Glens of Antrim

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Glenariff Glenariff.jpg
Glenariff
Glendun: the Glendun Viaduct can just be made out among the trees in the middle distance, and on the skyline is Crocknamoyle Glendun - geograph.org.uk - 465779.jpg
Glendun: the Glendun Viaduct can just be made out among the trees in the middle distance, and on the skyline is Crocknamoyle

The Glens of Antrim, [1] known locally as simply The Glens, is a region of County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It comprises nine glens (valleys), that radiate from the Antrim Plateau to the coast. The Glens are an area of outstanding natural beauty and are a major tourist attraction in north Antrim.

Contents

The main towns and villages in the Glens are Ballycastle, Cushendun, Cushendall, Waterfoot, Carnlough and Glenarm.

The Lordship of the Glens

From the mid-13th century onward, the Lordship of The Glen belonged to the Bissett family, Anglo-Norman in origin but Gaelicized over generations. In the mid-16th century it came into the ownership of the MacDonnells of Antrim.

The nine glens

From north to south, the nine glens are:

Irish nameMeaningRef
Glentaisie Gleann TaiseTaise's valley/damp valley [1] [2]
Glenshesk Gleann Seiscbarren valley [1]
Glendun Gleann Doinnevalley of the [river] Dun [1] [2]
GlencorpGleann Corpvalley of the body (or bodies) [1] [3]
GlenaanGleann Athainvalley of the burial chamber [2] [4]
GlenballyeamonGleann Bhaile Uí Dhíomáin
Gleann Bhaile Éamainn
valley of Ó Díomáin's town
valley of Éamonn's town
[1] [2]
Glenariff Gleann Aireamhvalley of the ploughman/arable valley [1] [4]
Glencloy Gleann Claidheamhvalley of the sword [1]
Glenarm Gleann Armavalley of the army [1] [4]

Tenth glen

Glenravel is sometimes considered a tenth glen. It lies to the southwest of Glenballyeamon and Glenariff, being separated from the latter by the Glenariff forest park.

The main settlements of Glenravel are Cargan, Martinstown and Skerry (Newtowncrommelin).

Archaeology

Madman's Window in Antrim, ca. 1860 (National Library of Ireland) Madmans Window in Antrim.jpg
Madman's Window in Antrim, ca. 1860 (National Library of Ireland)

In the Glens there is evidence of Neolithic communities. At Glencloy, Neolithic people had megalithic tombs in the uplands, while they lived in settlements near the coast at the end of the valley. The beaches were sources of flint, as evidenced by stone tool (lithic) production sites in the glens.

At Madman's Window (near Glenarm) Neolithic chipping floors and stone axe rough-outs were found along with Neolithic pottery, scrapers, flakes, and leaf-shaped arrowheads. At Bay Farm in Carnlough, a Neolithic site near marshland, archaeologists found occupation debris, charcoal, postholes, flint cores, axes and Neolithic pottery. [5]

The Glens are mentioned in the song "Ireland's Call". DI Sean Duffy, in the Troubles mysteries by Adrian McKinty, is from the Glens.

See also

Related Research Articles

County Antrim County in Northern Ireland

County Antrim is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi) and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster.

Larne Town (and civil parish) in County Antrim, Northern Ireland

Larne is a town on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, with a population of 18,755 at the 2011 Census. It is a major passenger and freight roll-on roll-off port. Larne is administered by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council. Together with parts of the neighbouring districts of Antrim and Newtownabbey and Causeway Coast and Glens, it forms the East Antrim constituency for elections to the Westminster Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly. The civil parish is in the historic barony of Glenarm Upper.

Langdale axe industry

The Langdale axe industry is the name given by archaeologists to specialised stone tool manufacturing centred at Great Langdale in England's Lake District during the Neolithic period. The existence of a production site was originally suggested by chance discoveries in the 1930s, which were followed by more systematic searching in the 1940s and 1950s by Clare Fell and others. The finds were mainly reject axes, rough-outs and blades created by knapping large lumps of the rock found in the scree or perhaps by simple quarrying or opencast mining. Hammerstones have also been found in the scree and other lithic debitage from the industry such as blades and flakes.

Islandmagee Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Islandmagee is a peninsula and civil parish on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, located between the towns of Larne and Whitehead. It is part of the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area and is a sparsely populated rural community with a long history since the mesolithic period. In the early medieval period it was known as Semne, a petty-kingdom within Ulaid.

Ballygally Irish village

Ballygally or Ballygalley is a village and holiday resort in County Antrim, Northern Ireland which lies on the Antrim coast, approximately 3 miles north of Larne. It is also a townland of 769 acres and is situated in the civil parish of Carncastle and the historic barony of Glenarm Upper. It had a population of 821 in the 2011 Census. It is located within the Mid and East Antrim Borough Council area.

