Hornussen

Last updated
Hornussen
Hornussen catching.jpg
Stopping the hornuss in flight
Presence
Country or region Switzerland
Olympic No
Paralympic No
Hitting the hornuss Hornussen hitting.jpg
Hitting the hornuss
The hornuss on the bock Hornussen bock.jpg
The hornuss on the bock
A schindel (shingle) Hornussen schindeln.jpg
A schindel (shingle)

Hornussen is an indigenous Swiss sport. The sport gets its name from the puck which is known as a "Hornuss" (hornet) or "Nouss". When hit, it can whizz through the air at up to 300 km/h (186.4 mph) and create a buzzing sound. [1] [2]

Contents

Together with Schwingen and Steinstossen, Hornussen is seen as a Swiss national sport. Outside of Switzerland, there are only a few teams.

History

The sport probably developed in the seventeenth century. The earliest reference to Hornuss is found in the records of 1625 of the consistory of Lauperswil, canton Bern, in a complaint about the breaking of the Sabbath. Two men were fined the sum of 20 francs for playing Hornussen on Sunday. The first recorded competitive Hornussen game occurred in 1655 in Trub. [1] The sport appears in the 1841 Jeremias Gotthelf novel Uli, der Knecht. [3] In the 19th century this amateur sport was very popular in the Emmental and in Entlebuch.

In 1902, the federal Hornussen association was founded, which organises a competition every three years. In 2011, there were around 270 clubs in the association, with around 8,300 members. [1] During the season inter-association and inter-cantonal events are held, as well as group and elite events.

In 2012, the international Hornussen association was founded, which helps promote the sport in countries throughout the world. Since its founding, more than 20 clubs have been founded in the United States.

Gameplay

A game of Hornussen is played between two teams, each composed of between 16 and 20 players, that take turns in hitting the 78 g (2.8 oz) Nouss from the "Bock" and defending the trapeze-shaped playing field called "Ries". The "Ries" begins 100 m (330 ft) from the "Bock" and is 180 m (590 ft) deep. Initially 8 m (26 ft) wide, it widens to 14 m (46 ft) at the far end. [3] A pair of turns, one at the Bock and one in the Ries by each team forms a "Durchgang" (translates to "transition"). In that, the sport is similar to baseball. A normal championship game is made up of two transitions, special events (such as the regional or inter-cantonal tournaments in autumn) might be different.

When playing from the Bock, each team member has to hit the Nouss twice per transition, for four hits in total. The further the Nouss flies in the Ries, the more points the player gets. The count starts at 100 meter, measured from the bock, and adds one point for every ten additional meter [4] . The task of the defending team is to spot the Nouss in the sky and prevent it from touching the ground in the Ries by using what is called a "Schindel". Each Nouss who lands in the Ries awards one penalty point to the defending team [5] .

In the end, the team with the least penalty points wins the game. If the two teams are tied (which happens often), the points of each player are added to form the team total. In this case, the team with the most points wins. Aside from the team score, each player is ranked according to his or her personal total from the four hits. At the end of the season, the best players are rewarded.

Trivia

Hornussen is sometimes referred to as "Bauerntennis" ("Farmers Tennis").

The best players can hit the Nouss consistently over 350 meters.


Related Research Articles

Bandy ballgame on ice played using skates and sticks

Bandy is a team winter sport played on ice, in which skaters use sticks to direct a ball into the opposing team's goal.

Field hockey Team sport version of hockey played on grass or turf with sticks and a round ball

Field hockey is a widely played team sport of the hockey family. The game can be played on grass, watered turf, artificial turf or synthetic field, as well as an indoor boarded surface. Each team plays with ten field players and a goalkeeper. Players commonly use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities to hit a round, hard, plastic hockey ball. The length of the hockey stick is based on the player's individual height, the top of the stick usually comes to the players hip, taller players typically have taller sticks. The sticks have a round side and a flat side only the flat face of the stick is allowed to be used, if the other side is used it results in a foul. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts or a skirt, a mouthguard and a jersey.

Floorball ballgame-team sport

Floorball is a type of floor hockey with five players and a goalkeeper in each team. Men and women play indoors with 96–115.5 cm-long (37.8–45.5 in) sticks and a 70–72 mm-circumference (2.8–2.8 in) plastic ball with holes. Matches are played in three twenty-minute periods. Floorball was included in the World Games for the first time in 2017 in Wroclaw, Poland. Sweden were the first World Games gold medal winners.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score goals. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually fielding six players at a time: one goaltender, and five players who skate the span of the ice trying to control the puck and score goals against the opposing team.

Shooting sports Sports involving firearms used to hit targets

Shooting sports is a collective group of competitive and recreational sporting activities involving proficiency tests of accuracy, precision and speed in shooting — the art of using various types of ranged weapons, mainly referring to man-portable guns and bows/crossbows.

Volleyball ballgame and team sport in which two teams compete to ground the ball on their opponents side of the net

Volleyball is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules. It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games since Tokyo 1964.

Beach volleyball team sport played by two teams of two players on a sand court divided by a net

Beach volleyball is a team sport played by two teams of two players on a sand court divided by a net. As in indoor volleyball, the objective of the game is to send the ball over the net and to ground it on the opponent's side of the court, and to prevent the same effort by the opponent.

