Reverend Fiona Forbes, who was installed in 2014.[ citation needed ]

St Patrick's Church of Ireland has been the site of a church since medieval times.[ citation needed ] The date of its foundation is not known, but it appears in the papal taxation of 1306 as Karkastell. The present parish church was completed in 1815. Repairs in the early 1860s saw the roof replaced, roughcast removed from the walls, and smaller panes inserted in the windows. The pulpit and reading desk were moved to the east end and box pews replaced. The east window in St Patrick's was made by the Mayer Company in Munich.[ citation needed ] Further changes were made to St Patrick's in the twentieth century. The octagonal spire was rebuilt in 1960 and a Sunday School extension added in 1993. In 2007, following major restoration, the church was rededicated by the Archbishop of Armagh, the Most Revd. Alan Harper. A brass plate on the church's font tells states that it was used by Dean Swift when he was in Ballynure Church during his incumbency in 1695.[ citation needed ] The churchyard has probably been used as a place of interment since the medieval period. Within the churchyard is a Spanish chestnut tree, locally known as the “Spanish Armada Tree”. According to local legend, this Spanish Sweet Chestnut tree sprouted from seeds stored within a dead sailor's pocket. Supposedly, the 16th-century Spanish sailor buried beneath it had been carrying chestnuts with him while on his maritime journey, likely to ward off scurvy. The sailor was part of the Spanish Armada. Unfortunately for him and the rest of his crew,[ tone ] gales whipped the waves into a furious frenzy, blowing their ship off course and wrecking it near Northern Ireland.[ citation needed ] One sailor's body washed up on the shores of Ballygally in 1588, where kind locals discovered the corpse and buried it in an unmarked grave at St Patrick's Church of Ireland. But his grave didn't remain unmarked for long. Soon, a sapling sprouted from the wet earth. It somehow managed to survive, despite the strong winds that so often battered the village. Now dubbed the Armada Tree, it's viewed as an unlikely, unexpected transplant from the Spanish Armada. Scientists who analyzed the tree have dated it to the 16th century, adding some credence to its legendary origin story.[ citation needed ]

Knockdhu

Knockdhu (from Irish : Cnoc Dubh, meaning "black hill") is a Bronze Age promontory fort and settlement situated approximately one mile to the west of Cairncastle. The site consists of a set of three banks and ditches, Bronze Age roundhouses, and a probable gatehouse. It was excavated for the first time in 2008 for a Time Team episode that was first broadcast on 18 January 2009.[ citation needed ]

Game of Thrones

In the 21st century, Cairncastle's profile was raised due to the filming of HBO's fantasy series Game of Thrones . Season One used the mountains above Cairncastle for the location where Ned Stark executed Will, the deserter from the Night's Watch. This was at Knock Dhu, a basalt escarpment above the village.[ citation needed ]

Cairncastle Flute Band

One of the oldest Protestant marching bands in Northern Ireland. having been formed around 1855–1859. The band hold their practice sessions in Cairncastle but the majority of their members come from the nearby town of Larne.[ citation needed ]

Public House

One of the features of the small village is a small traditional pub called the Meeting House. It is also often referred to as Mattie Moore's, who was the former owner and operator of the pub during its early days. [1]

See also

Related Research Articles

County Antrim Place in Antrim Northern Ireland

County Antrim is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi) and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster.

Kilroot townland in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Kilroot is a townland, population centre and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies to the east of Eden, on the outskirts of Carrickfergus on the northern shore of Belfast Lough. It is within the Mid and East Antrim Bourgh council area.

Larne Civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Larne is a seaport and industrial market town, as well as a civil parish, on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, with a population of 18,755 people at the 2011 Census. The Larne Local Government District had a population of 32,180 in 2011. It has been used as a seaport for over 1,000 years, and is today a major passenger and freight roll-on roll-off port. Larne is administered by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council. Together with parts of the neighbouring districts of Antrim and Newtownabbey and Causeway Coast and Glens, it forms the East Antrim constituency for elections to the Westminster Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly. The civil parish is situated in the historic barony of Glenarm Upper.

Non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland

The Non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland is a non-creedal Christian Church, which maintains a great emphasis on individual conscience in matters of Christian faith.