Glenarm Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Glenarm is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies on the North Channel coast north of the town of Larne and the village of Ballygalley, and south of the village of Carnlough. It is situated in the civil parish of Tickmacrevan and the historic barony of Glenarm Lower. It is part of Mid and East Antrim Borough Council and had a population of 1,851 people in the 2011 Census. Glenarm takes its name from the glen in which it lies, the southernmost of the nine Glens of Antrim.

A2 road (Northern Ireland)

The A2 is a major road in Northern Ireland, a considerable length of which is often referred to the Antrim Coast Road because much of it follows the scenic coastline of County Antrim; other parts of the road follow the coasts in Counties Down and Londonderry.

Glenariff

Glenariff or Glenariffe is a valley in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is one of the Glens of Antrim. Like other glens in that area, it was shaped during the Ice Age by giant glaciers.

Carnlough Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Carnlough is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It has a picturesque harbour on the shores of Carnlough Bay. Carnlough is on the Coast Road beside the North Channel and at the foot of Glencloy, the second of the nine Glens of Antrim. It is situated in Mid and East Antrim district, as well the historic barony of Glenarm Lower, and the civil parishes of Ardclinis and Tickmacrevan. It had a population of 2,084 people in 2016.

Cushendall Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Cushendall, formerly known as Newtownglens, is a coastal village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is in the historic barony of Glenarm Lower and the civil parish of Layd, and is part of Causeway Coast and Glens district.

Knocknacarry is a hamlet and townland about 1 kilometre west of Cushendun in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the historic barony of Glenarm Lower and the civil parish of Layd. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 138 people. It is within the Moyle District Council area.

Waterfoot, County Antrim Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Waterfoot or Glenariff is a small coastal village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is at the foot of Glenariff, one of the Glens of Antrim, within the historic barony of Glenarm Lower and the civil parishes of Ardclinis and Layd. The village is in the townland of Warren. The 2001 Census recorded a population of 504 inhabitants.

Cargan

Cargan is a small village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It lies at the foot of Slievenanee in Glenravel – locally known as "The Tenth Glen" along with the more widely known nine Glens of Antrim. It is part of Mid and East Antrim district. It had a population of 588 people in the 2011 Census.

Tievebulliagh

Tievebulliagh is a 402-metre-high (1,319 ft) mountain in the Glens of Antrim, Northern Ireland. It forms part of the watershed between Glenaan to the north and Glenballyemon to the south. It is situated about 4.4 km from Cushendall.

Ballyharry is a townland of 224 acres and an area of archaeological sites on Islandmagee, in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, where a number of well-preserved Neolithic house sites have been investigated. The townland is situated in the civil parish of Islandmagee and the historic barony of Belfast Lower.

Glenarm Lower Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Glenarm Lower is a barony in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. To its east runs the east-Antrim coast, and it is bordered by five other baronies: Cary to the north; Dunluce Lower and Kilconway to the west; Antrim Lower to the south-west; and Glenarm Upper to the south-east.

Kilconway Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Kilconway is a barony in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is bordered by six other baronies: Dunluce Upper to the north; Glenarm Lower to the east; Antrim Lower to the south-east; Toome Lower to the south; Loughinsholin to the south-west; and Coleraine to the north-east. Kilconway also formed part of the medieval territory known as the Route. Springmount Bog is located within the barony.

Ardclinis Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Ardclinis is a civil parish and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the historic barony of Glenarm Lower.

Prehistoric Cumbria

Prehistoric Cumbria describes that part of north-west England, subsequently the county of Cumbria, prior to the coming of the Romans. Barrowclough puts the archaeological record of the county at '443 stone tools, 187 metal objects and 134 pots', plus the various monuments such as henges, stone circles, and the like. The survival of these objects has been influenced by processes such as the rise in sea levels on the west coast, erosion, deposition practices, industrial and agricultural development, and the changing interests and capabilities of antiquarians and archaeologists.

Dooeys Cairn

Dooey's Cairn, or Ballymacaldrack Court Tomb, is a prehistoric site of the Neolithic period, situated near Dunloy, in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Logainm.ie (Placenames Database of Ireland)
  2. 1 2 3 4 Moyle District Council Area, Northern Ireland Place-Name Project, Queen's University Belfast
  3. "Glencorp". Place Names - NI. Retrieved 22 January 2021.
  4. 1 2 3 Place Names NI Archived October 1, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. O'Sullivan, Aidan; Breen, Colin (2007). Maritime Ireland. An Archaeology of Coastal Communities. Stroud: Tempus. p. 63. ISBN   978-0-7524-2509-2.

Coordinates: 55°09′36″N6°06′00″W / 55.16000°N 6.10000°W / 55.16000; -6.10000