Floor hockey

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Floor hockey is a family of indoor hockey games.

Five variations exist:

Two of these variations involve the use of wheeled skates and are categorized as roller sports under the title of roller hockey. Quad hockey uses quad skates and looks similar to bandy, while inline hockey uses inline skates and is of the ice hockey variation. All styles and codes are played on dry, flat floor surfaces such as a gymnasium or basketball court. As in other hockey codes, players on each team attempt to shoot a ball or puck into a goal using sticks, usually with a curved end. [1] Floor hockey games differ from street hockey in that the games are more structured, and two use wheeled skates. The variations which do not involve wheeled skates are sometimes used for training children to play ice hockey [2] and bandy in a training format known as dryland training.

Contents

History

Floor hockey codes derived from ice hockey were first officially played in Montreal, Quebec, Canada in 1875, but the game's official creation is credited to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Samuel Perry Jacks, better known as "Sam Jacks". [3] Jacks is the individual credited with both the creation of the official skateless game derived from ice hockey and codifying its first set of rules in 1936. At the time, Jacks was working as assistant physical director at the West End YMCA in Toronto. His achievement was later recognized by the United Nations.[ citation needed ]

Floor hockey is a physical fitness sport in many public schools for physical education class. [4]

A version of ringette was introduced as a sport in the Winter Special Olympics in 1932.[ citation needed ] In 1970, the Special Olympics added team floor hockey as an event, with the distinction of it being the only team sport under its purview. [5]

The Canadian Ball Hockey Association (CBHA) was formed in 1991 to provide more formal leagues of ball-based floor hockey. [6] The CBHA runs leagues for men, women, and juniors, and organizes National Championships for each division. [7]

In 2003, the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association Hockey Committee released a baseline set of rules for intramural floor hockey for college campuses across the United States.

Equipment

Floor hockey equipment differs between each code. Some codes use an indoor puck, a ring made of felt or other material ( Gym Ringette ) while others use a lightweight plastic ball, or a heavier ball. Some codes require standard ice hockey, field hockey or bandy sticks, while others use lightweight plastic. In gym ringette plastic bladeless sticks are used while the Special Olympics version of floor hockey uses wooden ones. The types of checking and protective equipment allowed also vary.

Variations

One variation, especially popular in Europe, is floorball. Floorball uses a lightweight plastic ball and sticks made of plastic and carbon fiber. Limited checking is permitted.

Another variation, cosom hockey, uses plastic sticks and pucks, while gym ringette uses circular rings and sticks with no blade.

Power hockey is a floor hockey game similar to floorball that has been designed for players using electric wheelchairs. Knee pads are required for the goal keeper

Rules

Although floor hockey is made up of several different codes, there are some basic rules which are typically followed regardless of code.

With the exception of gym ringette, games start with a face-off, where a player from each team have an equal chance to gain possession. The face-off is also used to resume play after goals, and to start each period.

A goal is scored when the entire puck or ball crosses the plane of the goal line, unless it is intentionally kicked in by the attacking team.

The team with the most goals at the end of the game is declared the winner. If the game is tied, the games usually proceed into golden goal period(s) in order to determine a winner. Overtime rules vary, but typically include extra time and/or penalty shootout.

Penalties for illegal actions are enforced. A player committing a major infraction is required to sit out of the game for two minutes, resulting a power play, but a minor infraction may result in a free hit. Penalties are typically given for the following actions:

Due to the limited padding worn by players, body checking is typically disallowed in floor hockey games, [8] although shoulder-to-shoulder checking is allowed.

Related Research Articles

Bandy Ballgame on ice played using skates and sticks

Bandy is a team winter sport played on ice, in which skaters use sticks to direct a ball into the opposing team's goal.

Floorball Indoor team sport

Floorball is a type of floor hockey with five players and a goalkeeper in each team. Men and women play indoors with 96–115.5 cm-long (37.8–45.5 in) sticks and a 70–72 mm-circumference (2.76–2.83 in) plastic ball with holes. Matches are played in three twenty-minute periods. Floorball was included in the World Games for the first time in 2017 in Wroclaw, Poland. Sweden were the first World Games gold medal winners.

Hockey is a sport in which two teams play against each other by trying to manoeuvre a ball or a puck into the opponent's goal using a hockey stick. There are many types of hockey such as bandy, field hockey, ice hockey and rink hockey.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score goals. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually fielding six players at a time: one goaltender, and five players who skate the span of the ice trying to control the puck and score goals against the opposing team.

Roller hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using wheeled skates. The term "Roller hockey" is often used interchangeably to refer to three variant forms chiefly differentiated by the equipment used: traditional "Roller hockey", played with quad skates and a ball, "Inline hockey", played with inline skates and puck and "Skater hockey", played with quad skates or inline skates and plastic ball. Most professional inline hockey games take place on an indoor or outdoor sport court. Otherwise, any dry surface can be used to host a game, typically a roller rink, macadam, or cement. Combined, roller hockey is played in nearly 60 countries worldwide.

Goalkeeper Sports position played in defense of ones own right

In many team sports which involve scoring goals, the goalkeeper is a designated player charged with directly preventing the opposing team from scoring by blocking or intercepting opposing shots on goal.

A hockey stick is a piece of sport equipment used by the players in all the forms of hockey to move the ball or puck either to push, pull, hit, strike, flick, steer, launch or stop the ball/puck during play with the objective being to move the ball/puck around the playing area using the stick, and then trying to score.

