Randalstown

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Randalstown
Former railway viaduct at Randalstown (1) - geograph.org.uk - 347159.jpg
The former Northern Counties Committee railway viaduct at Randalstown railway station.
United Kingdom Northern Ireland adm location map.svg
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Randalstown
Location within Northern Ireland
Population5,126 (2011 census)
  Belfast 19 mi (31 km)
District
County
Country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ANTRIM
Postcode district BT41
Dialling code 028
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
Northern Ireland
Antrim
54°44′46″N6°18′22″W / 54.746°N 6.306°W / 54.746; -6.306 Coordinates: 54°44′46″N6°18′22″W / 54.746°N 6.306°W / 54.746; -6.306

Randalstown is a townland and small town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, between Antrim and Toome. It has a very prominent disused railway viaduct and lies beside Lough Neagh and the Shane's Castle estate. The town is bypassed by the M22 motorway with junctions at both the eastern and western ends of the town. It had a population of 5,126 people in the 2011 Census. [3]

Contents

History

The townland of Randalstown was originally known as An Dún Mór ("the great fort"), anglicised as Dunmore. This refers to a medieval motte-and-bailey castle built by the Irish on the west bank of the river Main just south of the town. [4] A castle known as Edenduffcarrick, later Shane's Castle, was built near Randalstown in the 14th century by the O'Neills of Clannaboy.

From at least the 1650s the town was known as "Iron Mills" (Muilinn Iarainn in Irish, anglicised "Mullynieren"). [4] In 1667, the town was created a free borough and was officially re-named Randalstown. [4] It was re-named to mark the marriage of Randal MacDonnell, 1st Marquess of Antrim to Rose O'Neill of Shane's Castle. [4]

The 1798 United Irishmen rebellion began in Antrim following a meeting to prepare for revolt by the Ulster Directory on 1 February 1798, at McClean's Inn, Randalstown. Robert McClean's "Great Inn" had long been an Irish Volunteers meeting place. Following his death in 1790, his son Francis became the proprietor. [5]

Dunmore Park was used as a training camp for the Ulster Volunteers during the Irish Home Rule crisis.

Randalstown has a strong history of linen and iron industries. A memorial to this history is in the middle of the town and made from the original turbine used to generate mains electricity for the town and items salvaged from the Old Bleach Linen Company founded by James Webb in 1864. An old linen mill chimney from the Old Bleach factory can be seen from most parts of the town. The Dorma Old Bleach factory which operated from a neighbouring site closed down in 2002.

The town used to have an active railway station which opened in 1848 by the Belfast and Ballymena Railway. The station connected the town to the Northern Counties Committee line. The station was closed in 1950 and has been disused ever since.[ citation needed ]

On 1 October 1989, a Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) car bomb exploded outside the town's police station on New Street causing serious damage to nearby property.[ citation needed ]

On 8 January 2010, PSNI Constable Peadar Heffron was seriously injured as a bomb exploded under his car on the Milltown Road near Randalstown. Dissident republicans were blamed for the attack. [6] [7]

Places of interest

Randalstown, County Antrim.jpg
OC Presbyterian Church Randalstown Old Congregation Presbyterian Church - geograph.org.uk - 636555.jpg
OC Presbyterian Church

Demography

In the 2011 Census Randalstown had a population of 5,126 people (1,996 households), [3] an increase of 3.4% on the 2001 Census population of 4,956. [11]

Of these:

Notable residents

Education

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Ireland, Culture Northern (8 February 2006). "Ulster's Hiddlin Swaatch". culturenorthernireland.org.
  2. "Baile Raghnaill/Randalstown". Logainm.ie.
  3. 1 2 "Census 2011 Population Statistics for Randalstown Settlement". Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). Retrieved 30 July 2019.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Place Names NI - Home". www.placenamesni.org.
  5. Ulster in '98: episodes and anecdotes. Robert Magill Young 1893 Marcus Ward Belfast
  6. "Car bomb officer Peadar Heffron's leg amputated". BBC NI News (13 January 2010). 13 January 2010. Retrieved 25 January 2010.
  7. "Robinson and McGuinness condemn attack on policeman in Randalstown". NI Executive - OFMDFM Press Release (8 January 2010). Retrieved 25 January 2010.
  8. THE PARALIAMENTARY DEBATES - Page cccxlix 1908 Erection of New School at Caddy, Randalstown. Mr. SLOAN (Belfast, S.): To ask the Chief Secretary to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, if plans and specifications have been prepared for the erection of a new school at Caddy, Randalstown ...
  9. British Bee Journal - Volume 102 - Page 259 1974 ... spirit level in setting the hive, and I have a vivid memory of a beautiful comb of eggs from a valuable breeder queen in Belfast being wrapped up for transport to Caddy, Randalstown, where nineteen virgin queens developed from it in 1953.
  10. "Census 2001 Usually Resident Population: KS01 (Settlements) - Table view". Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). p. 6. Retrieved 30 July 2019.
  11. Cullen, Pamela V., "A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams", London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN   1-904027-19-9