Glossary of Australian rules football

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Australian rules football is known by several different names, including footy and Aussie rules. Leaping mark (21658978401).jpg
Australian rules football is known by several different names, including footy and Aussie rules.

This list is an alphabetical glossary of Australian rules football terms, jargon and slang. While some of these entries are shared with other sports, Australian rules football has developed a unique and rich terminology.

Contents

Where words in a sentence are also defined elsewhere in this article, they appear in italics.

0-9

A

B

Ruckmen contesting a ball-up Australian football ruckwork.jpg
Ruckmen contesting a ball-up

C

Defensive player giving chase to an attacking player with the ball Australian rules running chase.jpg
Defensive player giving chase to an attacking player with the ball
Player gains possession in a marking contest Australian football contested mark.jpg
Player gains possession in a marking contest
Player (foreground) moving in to collect the crumb from a contest Australian rules football action.jpg
Player (foreground) moving in to collect the crumb from a contest

D

Australian rules drop punt 1.jpg
Australian rules drop punt 2.jpg
Player executes a drop punt

E

F

Field umpire Australian rules umpire.jpg
Field umpire
A football, known colloquially as a footy Sherrin footy.jpg
A football, known colloquially as a footy

G

Player wearing a guernsey Australian rules footballer guernsey.jpg
Player wearing a guernsey

H

Player preparing to handball Australian rules handball.jpg
Player preparing to handball
Players in a huddle Bond University Bullsharks huddle.jpg
Players in a huddle

I

J

K

The follow through motion of a kick Follow through (21459803709).jpg
The follow through motion of a kick

L

M

Man-on-man Australian rules tagger.jpg
Man-on-man

N

O

The player on the left is on the mark Australian rules set shot.jpg
The player on the left is on the mark

P

Pack of players leaping for the ball Pack of Australian rules footballers.jpg
Pack of players leaping for the ball
Player performing a pick-up on the run Australian rules pick up.jpg
Player performing a pick-up on the run

Q

R

Player reading the ball Going for the ball (21024095524).jpg
Player reading the ball
Runner (right) with his team's coach Australian rules coach and runner.jpg
Runner (right) with his team's coach

S

Player preparing to smother an opponent's kick Australian football smother.jpg
Player preparing to smother an opponent's kick
Player takes a spectacular mark Spectacular mark Australian football.jpg
Player takes a spectacular mark
Player preparing to spoil an opponent's mark attempt by punching the ball Australian football spoil.jpg
Player preparing to spoil an opponent's mark attempt by punching the ball

T

Player lunging to tackle an opponent in possession of the ball Australian rules tackle.jpg
Player lunging to tackle an opponent in possession of the ball

U

W

X

Y

Z

Related Research Articles

Australian rules football Contact sport invented in Melbourne

Australian rules football, also called Australian football, or more simply football or footy, is a contact sport played between two teams of 18 players on an oval field, often a modified cricket ground. Points are scored by kicking the oval ball between the middle goal posts or between a goal and behind post.

Tackle (football move) Defensive move in various forms of football

Most forms of football have a move known as a tackle. The primary and important purposes of tackling are to dispossess an opponent of the ball, to stop the player from gaining ground towards goal or to stop them from carrying out what they intend.

Gaelic football Irish team sport, form of football

Gaelic football, commonly referred to as football, Gaelic or GAA “gah”, is an Irish team sport. It is played between two teams of 15 players on a rectangular grass pitch. The objective of the sport is to score by kicking or punching the ball into the other team's goals or between two upright posts above the goals and over a crossbar 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) above the ground.

International rules football Hybrid team sport between Australian rules and Gaelic football

International rules football is a team sport consisting of a hybrid of football codes, which was developed to facilitate international representative matches between Australian rules football players and Gaelic football players.

In rugby football, the penalty is the main disciplinary sanction available to the referee to penalise players who commit deliberate infringements. The team who did not commit the infringement are given possession of the ball and may either kick it towards touch, attempt a place kick at goal, or tap the ball with their foot and run it. It is also sometimes used as shorthand for penalty goal.