Ballintoy Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Ballintoy is a small village, townland and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is alongside the B15 coast road, 28 km (17 mi) north-east of Coleraine, 8 km (5.0 mi) west of Ballycastle and between it and Bushmills. It is in the historic barony of Cary. The village lies about one kilometre from Ballintoy Harbour, a small fishing harbour at the end of a very small, narrow, steep road down Knocksaughey hill which passes by the entrance to Larrybane and Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. The harbour is host to a dawn service on Easter Sunday each year.

Newtownabbey Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Newtownabbey is a large settlement north of Belfast in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Sometimes considered to be a suburb of Belfast, it is separated from the rest of the city by Cavehill and Fortwilliam golf course. At the 2011 Census, Metropolitan Newtownabbey Settlement had a population of 65,646, making it the third largest settlement in Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council.

Ballymena Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Ballymena is a town in County Antrim, and the eighth largest in Northern Ireland. It is part of the Borough of Mid and East Antrim. It had a population of 29,551 people at the 2011 Census.

Ballynure village and civil parish

Ballynure is a village and civil parish near Ballyclare in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council and had a population of 677 people in the 2001 Census.

Ballygalley village

Ballygalley or Ballygally is a village and holiday resort in County Antrim, Northern Ireland which lies on the Antrim coast, approximately 3 miles north of Larne. It is also a townland of 769 acres and is situated in the civil parish of Carncastle and the historic barony of Glenarm Upper. It had a population of 821 in the 2011 Census. It is located within the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area.

Glenarm Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Glenarm is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies on the North Channel coast north of the town of Larne and the village of Ballygalley, and south of the village of Carnlough. It is situated in the civil parish of Tickmacrevan and the historic barony of Glenarm Lower. It is part of Mid and East Antrim Borough Council and had a population of 1,851 people in the 2011 Census. Glenarm takes its name from the glen in which it lies, the southernmost of the nine Glens of Antrim.

Glynn village and civil parish

Glynn is a small village and civil parish in the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies a short distance south of Larne, on the shore of Larne Lough. Glynn had a population of 2,027 people in the 2011 Census.

Ballycarry Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Ballycarry is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is midway between Larne and Carrickfergus, overlooking Islandmagee, and is part of the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 981.

Glenoe village in the United Kingdom

Glenoe or Gleno is a hamlet in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is halfway between Larne and Carrickfergus. In the 2001 Census, it had a population of 87 people. Glenoe is in the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area.

Armoy, County Antrim Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Armoy is a village and civil parish in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is 5.5 miles (9 km) southwest of Ballycastle and 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Ballymoney. According to an estimate in 2013 by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency it had a population of 1,122.

Ballyeaston village in the United Kingdom

Ballyeaston, formerly spelt Ballyistin, is a small village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is 2–3 km north of Ballyclare, on the road to Larne. It lies on the southern hill slopes overlooking Six Mile Water. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 90 people. It is within the Antrim & Newtownabbey Borough Council area.

Cloonfad Village in Connacht, Ireland

Cloonfad is a village in County Roscommon, Ireland, at the crossroads of the N83 National secondary road and the R327 regional road, about 10 km from the town of Ballyhaunis in County Mayo. A public walkway takes walkers to neighbouring villages through surrounding moorland. This habitat gave rise to the village's name in Irish - Cluain Fada or "Long Meadow". Cloonfad's local church, the Church of Saint Patrick, has been publishing an annual parish magazine since 1992 "The Cloonfad Magazine".

Patrick Adair (1625?–1694) was an Irish presbyterian minister, notable for his part in negotiations with government for religious liberty and settlement through his career.

Carnfunnock Country Park Public park in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Carnfunnock Country Park is a 191-hectare park located between Drains Bay and Ballygally, near Larne, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is situated on the A2 Antrim Coast Road, 3.5 miles north of Larne. The park consists of mixed woodland, colourful gardens, walking trails and spectacular coastline with panoramic views of the Antrim Coast and North Channel. and is owned and run by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council.

Kilwaughter

Kilwaughter is a small village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland near the town of Larne. It is in an electoral ward situated within the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area. Kilwaughter is a rural village or Hamlet.

References

Government

Time Team