Penalty (ice hockey) Punishment for breaking the rules in ice hockey

A penalty in ice hockey is a punishment for an infringement of the rules. Most penalties are enforced by sending the offending player to a penalty box for a set number of minutes. During the penalty the player may not participate in play. Penalties are called and enforced by the referee, or in some cases, the linesman. The offending team may not replace the player on the ice, leaving them short-handed as opposed to full strength. When the opposing team is said to be on a power play, they will have one more player on the ice than the short-handed team. The short-handed team is said to be "on the penalty kill" until the penalty expires and the penalized player returns to play. While standards vary somewhat between leagues, most leagues recognize several common varieties of penalties, as well as common infractions.

Face-off Method used to begin play in ice hockey and some other sports

A face-off is the method used to begin and restart play after goals in some sports using sticks, primarily ice hockey, bandy and lacrosse. The two teams line up in opposition to each other, and the opposing players attempt to gain control of the puck or ball after it is dropped or otherwise placed between their sticks by an official.

Shinny

Shinny is an informal type of hockey played on ice. It is also used as another term for street hockey. There are no formal rules or specific positions, and often, there are no goaltenders. The goal areas at each end may be marked by nets, or simply by objects, such as stones or blocks of snow. Body checking and lifting or "roofing/reefing/raising the puck" are often forbidden because the players are not wearing protective equipment. Shinny is a game that all levels of hockey enthusiasts can play because it requires no rink, requires no skills except ability to hold a stick and at the very least to try to touch the puck or ball when it goes by. Shinny may be completely non-competitive and recreational.

Street hockey A ball and stick sport

Street hockey is a variation of the sport of ice hockey where the game is played outdoors on foot, or with inline or roller skates using a ball or puck. Both ball and puck are typically designed to be played on non-ice surfaces. The object of the game is to score more goals than the opposing team by shooting the ball or puck into the opposing team's net. Street hockey in pickup form is generally played under the following guidelines since there are no "official rules" for local pickup hockey:

Roller in-line hockey team sport played on roller skates

Roller inline hockey, or inline hockey is a variant of hockey played on a hard, smooth surface, with players using inline skates to move and hockey sticks to shoot a hard, plastic puck into their opponent's goal to score points. There are five players including the goalkeeper from each team on the rink at a time, while teams normally consist of 16 players.

Power Hockey is a competitive, fast-paced hockey game based on the use of a power wheelchair. The foundation of the sport derives from ice hockey and floor hockey, but with adapted rules to enable people with disabilities, who use a power wheelchair, to play and be active in a competitive team setting. The sport is also referred to as Electric Wheelchair Hockey or Electric Wheelchair Floorball in various parts of the world.

This is a list of common terms used in ice hockey along with the definition of these terms.

Foot hockey is a sport related to hockey in which the only equipment is a ball, most commonly a tennis ball, that is kicked about the playing surface by the players in an attempt to score a goal on the opposing goaltender. It has been described as a "combination of hockey, soccer and handball" and "a form of soccer with a tennis ball". Foot hockey is played indoors or outdoors; footwear is optional indoors, but must be worn by either all or none of the players. It may be unisex or coed. Participation in foot hockey produced fewer catastrophic injuries than other winter sports in studies from 1986 to 1995.

Ringette Team sport played on ice or on a gym floor

Ringette is a team sport with two variations, an indoor and an outdoor version. The winter sport is played on an ice rink. One indoor court version is called gym ringette.

Pond hockey form of ice hockey

Pond hockey is a form of ice hockey similar in its object and appearance to traditional ice hockey, but simplified and designed to be played on part of a natural frozen body of water. The rink is 50 to 80 percent the size of a standard NHL-specification rink, and has no boards or glass surrounding it; usually only a barrier of snow keeps the puck in play. In addition, because there are no protective barriers behind the goal to contain high errant shots, the top of the goal is lower, in fact only slightly taller than the width of a puck, and the game does not have a formal goalie. Because of these differences, pond hockey places more emphasis on skating and puckhandling ability and less on shooting and checking. Non-competitive pond hockey is played with improvised goals, rinks of a variety of sizes, and no boards or snow barriers. There can only be 4 players playing per team at a time but have many subs to sub in.

Ice hockey equipment specialized equipment used to facilitate the play of the game of ice hockey and to protect the athletes

In ice hockey, players use specialized equipment both to facilitate the play of the game and for protection as this is a sport where injuries are common, therefore, all players are encouraged to protect their bodies from bruises and severe fractures.

Box hockey is an active hand game played between two people with sticks, a puck and a compartmented box, and typically played outdoors. The object of the game is to move a hockey puck through the center dividers, of the box, out through a hole placed at each end of the box, also known as the goal. The two players face one another on either side of the box, and each attempts to move the puck to their left. If a player succeeds in getting the puck to exit the box through the goal, the player scores one point. The first player to score the predetermined number of goals wins the game.

The Hockey Canada Officiating Program(sometimes abbreviated HCOP or less commonly CHOP) is the governing body for on-ice officials for all ice hockey games played under the jurisdiction of Hockey Canada. The Hockey Canada Rulebook provides in-depth explanation and examples of all rules governing hockey in Canada.

References

  1. “Floor Hockey Rules,”
  2. "floor hockey". Webster's Sports Dictionary. Springfield, Mass.: G&G Merriam Company. 1976. p. 158.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-09-25. Retrieved 2015-09-25.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. Encyclopædia Britannica, Academic Edition, s.v. “Ice Hockey”
  5. "Floor Hockey: Sport History". Special Olympics – Pennsylvania. Archived from the original on March 22, 2012.
  6. "Canadian Ball Hockey Association : Powered by GOALLINE". cbha.com. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  7. "Canadian Ball Hockey Association : Powered by GOALLINE". cbha.com. Retrieved 2020-07-14.
  8. “NIRSA Floor Hockey Basics,” Last modified 2010, The National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association,