Glossary of tennis terms

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This page is a glossary of tennis terminology.

Contents

A

B

A Ball boy in action Ball kid - 2010 Australian Open.jpg
A Ball boy in action

C

A tennis court with its dimensions and components Tennis court imperial.svg
A tennis court with its dimensions and components

D

An example of a dead net cord EVD-tenis-090.jpg
An example of a dead net cord

E

F

Example of a follow through action after the ball is hit 2014 US Open (Tennis) - Tournament - Bernard Tomic (14954485718).jpg
Example of a follow through action after the ball is hit

G

H

I

J

K

L

Line judges at Wimbledon Line Judges Centre Court.JPG
Line judges at Wimbledon

M

N

O

P

Q

R

A modern tennis racket Babolat pure drive plus.jpg
A modern tennis racket

S

Preparing to serve to start a point Azarenka Roland Garros 2009 2.jpg
Preparing to serve to start a point
Player preparing to hit a backhand slice shot Joao Souza (14706260226).jpg
Player preparing to hit a backhand slice shot

T

A standard optic yellow tennis ball Tennis ball 01.jpg
A standard optic yellow tennis ball

U

V

Approaching a forehand volley Tsvetana Pironkova 1, Wimbledon 2013 - Diliff.jpg
Approaching a forehand volley

W

Z

See also

Related Research Articles

Tennis Ball sport with racket and net

Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to maneuver the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will.

Table tennis Racket sport

Table tennis, also known as ping-pong and whiff-whaff, is a sport in which two or four players hit a lightweight ball back and forth across a table using small rackets. The game takes place on a hard table divided by a net. Except for the initial serve, the rules are generally as follows: players must allow a ball played toward them to bounce one time on their side of the table, and must return it so that it bounces on the opposite side at least once. A point is scored when a player fails to return the ball within the rules. Play is fast and demands quick reactions. Spinning the ball alters its trajectory and limits an opponent's options, giving the hitter a great advantage.

Squash (sport) Racquet sport

Squash is a racket and ball sport played by two (singles) or four players in a four-walled court with a small, hollow rubber ball. The players alternate in striking the ball with their racquets onto the playable surfaces of the four walls of the court. The objective of the game is to hit the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. About 20 million people play squash regularly world-wide in over 185 countries. The governing body of Squash, the World Squash Federation (WSF), is recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), but the sport is not part of the Olympic Games, despite a number of applications. Supporters continue to lobby for its incorporation in a future Olympic program.

Guillermo Coria Argentine tennis player

Guillermo Sebastián Coria, nicknamed El Mago, is a retired tennis player from Argentina. He reached a career-high ATP world No. 3 singles ranking in May 2004. Coria achieved his best results on clay, where he won eight of his nine ATP singles titles, and during his prime years in 2003 and 2004 he was considered the "world's best clay-court player." He reached the final of the 2004 French Open, where he was defeated by Gastón Gaudio despite serving for the match twice. In later years, injuries and a lack of confidence affected his game, and he retired in 2009 at the age of 27. Between 2001-2002, he served a seven month suspension for taking the banned substance nandrolone.

<i>Pete Sampras Tennis</i> 1994 video game

Pete Sampras Tennis was the first game of three of this celebrity-endorsed tennis video game series, released by British software house Codemasters. It was followed by Sampras Tennis 96 still on Sega's 16-bit console and later by Pete Sampras Tennis '97, released for the PlayStation and Windows/DOS.

Serve and volley is a style of play in tennis where the player serving moves quickly towards the net after hitting a serve. The server then attempts to hit a volley, as opposed to the baseline style, where the server stays back following the serve and attempts to hit a groundstroke. The serve and volley style of play has diminished in recent years with advances in racquet and string technologies which allow players to generate a great amount of top spin on groundstrokes and passing shots. The slowing of court surfaces and deflation of balls, promoting longer rallies for the enjoyment of spectators, has also decreased the serve and volley style.

Pickleball Paddleball sport combining elements of tennis, badminton, and table tennis

Pickleball is a paddleball sport that combines elements of tennis, badminton, and table tennis. Two or four players use solid paddles made of wood or composite materials to hit a perforated polymer ball, with 26-40 round holes, over a net. The sport shares features of other racquet sports: the dimensions and layout of a badminton court, and a net and rules somewhat similar to tennis, with several modifications. Pickleball was invented in the mid 1960s as a children's backyard game.

