Rec footy

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Recreational Football Recfooty.jpg
Recreational Football

Recreational Football (also known as Rec Footy or Recreational Footy) is a non-contact version of the Australian rules football game sanctioned by the Australian Football League. It is a more accessible version of Australian rules football that people can pick up and play with some degree of skill and ability and it is directly aligned to the traditional game of Australian rules football. It is a mixed competition, accessible to players of both sexes, all shapes and sizes and requires minimal equipment to play.

Contents

Comparisons with Australian rules football

Field size, number of players and duration of play

Rec Footy teams are much smaller than Australian Rules Football, with two teams of 8. Unlike Australian Rules Football, unlimited number of interchange players are allowed. The field is also much smaller than an Australian Rules Football oval, consisting of a rectangular surface with a maximum length of 100 metres by 50 metres wide. Games are much shorter and do not consist of quarters, with only two 20 minute halves.[ citation needed ]

Rule differences to encourage female participation

The game encourages female participation, with a minimum of 3 female players per mixed side. In addition, teams are encouraged to play females in the forward line, with a goal kicked by a female worth 3 more points (9) than a goal kicked by a male player (6). The game is played with a modified Australian rules ball, which is the same size but prevents it from being kicked long distances to reduce the kicking advantage of males over females.[ citation needed ]

Rule differences to prevent physical contact

Unlike Australian rules football, there is no contesting for possession with the exception of removing a player's tag, which substitutes for a tackle and gives the player 3 seconds prior opportunity to dispose of the ball before the Holding the ball rule is applied. All one percenters, such as sheparding, blocking, spoiling or smothering are strictly penalised with a free kick. Marking contests are strictly enforced to avoid contact via a drop-zone rule. When any contact is made by an opposition player, a free kick is awarded to the opposition player that is infringed. For deliberate contact, an immediate send-off rule applies and red and yellow cards are shown as in soccer.[ citation needed ]

Other rule differences

There is no minimum kick distance for a mark to be paid, although kicking off the ground (or "soccering") is strictly banned. A 15-metre penalty substitutes for a 50-metre penalty.[ citation needed ] If the ball it disposed of by a player and hits the ground, it is a free kick to the nearest opposition player. Although there is no offside rule in Australian Football, Rec Footy restricts player movement to zones, similarly to netball, and players wear netball like bibs to identify their position on the ground. In order to score from a rebound, the ball must be possessed by a player from each of the three zones, otherwise a free kick is paid to the nearest defender when it reachers the forward line.[ citation needed ]

Rec Footy positions
Position NameAbbreviationNumber of playersAreas permitted
ForwardF3 (at least one female for mixed)Attacking goal third and centre third (can only score from within attacking goal third)
CentreC2 (at least one female for mixed)Anywhere on ground. Cannot score goal.
BackB3 (at least one female for mixed)Defending goal third and centre third. Cannot score goal

History

The Carter Report titled “Investing in the Future of Australian Football (October 2001)”, identified segment gaps in Aussie Rules and its demographic reach. The research found that unlike codes such as rugby league with the successful touch football, Aussie Rules did not have a recreational version of the game to cater for the growing recreational participation market. In the past, the nearest recreational form of the game was the casual pastime of kick-to-kick, rather than an organised team sport. AFL Recreational Football (Recreational Footy or Rec Footy) was developed by the Australian Football League to provide maximum involvement at all levels with a variation of the game that virtually anyone can play. It is often referred to as Auskick for adults and aims to increase participation in women.[ citation needed ]

The game was originally trialled in Western Australia by the WAFL in 2003. [ citation needed ] By 2004, the game has grown to 592 players (Western Australia: 34 teams & 344 players; Victoria: 16 teams & 248 players).

In 2005, the game grew quickly, especially in Queensland.[ citation needed ]

In 2006 several new teams began. The sport is now played in all Australian states, with a heavy involvement at universities. A small number of Women's Footy teams in the United States also began playing informal games of Recreational Football. Future representative games are planned.[ citation needed ]

Local competitions

Competitions are typically held in the early summer months (October–February) so as not to clash with the main football season.[ citation needed ]

Competitions are held in various regions of every state in Australia.[ citation needed ]

See also

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