Cary (barony)

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Cary

Cathraí [1] (Irish)
Cary barony.png
Location of Cary, County Antrim, Northern Ireland.
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Country Northern Ireland
County Antrim

Cary is a historic barony in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. [2] To its north is the north-Antrim coast, and it is bordered by three other baronies: Dunluce Lower to the west; Dunluce Upper to the south; and Glenarm Lower to the south-east. [2] The world-famous Giant's Causeway is situated on the north coast of Cary. Dunineny Castle lies in the civil parish of Ramoan within this barony. [3]

Contents

The barony is named after the Cothrugu (Cotraigib, Crotraigib), an ancient tribe. [4]

Geographical features

The geographical features of Cary include: [1]

List of settlements

Below is a list of settlements in Cary: [1]

Towns

List of civil parishes

Below is a list of civil parishes in Cary: [5] [6]

See also

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Castlereagh Upper Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Cary". Placenames Database of Ireland. Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. Retrieved 5 February 2011.
  2. 1 2 PRONI Baronies of Northern Ireland
  3. "Dunineny Castle". Placenames Database of Ireland. Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
  4. https://www.deliveranceireland.com/saint-patrick
  5. "PRONI Civil Parishes of County Antrim". Archived from the original on 2011-07-27. Retrieved 2010-06-26.
  6. "Baronies and parishes of County Antrim". Archived from the original on 2011-07-27. Retrieved 2011-02-05.