A volley in tennis is a shot in which the ball is struck before it bounces on the ground. Generally a player hits a volley while standing near the net, although it can be executed farther back, in the middle of the tennis court or even near the baseline. The word derives from M. French volée meaning flight.

A point in tennis is the smallest subdivision of the match, the completion of which changes the score. A point can consist of a double fault by the server, in which case it is won by the receiver; otherwise, it begins with a legal serve by one side's server to the receiver on the other, and continues until one side fails to make a legal return to the other, losing the point. Four points win a game, counted as 15, 30, 40. A game must be won by at least two points.

Lob (tennis) way of hitting in tennis

A lob in tennis is hitting the ball high and deep into the opponent's court. It can be used as an offensive or defensive weapon depending on the situation.

In tennis, there are a variety of types of shots which can be categorized in various ways. The grip you place on will help you have different types of shots, the lower your grip means that the ball is most likely going to be a ground stroke. According to William T. Tilden, "All tennis strokes, should be made with the body' at right angles to the net, with the shoulders lined up parallel to the line of flight of the ball ." The serve is the opening shot of a point. Groundstrokes are hit after the ball has already bounced, and can be either forehands or backhands depending on which direction the racket is swung relative to the body. A lob is a groundstroke hit well over the head of an opponent who is positioned at the net. A passing shot is a groundstroke that is hit out of reach of an opponent at the net far to his left or right. A cross-court shot is a shot hit from the left side of one player's court to the left side of the other player's court, so that it crosses the lengthwise centerline of the court. A down-the-line shot is one that is hit more or less parallel to, and near to, one of the sidelines, so that it never crosses the centerline.

Players use different tennis strategies to enhance their own strengths and exploit their opponent's weaknesses in order to gain the advantage and win more points.

Radek Štěpánek Czech tennis player

Radek Štěpánek is a retired professional tennis player from the Czech Republic. His career-high singles ranking was world No. 8 and best doubles ranking was world No. 4. Štěpánek's biggest achievements are reaching two Masters 1000 event finals and the quarterfinals of Wimbledon in 2006, as well as winning the deciding match for Czech Republic's Davis Cup winning team in 2012 and again in 2013. In doubles, he won his first Grand Slam title at the 2012 Australian Open, along with Indian partner Leander Paes, defeating the Bryan Brothers in the final. Paes and Štěpánek also won the men's doubles title at the 2013 US Open, defeating Bruno Soares and Alexander Peya in the final. In November 2017, he became a coach of Novak Djokovic and in May 2019, he joined Andre Agassi as part of Grigor Dimitrov's coaching staff.

Traditionally, tennis is played between two people in a singles match, or two pairs in a doubles match.

Tennis games are often used to help players of all abilities to practice the different strokes involved in tennis. The number of participants needed varies from as few as two players to as many players as can fit on a tennis court. These games are often used by coaches and other tennis instructors to help teach the basic skills of tennis.a substitute shall be allowed to field for any player who may during the match be incapacitated illness or injury, but not for any reason without the consent of the opposing captain.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to tennis:

Benoît Paire French tennis player

Benoît Paire is a French professional tennis player.

Serve (tennis) start a point in tennis

A serve in tennis is a shot to start a point. A player will hit the ball with a racquet so it will fall into the diagonally opposite service box without being stopped by the net. Normally players begin a serve by tossing the ball into the air and hitting it. The ball can only touch the net on a return and will be considered good if it falls on the opposite side. If the ball contacts the net on the serve but then proceeds to the proper service box, it is called a let; this is not a legal serve in the major tours although it is also not a fault. Players normally serve overhead, however serving underhand is allowed. The serve is the only shot a player can take their time to set up instead of having to react to an opponent's shot. But as of 2012, there is a 25-second limit to be allowed between points.

Daniil Medvedev Russian male tennis player

Daniil Sergeyevich Medvedev is a Russian professional tennis player. Medvedev has a career-high ATP singles ranking of world No. 4, achieved on 9 September 2019. He has won seven ATP singles titles, including two Masters 1000 titles.

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