Harrow football Type of football

Harrow football is a code of football played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more bases (goals) than their opponent. Harrow Football is played predominantly with the feet, but players may use any part of their body including, in certain circumstances, their hands and arms to propel the ball. The leather ball is shaped like a giant pork pie, about 18 inches in diameter and 12 inches (300 mm) deep. It tends to soak up mud and water and become extremely heavy.

Mark (Australian rules football)

A mark is a skill in Australian rules football where a player cleanly catches a kicked ball that has travelled more than 15 metres without any other player touching it or the ball hitting the ground.

Laws of Australian rules football

The rules of Australian rules football were first formed by the Melbourne Football Club in 1859, and been refined over the years as the game evolved into its modern form. The laws significantly predate the advent of a governing body for the sport. The first national and international body, the Australasian Football Council, was formed in 1905 to govern Australian Football. Since 1994, the rules for the game known as Australian football have been governed by the AFL and the organisation's Laws of the Game committee.

Ruck (Australian rules football)

In Australian rules football, a ruckman or ruckwoman is typically a tall and athletic player who contests at centre bounces and stoppages. The ruckman is one of the most important players on the field. They are often key to coaching strategy and winning centre clearances which result in the most goal kicking opportunities.

In the sport of Australian rules football, the 50-metre penalty is applied by umpires to a number of different infractions when a free kick or mark has already been paid.

Free kick (Australian rules football)

A free kick in Australian rules football is a penalty awarded by a field umpire to a player who has been infringed by an opponent or is the nearest player to a player from the opposite team who has broken a rule.

Comparison of American football and rugby union

A comparison of American football and rugby union is possible because of the games' shared origins, despite their dissimilarities.

Rugby union gameplay

Rugby union is a contact sport that consists of two teams of fifteen players. The objective is to obtain more points than the opposition through scoring tries or kicking goals over eighty minutes of playing time. The play is started with one team drop-kicking the ball from the halfway line towards the opposition. The rugby ball can be moved up the field by either carrying it or kicking it. However, when passing the ball it can only be thrown laterally or backward. The opposition can stop players moving up the field by tackling them. Only players carrying the ball can be tackled and once a tackle is completed the opposition can compete for the ball. Play continues until a try is scored, the ball crosses the side line or dead-ball line, or an infringement occurs. After a team scores points, the non-scoring team restarts the game at the halfway with a drop kick toward the opposition. The team with the most points at the end wins the game.

A push in the back is a free kick awarded in Australian rules football against a player who illegally tackles or interferes with a player from behind. The rule is applied in two different circumstances: tackles and marking contests.

Rugby union is a team sport played between two teams of fifteen players.

This list of rugby league terms is a general glossary of the terminology used in the sport of rugby league football. The sport has accrued a considerable amount of jargon to describe aspects of the game. Many terms originate from the Laws of the Game. A number of aspects of the game have more than one term that refers to them. Different terms have become popularly used to describe an aspect of the game in different places with notable differences between the northern and southern hemispheres.

A penalty in rugby union is the main disciplinary sanction available to the referee to penalise a team who commit deliberate infringements. The team who did not commit the infringement are given possession of the ball and they may either kick it towards touch, attempt a place kick at goal, or tap the ball with their foot and run. It is also sometimes used as shorthand for penalty goal.

2009 AFL Grand Final

The 2009 AFL Grand Final was an Australian rules football game contested between the St Kilda Football Club and the Geelong Football Club at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 26 September 2009. It was the 113th annual grand final of the Australian Football League, staged to determine the premiers for the 2009 AFL season.

There are various individual skills and team tactics that are required to play Australian rules football effectively. These are dictated by tradition and the sport's laws.

2017 AFL Grand Final

The 2017 AFL Grand Final was an Australian rules football game contested between the Adelaide Football Club and the Richmond Football Club at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 30 September 2017. It was the 121st annual grand final of the Australian Football League staged to determine the premiers for the 2017 AFL season. The match, attended by 100,021 spectators, was won by Richmond by a margin of 48 points, marking the club's eleventh VFL/AFL premiership and first since 1980. Richmond's Dustin Martin was awarded the Norm Smith Medal as the best player on the ground.

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