Schwingen

Schwingen, also known as Swiss wrestling and natively as Hosenlupf, is a style of folk wrestling native to Switzerland, more specifically the pre-alpine parts of German-speaking Switzerland. Wrestlers wear Schwingerhosen with belts that are used for taking holds. Throws and trips are common because the first person to pin his or her opponent's shoulders to the ground wins the bout.

The penalty shootout is a method of determining a winner in sports matches that would have otherwise been drawn or tied. The rules for penalty shootouts vary between sports and even different competitions; however, the usual form is similar to penalty shots in that a single player takes one shot on goal from a specified spot, the only defender being the goalkeeper. If the result is still tied, the shootout usually continues on a "goal-for-goal" basis, with the teams taking shots alternately, and the one that scores a goal unmatched by the other team is declared the winner. This may continue until every player has taken a shot, after which players may take extra shots, until the tie is broken, and is also known as "sudden death".

Goalball

Goalball is a team sport designed specifically for athletes with a vision impairment. Participants compete in teams of three, and try to throw a ball that has bells embedded in it into the opponents' goal. The ball is thrown by hand and never kicked. Using ear-hand coordination, originating as a rehabilitation exercise, the sport has no able-bodied equivalent.

Tchoukball

Tchoukball is an indoor team sport developed in the 1970s by Swiss biologist Dr Hermann Brandt. Dr Brandt was concerned about the number of injuries in sport at the time and as part of an educational study he wanted to create a sport that reduced injuries, was not aggressive between players and enabled people of all shapes, sizes, genders, cultures, and backgrounds to play together.

Cycle polo Team sport originating in Ireland; related to polo but played on bicycles

Cycle polo is a team sport, similar to traditional polo, except that bicycles are used instead of horses. There are two versions of the sport: grass and Hardcourt Bike Polo. The hardcourt game saw a sharp spike in interest in the first decade of the 21st century and new teams are sprouting up across the world in China, Canada, Ireland, Switzerland, France, India, Germany, Pakistan, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Hungary, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, England, Scotland, Argentina, Italy, Spain, USA, Poland, Croatia, Slovenia, Lithuania, Nepal, Brazil and Cuba.

Fistball a sport similar to volleyball

Fistball is a sport of European origin. It is similar to volleyball in that players try to hit a ball over a net. The current men's fistball World Champions are Germany, winners of both the 2015 Men's World Championships and the fistball category at the 2017 World Games, while the current women's fistball World Champions are also Germany, after winning the 2016 Women's World Championships.

Gateball

Gateball is a mallet team sport inspired by croquet. It is a fast-paced, non-contact, highly strategic team game, which can be played by anyone regardless of age or gender.

Several sports related to volleyball have become popular. Beach volleyball is an event at the Olympics, and sitting volleyball at the Paralympics. Other varieties are localised, or are played at an amateur or informal level.

Powerchair Football competitive team sport for disabled people

Powerchair Football, also known as Power Soccer, is a variant of association football for people with physical disabilities. Players use power wheelchairs in order to maneuver and kick an oversized football. The game is played in a gymnasium on a regulation basketball court. Two teams of four players use powerchairs equipped with footguards to attack, defend, and spin-kick a 13-inch (330 mm) football in an attempt to score goals.

Key (basketball) term in basketball

The key, officially referred to as the free throw lane by the National Basketball Association (NBA), the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), the restricted area by the international governing body FIBA, and colloquially as the lane or the paint, is a marked area on a basketball court surrounding the basket. It is bounded by the endline, the free-throw line and two side lines, and usually painted in a distinctive color. It is a crucial area on the court where much of the game's action takes place.

Kin-Ball Team sport in which 3 teams are in confrontation

Kin-Ball, is a team sport created in Quebec, Canada in 1986 by Mario Demers, a physical education professor, in which the main distinctive characteristics are the large size of the ball and that the matches are played among three teams at the same time instead of traditional one-vs-one like the most of the team games. The International Kin-Ball Federation counts 3.8 million participants, primarily from Canada, the U.S., Japan, Belgium, France, Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Denmark, the Czech Republic, and Malaysia, China. The newest country is the UK. Kin-Ball UK formed in 2018 .

Wheelchair Football (American)

Wheelchair Football is a fast-paced sport that is best played when athletes are in maximum physical condition, and at the top of their game in teamwork, strategy and wheelchair-handling skills for both manual wheelchair and power wheelchair users.

Snow volleyball is a winter team sport played by two teams of three players on a snow court divided by a net. The objective of each team is to score points by sending a ball over the net so as to ground it on the opponent's court, and to prevent the same effort by the opponent. A team is allowed up to three touches to return the ball across the net, and individual players may not touch the ball twice consecutively.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Hornussen - Where the Nouss flies from the ramp and into the playing field". MySwitzerland.com.
  2. "Hornussen - Living traditions". www.lebendigetraditionen.ch.
  3. 1 2 Swiss National Sports in German , French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland .
  4. "Schlagen – Eidgenössischer Hornusserverband" (in German). Retrieved 2019-09-09.
  5. "Abtun – Eidgenössischer Hornusserverband" (in German). Retrieved 2019-09-09.